The History of Sleetmute

Sleetmute is located on the east bank of the Kuskokwim River, 1.5 miles north of its junction with the Holitna River. It lies 79 miles east of Aniak, 166 miles northeast of Bethel, and 243 miles west of Anchorage. It lies at approximately 61 42' N Latitude, 157 10' W Longitude (Sec. 25, T019N, R044W, Seward Meridian). The community is located in the Kuskokwim Recording District. The area encompasses 28 sq. miles of land and 2 sq. miles of water.

Sleetmute was founded by Ingalik Indians. The name means "wetstone people," referring to the slate deposits found nearby. The village has also been known as Sikmiut, Steelmut and Steitmute. In the early 1830s the Russians built a trading post at the Holitna River junction 1.5 miles away - but it was relocated far downriver in 1841. Frederick Bishop started a trading post at Sleetmute in 1906. A school opened in 1921, followed by a post office in 1923. A Russian Orthodox Church was constructed in 1931, The Saints Peter & Paul Mission.


To Community Histories Index Alaska DCCED Community Database Online


History and map graphic used with permission from the Alaska Department of Community and Economic Development