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The Weekly Star, January 2, 1920


Highlights of History from The Whitehorse Star, 1920-1929


Highlights of History from The Whitehorse Star

Explorer's Guides to Yukon Communities



1920

January

February

  • February 6, 1920: The Dawson News reported on January 20th that a telegram received from London by Andrew Baird gave instructions to start work immediately hauling 3,000 cords of wood from Jensen creek to Dominion creek. The wood is to be used for thawing ground for the dredge which the North West Corporation is to install on the creek. The wood is all cut and ready for hauling.
  • February 6, 1920: Mrs. Margaret Mitchell, one of the best known mining women ever in the Klondike, who went outside last fall with the expectation of returning in the spring, is reported to have died in Ottumwa, Kansas, recently, at the age of 72.
  • February 6, 1920: A proclamation was issued in Ottawa on January 24th which brings into effect the amalgamation of the Dominion Police and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police as of February 1st.

  • February 13, 1920: Major R.E. Tucker, officer in command of the R.N.W.M.P. in the southern Yukon since last September, is appointed Superintendent, replacing Col. R. S. Knight in Dawson.
  • February 13, 1920: The Rev. Herbert Gilring, pioneer missionary to the Coppermine Eskimos, died of pneumonia in Ottawa on February 11th, at the age of 30. He was a great linguist, and in the short space of three years mastered the intricacies of that most difficult tongue, and had made good progress with translation.
  • February 13, 1920: Patsy Henderson, a native, formerly owner of a fox ranch at Ten Mile Point on Tagish lake, but who disposed of his holdings there a short time ago and has since been at Upper Lebarge, came into town Sunday and entered the Whitehorse General hospital for treatment of one of his eyes, which is in a highly inflamed state.

  • February 20, 1920: Not being able to procure blasting powder, Manager J. P. Whitney has been compelled to temporarily cease operations at the Copper King mine. A special shipment of powder from Juneau reached Skagway two weeks ago on the gas boat Hegg, but is still lying in that port until through traffic on the railway is resumed.
  • February 20, 1920: Ernie Johnson mushed down from his Wheaton district claims to Whitehorse the latter part of last week, there being so much snow there that he was unable to proceed with development work to any advantage. Before leaving for this place he built several shelter huts along the road from Robinson into the claims in which he is interested with Matthew Watson of Carcross.
  • February 20, 1920: The Dawson News reported on February 5th the death of Frank J. Nolan, one of the best known of Yukon's pioneer mining and business men. He died of pneumonia on January 31st at St. Anthony's hospital in Rock Island, Illinois.

  • February 27, 1920: The first through train between Whitehorse and Skagway since January 7 got into Skagway at 11:30 Wednesday night and the first outside mail to be received here since January 22 was due last night. The snow blockade on the White Pass railroad this winter has been the longest in duration and the most expensive since the building of the road.
  • February 27, 1920: In the February 25 election, Robert Lowe is elected representative of the Whitehorse district in the Yukon Council. He defeated Mr. French. In Dawson, Gavin Fowlie receives a majority over Edwards. In the Klondike district, Paul Hogan wins over McMillan.
  • February 27, 1920: Nick O'Brien of Carcross was expected in Whitehorse last night with a dog team loaded with three cases of powder for the Copper King mine. The shipment was brought from Skagway to Glacier by train, from there to Fraser by Bert Peterson with a dog team and from Fraser on by O'Brien.

March

  • March 5, 1920: In the Yukon Council election held on Feb. 25, Robert Lowe was the choice of the people in the Whitehorse district, Gavin Fowlie in the Dawson district and Paul Hogan in the Klondike district.
  • March 5, 1920: Lieut. Lyman M. Black, M. C., son of Capt. George Black, the former high commissioner of the Yukon Territory, left Vancouver recently for Ottawa to take up a commission in the permanent Canadian Machine Gun Corps.
  • March 5, 1920: The City Cafe and Bakery is to be reopened tomorrow by Geo. Yoshida, whose reputation as a first class cook is firmly established in Southern Yukon by his long activity therein, notably as chef at the Caribou hotel at Carcross and more recently as cook at the Copper King mine. Meals will be served at regular hours at prevailing prices, while board by the month has been placed at $55.

  • March 12, 1920: The Department of Public Works is calling for tenders for the freighting of supplies for the Yukon telegraph line between Hazelton and Atlin for the seasons of 1920-21-22.
  • March 12, 1920: Robert Lowe has advanced the price of wood from $1.00 to $2.00 per cord, according to length. We believe the other local wood dealers have followed suit. This has been made necessary by the increased cost of hay and feed for the horses employed in the business.
  • March 12, 1920: Among the forty or more passengers on last night's train were many White Pass employees, including 13 shipyards carpenters and Al Henderson the shipyards foreman.

  • March 19, 1920: There are many mild cases of influenza reported in Skagway, Carcross, Atlin and Whitehorse. The only death so far was in Atlin last Monday, when T. C. James, the druggist and postmaster, succumbed to the disease.
  • March 19, 1920: Major Fitz Horrigan, longtime member of the R.N.W.M.P., died March 3 in Honolulu.
  • March 19, 1920: Capt. W. J. Moorhead, the new commanding officer of the R. C. M. P. here, arrived from Vancouver on Saturday, accompanied by his wife. Capt. Moorhead, a comparatively young man, was born in the north of Ireland, and has been in the force ten years, four of which were spent overseas in the Great War as captain in charge of a Canadian field artillery battalion from Alberta.

  • March 26, 1920: Due to an influenza epidemic in Whitehorse, Carcross, Atlin and Skagway, a rigid quarantine is in effect for all persons traveling north from Whitehorse. People are required to stay five days in quarantine and are not allowed to get into contact with Indians.
  • March 26, 1920: Mrs. H. Emogene Hoagg, who was in Whitehorse last fall lecturing on Bahaism, will sail from America for Italy May 1, accompanied by Mrs. Ralston, a co-worker. They will work in Italy on behalf of their religion for an indefinite period. Before going to Italy they hope to go to Haifa, Palestine, the headquarters of Abdul Baha, the head of their movement, to confer with him respecting their work.
  • March 26, 1920: An Indian boy named Paul McGinty, a pupil at the Chooutla school at Carcross, died early yesterday morning from influenza. It was reported in last week's paper that all the students and teachers at the school except the principal and one teacher were suffering from the disease.

April

  • April 2, 1920: Kate Carmack died March 29, 1920 in Carcross from pneumonia, following an attack of influenza. She was about 50 years old.
  • April 2, 1920: Following up on a report of some influenza deaths, police went to a camp on Lake Laberge. They found Selkirk Jim, about 55 years old, his wife and his mother were all dead, and his 7-year-old daughter was in a tent alone, very ill. The bodied of the dead were taken to the Jim Boss roadhouse, where they still lie awaiting burial, while the little girl and eight other Indians who were found to be infected with influenza, among whom were Jim Boss' family, were brought to town and placed in the Whitehorse General hospital, where they were so well taken care of that they have all since recovered and left that institution.
  • April 2, 1920: Due to the fact that Canadian silver coin is taken at par in the United States, the silver coin becomes scarce in Whitehorse and its use is discontinued.

  • April 9, 1920: The Dawson News reported on March 25 that the North West corporation has secured a second large dredge for its operations on Dominion creek, and will put it to work at Granville, 55 miles from Dawson. It is the same size and type of dredge as now being operated in this camp by the Yukon Gold company, namely, a close-connected Bucyrus dredge of seven and a half cubic foot buckets, with daily capacity of 5,000 cubie yards. The same company now is hauling another dredge to No. 17 Dominion where it will be set up mmediately and it is planned to have it start operations July 15.
  • April 9, 1920: A consignment of 100 gallons of brandy and Scotch whiskey, ordered from Vancouver some time ago by Gold Commissioner G. P. Mackenzie for use in Yukon territory for medical purposes, reached Skagway on board the Princess Mary on her last voyage. There are quite a number of invalids in Whitehorse who have been anxiously awaiting the coming of this shipment. The goods are being held at Skagway on account of the extreme danger of trying to forward them across the line without the protection of an armed escort.
  • April 9, 1920: Men are now going to Mayo to work on the dredge which is being assembled on No. 65 Highet creek, and will work up stream from that point. It will start work about June 1. It is a five and a half foot bucket dredge, built in Scotland, and for several years was on the MeQuesten river. The new operating company is the L. Titus company. Twenty to thirty men will be engaged there on spring construction.

  • April 16, 1920: Mrs. Laura Gertrude Clarke, wife of W. B. Clarke, M. D., died at the Whitehorse General hospital on Tuesday of pneumonia following a virulent attack of influenza. Mrs. Clarke had lately given birth to a son, and had not regained her normal strength when taken down with the prevailing epidemic. Dr. Clarke purposes leaving Whitehorse on Tuesday's train with his two sons, Waldo and Somerset, and will take the remains east to Newmarket, Ont., for interment in his family plot.
  • April 16, 1920: A.C. Bonebrake and Jack McLean mushed in from 100 Mile Landing on the Hootalinqua, arriving Saturday evening, having broken trail and made the trip in six days. Bonebrake and his partner Abe Henson have a prospect on Iron creek, twenty-five miles over the mountain from Hootalinqua, and have spent the winter dog-hauling supplies and machinery to their prospect. The lure of the wild has put vitality into Bonebrake, for he has the color of an Indian and the grip of a blacksmith's vice.
  • April 16, 1920: Dentist Dr. L. S. Keller has concluded arrangements to enlarge and renovate his premises. There will be three commodious rooms, one of which will be a handsomely furnished and fitted up reception room, another will be used in the performance of his professional duties and will be supplied with all the latest and most up-to-date paraphernalia and instruments known in modern dentistry, while the third will be a sleeping apartment.

  • April 23, 1920: It is reported about town that there has been a big slump in the fur market, running all the way from 20 to 50 or more per cent. from last sales. The big New York sale is now on, and all lines show a remarkable drop in values. As unprecedented prices have jbeen paid for all classes of pelts during the past few months, those who have bought heavily stand to lose heavily. World conditions have been such as to make this drop inevitable.
  • April 23, 1920: The White Pass will not be entering a bid on the winter mail service between Whitehorse and Dawson. Just what developments may result it is impossible to say, but the days of the fancy fast service to Dawson are over. The company is at present operating seven of the roadhouses along the trail, but it is impossible to say at this time what disposition will be made of them.
  • April 23, 1920: Development work lately carried on at the Copper King has resulted in opening the richest lead in the history of the mine, rich both in quality and quantity.

  • April 30, 1920: Among the items in the report of the library committee: The rooms of the librarian have been repapered and calcimined. The librarian was given two weeks' holiday with pay. And it was found necessary to engage the services of Mr. George Ryder, and for the sum of $5 a month he inspects the stove, turns out the light and locks the library up for the night at 11 p. m.
  • April 30, 1920: The Yukon Council on April 27th passed a prohibition bill, to become effective May 29 next. No importation for sale of beverages will be permitted in the meantime. The new bill permits preseriptions for medicinal purposes of eight ounces each and provides for the sale of liquors for mechanical and sacramental purposes.
  • April 30, 1920: The Powers Tours of Chicago, engaged in the business of personally conducted tours of excursionists through Alaska and the Yukon, has issued a neat folder giving the itinerary of their trips for 1920. It includes two photos of Whitehorse; a general view of the town, and one of the White Pass hotel, with a group of tourists and Mrs. Viaux, the proprietor, standing in front.

May

  • May 7, 1920: All owners of bicycles are hereby notified that on and after this date they will be liable to prosecution for riding on any of the sidewalks within the town limits. By order of R.C.M.P.
  • May 7, 1920: The river opened in front of Whitehorse early Saturday morning. The break now extends down stream for about six miles. It is thought by those best qualified to express an opinion that Lake Lebarge will break up about the 10th of June.
  • May 7, 1920: A new 64-foot, fast, light draft utility launch is now building at the B. Y. N. shipyards at Whitehorse. It will be equipped for handling a limited number of passengers, mail and between 30 and 40 tons of freight. Its home port will be at Tanana and Capt. Baker will act as pilot. The boat has not yet been named.

  • May 14, 1920: Herman W. Vance, for years manager of the Conrad properties at Conrad and Carcross, has accepted a position with the company that is to operate the Rainy Hollow copper mines which are under bond from Martin Conway and his associates, and will now see to the operation of the two caterpillar tractors that will be up on the first big freighter. These monsters of fifteen tons will be used to transport the machinery and supplies to the mines and bring the ore back for shipment to the smelter.
  • May 14, 1920: A organization is formed in Whitehorse to put preventive measures into effect against the breeding of mosquitoes. T. C. Richards, of P. Burns & Co., offered to furnish 200 gallons of crude oil at 17½c per gallon, and to donate $5.00 in cash. Upon suggestion of E. J. Hamacher it was decided to use sawdust, which had been soaked in crude oil mixed with a small percentage of kerosene, to scatter over areas of swamp land and the surface of ponds and_potholes of water where such measures could be followed out effectively.
  • May 14, 1920: The sale of liquors in Whitehorse by physicians's prescription is discontinued May 8. The gold commissioner stated that he did not approve of an indiscriminate traffic in booze as a beverage under the nom de plume of "medicinal purposes," and had therefore put his foot down upon the habit, for such it had in reality become.

  • May 21, 1920: Sergeant Mapley of the R. C. M. P., stationed at Summit as assistant inspector for several years past, and Const. Blaate, stationed at Carcross for some time, came down to Whitehorse Saturday to take their final discharge from the foree, their time of service having expired. Sergt. Mapley is retiring on pension after 36 years service. He has been in Yukon since 1898 and has been one of the most efficient and valued officers in the force. Const. Blaate returned to Carcross, at which place he will make_his home.
  • May 21, 1920: The territorial poll tax is now due. All men of the age of 18 years upwards are subject to the tax, and each must pay the sum of $8. The reduced poll tax fee of $5 and the alteration in age provided by the Yukon Council last month are not effective this year.
  • May 21, 1920: Supt. W. D. Gordon of the B. Y. N. reports an unusual number of applications for hotel and steamer reservations for the coming tourist season. Also many inquiries from big game hunters who are anxious to spend a few weeks in the wilderness where moose, caribou, mountain sheep and grizzly bears hold sway.

  • May 28, 1920: The miners in the Copper King have run across a sixteen inch vein of high grade molybdenite ore running through the big body of high grade copper ore in which they are now working. We are informed that molybdenite when refined is valued at about 75c a pound, while copper brings less than a third of that.
  • May 28, 1920: Dr. Mellow, M & M Dentists, states: After making the trip to Whitehorse under large expense, we find the dental law enacted at Dawson this spring places us as outlaws, and therefore makes it impossible for us to unpack our trunk.
  • May 28, 1920: During the past week some substantial poles, 20 feet high, have been erected in the school playground. Swings, rings and horizontal bar will be added, and it is intended to provide parallel bars as well. Owing to the recent sickness among so many of the scholars, parents and friends must not expect so large a display at the sports day as last year.

June

  • June 4, 1920: A meeting of the Yukon Rifle association was held on Tuesday evening at Hamacher's store for the purposes of reorganization. Capt. Moorhead was elected Captain and F. G. Berton Secretary-Treasurer. Practice days will be every Saturday at 2 p. m., members to meet at Hamacher's store for the purpose of obtaining rifles and ammunition, and such other thes ay at jeast five members can be got together. Of these one at least must be familiar with the rules of the range and the care of arms. When the new rifles arrive, which are expected very shortly, they will be allotted to the members so that each man can always shoot with the same rifle.
  • June 4, 1920: Billy Armstrong came in from Champagne Landing Thursday of last week for the purpose of making arrangements for the expeditious handling of a party of big game kunters he is expecting to arrive early in August and to whom he is under contract to act as guide into the heads of the Donjek and White rivers. While here he bought ten of the Royal Mail service horses.
  • June 4, 1920: Mr. and Mrs. D. Alguire, pioneers of the southern Yukon and roadhouse keepers at Nordenskold on the winter trail between Whitehorse and Dawson, arrived in town Saturday, and will leave in a few day fer Chehalis, Wash., where it is possible that they will make their future home.

  • June 11, 1920: On June 9, the I.O.D.E.'s monument for the soldiers of World War I, the work of A.E. Henderson, is unveiled.
  • June 11, 1920: Last Friday's train brought in a shipment of eight autos consigned to dealers on Lower Yukon river towns.
  • June 11, 1920: The annual meeting of the Southern Yukon Automobile Club will be held Wednesday evening in the court room. Alt motorists and those interested in better roads are invited to attend.

  • June 18, 1920: Whitehorse is selected as a landing point for the international aeroplane trial flight from Minnealo, N.Y. to Nome, Alaska. The four planes land in Whitehorse August 15, and again on their return journey, on September 5.
  • June 18, 1920: Bishop Stringer, after an absence of twenty-one months in Canada, England, France and Belgium, returned lately to Yukon. After a lengthy visit at the Indian school, Carcross, and a few days at Whitehorse, he left for Dawson on the steamer White Horse Monday night, accompanied by Mrs. Stringer. In the party also are W. D. Young, late of Champagne Landing, who is bound for the Arctic coast for the third time, Capt. the Rev. F. H. Buck, M.C., and Mrs. Buck, destined for Mayo and the mining camps of Northern Yukon; Miss Brewster of Carcross, on a holiday trip to Dawson, in charge of two Indian girls returning to their homes after eight years in school.
  • June 18, 1920: About three weeks ago John Joe, an Indian hunter, caught two black bear cubs near Alligator lake, back of Cowley station on the White Pass railway. The other day John Joe sold the cubs, which are between seven and eight weeks old, to a man named Bowers of Whitehorse. Bowers hopes that he can dispose of the animals at a profit to some tourist visiting the Yukon this summer.

  • June 25, 1920: Mrs. Jas. Brown died at her home in Dawson on the morning of June 3, as the result of an apoplectic stroke. She went to Dawson from Tacoma, Wash., with her husband in the summer of 1898. Interment will be had at Vancouver, B. C.
  • June 25, 1920: Capt. Le Royer of the Canadian Air Board will leave this morning for Skagway. While there he will make arrangements for an emergency landing station for the airplanes which will take part in the transcontinental fight, on the Dyea farm of Mrs. Harriet Pullen. An emergency station on that side of the coast range will be necessary in the event of a heavy fog coming up at the time the airplanes are ready to cross the divide into the interior.
  • June 25, 1920: The news contained in recent issues of San Francisco papers telling of the formation of two gigantic oil companies, the capitalization of the two together being $3,500,000, would indicate that some actual development work would soon be done in the Alaskan oil fields. With that much money to be spent, the fields should be thoroughly tried out, and if found to contain sufficient quantities of high grade oil, put on a producing basis.
  • June 25, 1920: Robert Lowe is advertising 16-foot pole wood for $8.50 per cord, 4-foot wood for $9.50 per cord, 32-inch wood for $13.00 per cord and 16-inch wood for $14.00 per cord.

July

  • July 2, 1920: Dog Poisoners Abroad. Within the last few days several valuable dogs have lost their lives in and around Whitehorse through having eaten something containing strychnine.
  • July 2, 1920: Yukon Councillor Robert Lowe went to Champagne Landing the fore part of the week with Bob Palmer, who was taking out an auto load of roadhouse supplies to that place for "Shorty" Chambers. Mr. Lowe's object in making the trip was to inspect the government road between here and there in order to make repairs where needed. He found a number of mudholes, as well as several culverts and bridges that needed fixing, and has arranged with the settlers using the road to do the repair work on their frequent trips to and from Whitehorse.
  • July 2, 1920: Wednesday morning the steamer Casca pulled into Whitehorse on her return from Fort Yukon with 85 excursionists who had made the trip down the river to view the midnight sun. The visitors spent several hours at Fort Yukon and saw the midnight sun make the complete circuit of the skies above the Arctic Circle. Capt J. O. Williams was in command of the Casca.

  • July 9, 1920: Word reached Whitehorse a few days ago of the probable drowning in Wolfe river canyon on June 3 of Joseph La Salle, trapper and big game hunters' guide. Wolfe river is a tributary of the Nasutlin river that empties into Teslin lake on the northeast shore near Teslin Post. Wolfe river canyon is filled with boulders and has several falls over which the rushing torrent that flows between its walls drops sheer for fifteen or more feet. The finding of La Salle's canoe, smashed into kindling wood, at the foot of the canyon and his dogs roaming around in the near vicinity, leaves small room for doubt that the daring adventurer, who was only about 35 years of age and noted for his reckless courage and agility, had lost his life in an attempt to negotiate this dangerous piece of water.
  • July 9, 1920: The U.S. transport Gen. Jacobs returned to Whitehorse the fore part of the week from a round trip to Dawson. She took down to Dawson a large shipment of gasoline, oil and four airplane engines, all for use in connection with the New York-to-Nome air flight which is to take place within a few days. Thirty-four drums of gasolie and 200 gallons of oil were left in Dawson for the machines to take aboard at that point. The remainder of the supplies were shipped down the river on the U. S. transport Jeff Davis, whch connected with the Jacobs at Dawson. The engines are for use in case any of the planes break down.
  • July 9, 1920: Tony Cyr, in charge of a government road gang composed of Mike Cyr, W. Ladoure, Jack French, Bob Earle, Geo. Taylor and Chas Ennis, left Saturday morning with their tools, provisions and camp equipment for the vicinity of Cowley station on the White Pass railroad, where they will put in the next few weeks in working on the government road and in repairing old culverts and bridges and putting in new ones where needed to make the highway so that it can be traveled over in safety and comfort by owners of motor cars and other vehicles.

  • July 16, 1920: Word was received in Whitehorse yesterday that the great international transcontinental airplane flight from Mineola Field, N. Y., to. Nome, Alaska, had started. It is impossible, for many reasons, to predict the time of the birdmen's arrival in Whitehorse, but barring accidents and foggy weather, the planes ought to get here by next Thursday.
  • July 16, 1920: Charley Baxter, big game hunters' guide, returned Thursday of last week from Vancouver, B. C., bringing wth him 25 head of pack horses, 12 of which were for Shorty Austen, of Carcross, another big game hunters' guide.
  • July 16, 1920: The Juneau Empire reported on July 6 that William Martin, well known attorney of Seattle, arrived in Juneau on the steamer Alameda Sunday afternoon. He stated that he is here in the interests of the 140 claimants for damages against the Canadian Pacific Railway company growing out of the Princess Sophia disaster in 1918. He also said that efforts are now being made to prevent the Canadian Pacific people from obtaining an order of "limitation of liability" which would prevent collection of full damages. Claims made by the persons whom Mr. Martin represents amount to approximately $1,500,000.

  • July 23, 1920: M. D. Snodgrass, superintendent of the agricultural experimental station at Fairbanks, arrived in Whitehorse the latter part of last week with six head of live stock, consisting of two bulls and two cows from the Galloway herd of cattle at the U.S. agricultural experimental station at Kodiak, and a bull and a cow yak from the herd of these animals at Banff. He is taking these animals into the interior for the purpose of cross-breeding them in the hope of producing a hardy species of cattle that will be able not only to withstand the rigors of the winters in the great northland, but prove profitable to their owners for dairy and other uses.
  • July 23, 1920: Billy Armstrong got in from the Kluane lake country a few days ago and says that on July 7, while camped at the junction of Calden and Lake creeks, he experienced the most exciting and longest-drawn-out earthquake of his life. It continued throughout an entire night and part of the next day. There were between 40 and 50 distinct shocks, immediately following each of which there was a sharp report as though from an explosion of some gaseous matter.
  • July 23, 1920: Dr. Carr of Winnipeg, who had accepted the position of medical health officer for Southern Yukon district and arrived here three weeks ago to take charge, tendered his resignation to Gold Commissioner Geo. P. McKenzie a few days ago. His resignation was accepted and he left yesterday, aecompanied by jhis wife, on his return to his former home.

  • July 30, 1920: At a meeting of the Whitehorse General hospital board, chairman W. L. Phelps laid out all the facts concerning the financial status of the hospital. He pointed out that during the past year the board had been very much concerned with the accumulating debts brought about by circumstances over which they had no control. Food, drugs and other necessities had increased in price, but the income had diminished. The board, after anxious and prolonged deliberation, believed that the hospital could be freed from debt if drastic changes were made, such as stopping the issue of hospital tickets and causing every patient to pay in full both hospital and doctor's fees.
  • July 30, 1920: There are rumors circulating in Whitehorse of extensive high grade silver-lead deposits having been recently uncovered in the Mayo district, but as the stories can be traced to no authentic source it will be well for our readers to not place too much reliance upon them.
  • July 30, 1920: Under the capable management of Wm. Garrett and wife, the Atlin Inn, the White Pass tourist hotel at Atlin, B. C., is becoming one of the most popular hostelries in the entire northland.

August

September

  • September 3, 1920: Klondike camps are on top of the list of Northern gold producers for 1920, with an expected output of $1,500,000 - twice that of the next nearest camps, Fairbanks and Tolovana.
  • September 3, 1920: After three years of heroic, useless struggle under adverse conditions the management of the Copper King mine decided Wednesday to close down, and Thursday the pumps were pulled. All the men except those employed in this work have been discharged.
  • September 3, 1920: The White Pass steamer White Horse, when she left downstream August 29, was pushing a barge on which were 100 tons of hydraulic pipe and fittings for the Mt. McKinley Mining Co., which is expecting to commence operations next spring on the Kantishna river, Alaska. Two hundred tons of heavy timbers and plank for bridge and culvert work on the Alaska railroad were also on the barge.

  • September 10, 1920: The squadron of U. S. army airplanes in the New York to Nome flight landed in Whitehorse on their return journey at 3:05 Sunday afternoon. The time consumed between Dawson and Whitehorse was 3 hours and 10 minutes.
  • September 10, 1920: A. R. McDougall and C. T. Gaunt, diamond drill men, returning on the Casca from Lookout Mountain, where they have been engaged for two months past, bring word of considerable activity in all the Mayo region. Large numbers of men are prospecting and about Keno Hill forty miles square of country is all staked.
  • September 10, 1920: During a_ telegraphic correspondence between Dawson and Edmonton, a message was sent from Dawson reading, "Another teacher not wanted." It was delivered at Edmonton, "Another teacher wanted." A teacher, Miss G. Burroughs, was engaged and proceeded to Dawson, only to find all places full. Miss Burroughs is returning to Edmonton, passing Whitehorse to connect with the Princess Alice on the 8th. Somebody will have a nice bill to pay.

  • September 17, 1920: George Artell, an old time hunter and prospector of the upper Stewart region, was called upon a few days ago to face three ferocious grizzlies in the woods, and before the session was concluded Artell had driven cold lead through the carcasses of the three big beasts.
  • September 17, 1920: Captain W. J. Moorhead returned Saturday from an inspection trip to Teslin post where he found about 50 Indians, of whose cleanliness and health he speaks well. These Indians are well off, several of them owning their own motor boats, and having good dwelling houses, which appear neat and tidy. Game is very plentiful, chiefly moose and caribou, though large numbers of geese and ducks were also seen.
  • September 17, 1920: The three airmen who returned to Whitehorse as we went to press last week got away safely next day, and reached Glenora, where No. 3 broke its axle while landing, and where they have since been delayed awaiting repairs and clear weather. No. 4 is reported still at Wrangell after being sent up the Unuk river in search of a party of 10 surveyors who have been missing for two weeks.

  • September 24, 1920: Fur Statistics of the Yukon territory for the period covering the first year of imposition of "The Fur Export Tax," from August 1, 1919, to July 31, 1920, show the gross export tax collected amounts to $4,110.48. A Dawson fur man made a conservative estimate of the catch at $309,501. The pelts consisted of: Weasel, 3,062; muskrat, 44,806; lynx, 334; wolverine, 411; bear, 419; otter, 60; marten, 4,335; mink, 976; red fox. 470; cross fox, 241; silver fox, 133; wolf, 106; Coyote, 57.
  • September 24, 1920: Mrs. J. T. Thurston left Skagway Saturday morning and walked to Whitehorse, reaching here the following Thursday evening. She walked over solely for the pleasure of an outing. She left on her return trip on Saturday, walking back.
  • September 24, 1920: The time has come that Yukon must awaken to the superiority of the motor truck and the tractor and take advantage of it. Even if all the labor needed were available, the government can get but a percentage of the road built with use of wagons and horses that it can with the motor-driven machines. Yukon's old trunk roads are wearing out, and are much in need of extensive repair, while the prospects of a great silver camp point to the immediate necessity of opening a trunk road system throughout the territory. Alaska has introduced the motor truck on its big road work system, and has such splendid highways that auto stage lines operate steadily between interior and exterior points.

October

  • October 1, 1920: St. Paul's Hostel, whose purpose is to provide a home for children, other than Indians and Eskimos, whose circumstances prevent them getting the benefit of a school education, opened in Dawson on September 21st. It is located in the former residence of Dr. N .E. Culbertson, at First avenue near Church street. Read the entire article here.
  • October 1, 1920: The hunting party in charge of Roderick Thomas, four men from Arizona, returned Tuesday night by the steamer White Horse from the MacMillan country, where they have had great sport. The party found game plentiful, and secured a full supply of trophies, immense crates of heads and horns being in evidence on the dock next morning.
  • October 1, 1920: A shock was given the early risers on Sunday morning, to find a three-inch thick white blanket over the whole landscape. But Helias beamed forth and by evening the hoary mantle of Boreas had wholly disappeared.

  • October 8, 1920: A new stage line has been formed by Otto Kastner, manager of the Dawson News, and Dan Coates, general transport man of Dawson. The contract to carry the winter mail between Whitehorse and Dawson for two years was given them.
  • October 8, 1920: The steamer Selkirk, on her last trip down river, struck a rock near Stewart, and had to be beached, sinking in about four feet of water, which leaves her cargo deck above water. Salvage pumps are being rushed thither to get her atloat. The Thistle left Whitehorse with the equipment on Wednesday evening.
  • October 8, 1920: On the return of the Thistle on Tuesday, she brought in five crates containing 13 foxes, from 100-Mile landing. These are from the ranch owned by W. A. Puckett, Bill Geary and George Enderby. They will be placed in the Eisenhauer ranch, which was lately acquired by J. Geary.

  • October 15, 1920: Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Hammell of Dawson were outward bound passengers this week. They are going to Oakland, Cal., near which city they own a nut farm, and will there make their future home. Mrs. Hammell was the first white woman to travel the trail over the Summit of White Pass from Skagway to Lake Bennett. She made the journey in the fall of 1897 and reached Dawson on the 3d of September of that year.
  • October 15, 1920: This issue had several articles about big game hunting - you can read three of them here.
  • October 15, 1920: Low water in the Yukon, and the early cold spell have made it necessary for the river boats to seek harborage in unexpected places, and the ways at the shipyards are likely to be largely unoccupied this winter.

  • October 22, 1920: Abnormally low water, and accompanying heavy frosts early in the month have contributed to bring about the most disastrous season in the history of the British Yukon Navigation company. Up to this date hopes have been entertained of straightening out the tangle, but every day adds difficulty to the problem. Every boat of the service was yesterday in difficulty between here and Dawson, and two are probably total losses. Read the entire article here.
  • October 22, 1920: The New York to Nome squadron completed the last lap of its return voyage on October 20th, all four planes landing safely at Mineola.
  • October 22, 1920: By the lately reported death of the Ven. Hudson Stuck, archdeacon of the Yukon, the northland has lost a great scholar, Arctic lore and exploration a great exponent and the Indians and Eskimos an unflinching and ardent champion. As a missionary he has been in charge of Fort Yukon for about fifteen years; as archdeacon he has had the oversight of all the Episcopal missions in Alaska, and probably has a record of Alaskan travel never attained by any other. Read the entire article here.

  • October 29, 1920: On Saturday afternoon Dr. Culbertson had a call to go to Yukon Crossing to attend the child of Otto Kastner, who with its mother, was among the Casca passengers. R. H. Palmer was engaged for the trip, and landed the doctor at the crossing in 14 hours. Drifting down by small boat the doctor met the Casca at Hell Gate, and came back with her to Carmacks, where the auto was awaiting him. As the child was out of serious danger, the doctor returned by road, reaching home Monday morning. On arrival of the Casca the child was removed to the Whitehorse General hospital.
  • October 29, 1920: Miss Edith Lyttleton, who writes under the nom de plume of G. B. Lancaster, after a sojourn of several months at Carcross, sailed by the last Princess, en route to the east for the winter. She has mightily enjoyed her summer in the north, all but the mosquitoes and black flies.
  • October 29, 1920: The Canadian and White Horse left Wednesday afternoon for Hootalinqua, where the former will be put on the ways, the White Horse returning to Lebarge, where she will await the coming of the Nasutlin. The Nasutlin will go into winter quarters at Lebarge, and the White Horse will bring all crews up, making the cleanup for the season.

November

  • November 5, 1920: When the White Pass train pulled out yesterday morning, most of the town was at the station, about ninety or more as outgoing passengers, and the remainder to take a more or less lengthy leave of them. Despite the late date, beautiful weather prevailed, and those who remained looked almost pityingly on those destined to the moister climate of the Pacific coast. They will be turning their faces north with the birds again in the spring.
  • November 5, 1920: Navigation on the Yukon river closed with the arrival here last Sunday night of the steamer White Horse, which brought back from Hootalinqua and Lower Lebarge the crews of the Canadian and Nasutlin. The steamer Tutshi arrived at Carcross on Tuesday, which was the last trip on the Atlin run this season. The White Pass company has been handicapped by the most severe weather and water conditions ever experienced in the north. Extreme low water and heavy ice made it impossible to let many of the boats to their regular winter quarters.
  • November 5, 1920: Angus Meleod, mate on the Casca, will be stationed at Lower Lebarge this winter to look after the fleet there. Ewen Morrison, mate on the Selkirk, will act as watchman on the steamer Canadian at Hootalinqua. A. M. McLeod, mate on the Nasutlin, will winter at Stewart and look after the Selkirk at that point.

  • November 12, 1920: Albert Miller Rousseau, for the past four and a half years editor, owner, and moving spirit of this paper, passed peacefully to his reward at 1:30 o'clock Monday morning at his home in this place, his death terminating an illness which began Monday, October 11, when he suffered a stroke of apoplexy. Read the entire article here.
  • November 12, 1920: J. L. McVey and E. T. McLaughlin, who have been working during the past season in the Mayo district, arrived in town Tuesday, having come the entire distance by dog team. They left Mayo October 16, going to Dawson, thence south by the overland trail. After a short rest here, they started Wednesday to walk to Skagway.
  • November 12, 1920: Ike Seavers, who left here last month with the launch Sibilla en route to Mayo with a load of explosives, returned home Friday. He was met at Yukon Crossing by C. W. Cash and F. E. Harbottle, and brought to town by auto. They had great difficulty in reaching Mayo with the Sibilla. Running ice and extreme low water in the Stewart made navigation almost impossible and the trip a dangerous one.

  • November 19, 1920: The Mayo country has the promise of becoming a great camp, according to T. A. Dickson, who returned here by stage last Sunday. The Yukon Gold Co. is carrying on extensive operations, and expects to put three thousand tons of ore at Mayo landing by spring. They have sixty-five head of horses and haul the ore a distance of from forty-five to fifty miles.
  • November 19, 1920: C. W. Cash, superintendent of the Royal Mail service, accompanied by Mrs. Cash, left Tuesday morning for the outside. It is their intention to spend a few days on the coast, and then go to Mr. Cash's former home, Decatur, Ills., for a visit. They have not yet decided where they will make their future home.
  • November 19, 1920: Rumor has it that we are to have a real orchestra in Whitehorse soon, as a number of our citizens have met to complete such an organization. If weird sounds are heard in town in the near future, don't complain that howling dogs kept you awake all night. You may be talking to a member of the new orchestra who attended practice the night before.

  • November 26, 1920: Work on the famous Engineer mine will be started next spring, and a number of men will be employed there, according to Ben Nicoll, who arrived in Skagway on the last trip of the Princess Mary. Mr. Nicoll is now in Atlin en route to his mining property, which adjoins the Engineer group.
  • November 26, 1920: The river closed in front of the depot about 5:30 p. m. yesterday The jam holding the water back forced it across the railroad track near the laundry, flooding the street near the messhouse. The water is gradually getting away thru the slough back of the R. M. S. buildings.
  • November 26, 1920: Mrs. Caroline Stoner, one of the best-known pioneer women in Alaska, died recently at Hyder of heart failure. Mrs. Stoner was born about 1874 on a farm near Newcastle, Pa. She landed in Skagway in the winter of 1897-1898, going to Circle in 1898 and to Dawson in 1899, then followed other rushes. She was running a restaurant in Hyder until shortly before her death.

December

  • December 3, 1920: Malcolm McAskill died at his home in New Westminster on November 22nd, at the age of 60. A resident of that city for the past forty years, he was in the employ of the White Pass and Yukon Railways company, and went up north every year to take charge of the boat building for that company.
  • December 3, 1920: R.C.M.P. Inspector A. L. Bell died in Vancouver General Hospital on November 30th. We understand he had been for some time a sufferer from Bright's disease. Capt. Bell was one of the best known men in the Yukon. Coming north in 1898 as a constable with the R. N. W. M. P., he was stationed at various times at Stewart, Fortymile and Dawson. He was placed in command of the Whitehorse detachment in 1915, remaining here until the fall of 1919, when he was transferred to Vancouver.
  • December 3, 1920: Big game hunting in the wilds of the Yukon is usually considered to be a sport in which only exceptionally strong and hardy men may indulge with safety and success. Registered at the Castle hotel in Vancouver, however, is a quiet little middle-aged woman whose reputation in the northland as a fearless and tireless hunter will bear comparison with that of any male nimrod who ever bagged a grizzly. She is Mrs. W. W. Dickinson, whose husband was formerly agent for the White Pass and Yukon route at Whitehorse, and who is now agent for the P.G.E. at Pemberton Meadows. Read the entire article here.

  • December 10, 1920: E. W. Gideon, proprietor of the Caribou hotel at Careross, is remodeling the old Scott hotel building at that point, and will operate it next season as an addition to his present hostelry, which is inadequate to take care of the growing tourist business.
  • December 10, 1920: Latest census gives Alaska a total population of 54,718, white population numbering 29,210 and natives 25,508. In 1910 there was a total of 64,356; and in 1900 there were 63,592 persons living in the territory.
  • December 10, 1920: The R. C. M. P. at Dawson are flooded with applications from stampeders who wish to reach the oil fields at Ft. Norman by accompanying the police patrol which leaves there yearly for Herschel island.

  • December 17, 1920: Word has been received from the outside that several parties intend making the trip to the new oil strike at Fort Norman, through the Yukon. Capt. Moorhead, R. C. M. P., advises that the regulations require stampeders to be provided with a year's subsistence before leaving the territory.
  • December 17, 1920: We counted 30 present at the rink on Saturday evening and 18 in the afternoon. An attendance of nearly 50 shows the keen interest taken in skating this winter. It is somewhat surprising to see little tots of tender years already skimming over the smooth ice with confidence, sometimes on their feet and frequently on another part of their anatomy. But who can wonder, when one sees two stalwart good-natured six-foot policemen shepherding with tender solicitations the tottering attempts of children as young as five years?
  • December 17, 1920: A thrilling tale of the rescue of thirteen ice-bound starving passengers of a passenger steamer which had been wrecked near Cape Prince of Wales, was told at San Francisco on the arrival of the whaler Herman, one of the fleet operated by H. Liebes & Company, furriers, from a cruise into the Arctic sea. The rescue was effected after the shipwrecked passengers had been wandering over the ice for two weeks without food. There were three women in the party.

  • December 24, 1920: The Carnegie library at Dawson was destroyed by fire on December 15. On December 17, two workmen thawing pipes in the Northern Commercial company store at Dawson started a blaze in the second story of the building. Two rooms were gutted by the flames, and considerable damage was done by water.
  • December 24, 1920: The gas boat Diana, owned by Chas. Goldstein of Juneau, which has been missing since it left its home port carrying a load of supplies for the Chichagoff mine on November 30th, is probably lost, and it is believed that the crew of three men have perished. The captain of the Peterson from Fort William H. Seward made a careful search without result. He gives as his opinion that the Diana struck an iceberg and sank immediately.
  • December 24, 1920: If plans now under way by the Dominion Air Board for consideration are matured, Canadian geologists, who every summer make arduous trips to far northern regions to carry on field work, will next summer be spared much effort, and save several weeks of valuable time by being carried in airships.

  • December 31, 1920: Is there nobody in town to represent our absent councilor Robert Lowe If there be, we are sure he will receive the thanks of every citizen if he will bestir himself and get side walks cleared of snow, or at least get most of it leveled down. In Dawson, a man with horse and plough goes over all side walks every morning after a fresh snow fall. Is it not possible for us here to have a similar arrangements?
  • December 31, 1920: The launch Diana, reported lost between Juneau and Chichagoff, has been located. A broken tail shaft put the craft out of commission and she was driven ashore on Lemesner island. The gasboat Dauntless found her.
  • December 31, 1920: The children of Christ Church Sunday school entertained their parents and friends in a splendid manner at the I. 0. D. E. rooms on Wedndsday night, the occasion being the annual Christmas Tree festival. Archdeacon Whittaker reported the Sunday school to be in a flourishing condition, the average Sunday attendance having increased from 16 in 1919 to 18 in 1920, despite an unusual amount of sickness and other interruptions during the year.

1921

January

  • January 7, 1921: A crew of men left Dawson several days ago to dismantle two units of the Twelvemile hydro-electric power plant of the Yukon Gold company. The third and last unit may be left intact, and used the coming summer. Should it be decided to remove it this winter, other power will he used in driving the Gold Run dredge next summer. The units being removed are to be sent to Malay, where Yukon Gold has large tin dredging operations under way.
  • January 7, 1921: I. L. Seavers, better known, perhaps, as the "Caterpillar Kid," a resident of Whitehorse since 1911, passed through Juneau Christmas Eve on the steamer Jefferson. Mr. Seavers is on his way to San Francisco with the intention of saying goodbye to the Northland. He may engage in the automobile repair business with his brother in the California metropolis.
  • January 7, 1921: Messrs. Coates & Kastner have received a new auto truck, which will be used in handling mail between here and Dawson.

  • January 14, 1921: Striking a rock in a slide near Glacier on Tuesday, the rotary was disabled and forced to return to Skagway for repairs. The southbound train returned to Whitehorse. Repairs were completed and trains were running in both directions on Wednesday.
  • January 14, 1921: Miss Ruth Hillman and Robert Lowe were married on December 16, by the Rev. Nicoll, who was formerly pastor of the Presbyterian church in Whitehorse. Bob failed to mention where the ceremony was performed, but a small oversight like that in the case of a newly-married man is excusable.
  • January 14, 1921: J. T. Burns, one of Dawson's pioneers, arrived from Carcross on last Friday's train. With his dog, Peary, as his only companion, he left Fort Simpson in the latter part of July, coming overland to Telegraph creek, thence via Teslin and Atlin to Carcross.

  • January 21, 1921: Frank Wilkins, a fuel contractor for the White Pass & Yukon route, was found frozen to death Monday on the river trail about a half mile south of Stewart. His tracks showed that he was unable to walk, and that he had crawled a considerable distance on his hands and knees.
  • January 21, 1921: H. Colley, C. J. McDonald, D. McRae and W. Murphy, formerly of Dawson, are in town, having arrived from the outside a few days ago, enroute to Fort Norman. They are outfitting here at present and will leave soon for the new oil fields, going via Little Salmon and Ross river.
  • January 21, 1921: Significance attaches, we believe, to the fact that a nation-wide increase in both major and minor crime is occurring simultaneously with the attempted application of a stringent prohibition law and with organized movements toward the imposition of a Puritanical Sabbath law.

February

  • February 4, 1921: R. B. Hyett, White Pass baggageman, is able to walk again, after being confined for three months in a hospital as a result of injuries sustained in an accident last fall. Hyett was taking friends for a drive into the country and, stopping for a brief rest, parked the car beside the road. A woman who was learning to drive came along and drove her car into Hyett's machine. Hyett was knocked down and received two fractures in his leg.
  • February 4, 1921: At the Sophia hearing now being conducted in Seattle, Marine Superintendent Neurotsos of the C. P. R. testified that Captain Locke's running at full speed in a blinding show storm was unwise. Harrigan, formerly first mate on the U.S. lighthouse tender Cedar, testified that all of the Sophia passengers could have been rescued if Captain Locke had granted permission, as all arrangements had been made by the Cedar to take care of them.
  • February 4, 1921: Aultman Bros, of Akron, Ohio, prominent operators in the Rainy Hollow district, will bring engineers here within the next three months to examine the mines in this vicinity, and will make a thorough examination of the Copper King at that time. The Granby interests were here last summer but despite a good report, they recently wired that present low copper prices prohibit proceeding with a purchase.

  • February 11, 1921: At the invitation of Mrs. W. S. Watson, sixteen young people enjoyed a hike on snowshoes to the cabin at Ice lake on Shrove Tuesday. Tobogganing afforded considerable amusement and bumps to the guests, after which pancakes and tea were served by the hostess.
  • February 11, 1921: The masquerade ball to be given by the bachelors at the N. S. A. A. hall on Monday night (St. Valentine's Day) promises to afford considerable amusement to their guests, judging from the preparations being made by the townspeople in the creation of costumes, and by the bachelors themselves for the entertainment of their friends.
  • February 11, 1921: George Johnson and Walter J. McBrien were hauled before Commissioner J. J. F. Ward in Skagway on the double charge of impersonating an officer and obtaining money through intimidation. The two men are accused of going to the home of Mrs. Bertha Hershey on Second avenue on Friday night of last week. They displayed an officer's star and a gun and compelled her to give them one hundred dollars.

  • February 18, 1921: A recent letter from Mrs. W .G. Blackwell, formerly of Whitehorse, now resident ot Dundalk, Ont., states that all the family is well. Rev. Blackwell has a parish of five churches which he serves with the help of a divinity student for Sundays. Four of their sons are making their own lives now while the two youngest boys are still at home.
  • February 18, 1921: The department of the interior is already making its plans to put survey parties in the oil fields of the northwest on the first opening of spring. Three separate expeditions will leave Ottawa at the earliest possible moment to undertake the traverse of the Mackenzie river for the purpose of providing for the erection of proper survey posts, to which may be "tied" oil claims which will be staked in the new territory.
  • February 18, 1921: Strong northwesterly winds and a choppy sea made it impossible to rescue passengers from the steamship Princess Sophia while she rested on Vanderbilt reef on the night of Oct. 24 and the morning of Oct. 25, 1918, according to rebuttal testimony given yesterday by Capt. John W. Leadbetter of the United States lighthouse tender Cedar in the hearing in federal court on the motion of the Canadian Pacific railway for a limitation of liability in connection with the foundering of the ship.

March

  • March 4, 1921: Word has been received of the death at Carmacks of "Babe," the black cob used by Taylor & Drury as the delivery horse before the days of the Cadillae. Old Babe has been kept at the Taylor, Drury, Pedlar & Co. post at Carmacks as a pensioner for several years, the firm not having the heart to destroy him after his many years of faithful service.
  • March 4, 1921: Skagway Undertaking Parlors. Suffecool & Itjen, proprietors. Bert Whitfeld, embalmer. Bodies prepared for shipment. Careful attention given all cases.
  • March 4, 1921: The last mail brought word of a well known official of the earlier days in Southern Yukon - Percy Reid, who was mining recorder at Carcross for years. Mr. Reid is chief inspector of immigration for Canada, and also assistant controller of Chinese immigration. He sailed from Vancouver for the Orient on the Empress of Asia on February 10, on official business, and expects to be away for three months or more.

  • March 25, 1921: Almost completing the allotted span of three score years and ten, Mrs. Rosina Eggert, wife of Jules Eggert, Atlin, B. C., passed into the Great Beyond last Saturday morning, after a short illness. Read the entire article here.
  • March 25, 1921: Mrs. A. K. Viaux has reopened the White Pass hotel and is ready for the spring trade. The hotel is in good shape, as considerable work has been done on it this winter. Mrs. C. Negrean and J. Matsushita have leased the Whitehorse Grill and are operating a first class dining room there.
  • March 25, 1921: The White Pass caterpillar, with Cam Smith at the wheel and D. O'Connor and R. H. Fitch as crew, made a trip to Lower Le Barge this week with thirty tons of freight. The trail is in good shape now that the caterpillar has plowed the snow off. Isaac Taylor and family made the trip there and back on Sunday, while a number of cars went as far as Tahkeena.

April

  • April 1, 1921: Federal grants for the Yukon are cut in half in 1921, from $200,000 to $100,000, with a special grant of $20,000 for the Mayo trail.
  • April 1, 1921: Old Dawsonite George Cossant, after a lingering illness from cancer of the stomach, died in the Whitehorse General hospital at an early hour Wednesday morning. He was 67 years of age, unmarried so far as kmown, and a native of Quebec. Read the entire article here.
  • April 1, 1921: A number of the boys from the shipyards have been very industriously shoveling the snow off the baseball grounds for the past few evenings so that the place will have a chance to dry off in readiness for football. This will give them probably two weeks earlier season than they would have if they waited for the sun to do it.

  • April 8, 1921: W. Muncaster, wife and daughter, arrived in town some time ago from the outside, bringing two horses and three dogs and a rather large outfit. Mr. Muncaster has resided for the past two years at Canyon City, on the upper White river, and knowing this country thoroughly, has decided to establish a fox ranch at Weselley lake, near the Donjek river. He will also open a trading post.
  • April 8, 1921: The Tally-ho group, consisting of nine full claims, is situated in the Wheaton river district about eighteen miles from Robinson station. This property was 3 in 1906 by the present owners, C. J. Irvine, C. I. Burnside, Fred McGlashan, Adam Bernie and William Haire (deceased) and these men have done considerable development work ont the claims.
  • April 8, 1921: T. G. Johnson is busy overhauling the refrigerator and engine of P. Burns & company's local establishment and expects to leave for Vancouver today. This cooling plant has proved a valuable addition to the shop and the town is fortunate in having such an asset.

  • April 15, 1921: Yukon has learned the trick within the last twenty years of keepng much of its money at home by producing a large share of its own food-stuffs. Yukon produces annually most of the potatoes and other vegetables which it consumes; that it also is a large producer of poultry and eggs, and has gotten a good start in raising cattle, and also breeds and raises some fine jigs, and several dairies are operated in the territory.
  • April 15, 1921: Emerson O'Neil, who recently died at Dawson, a former resident of Juneau, was one of the first men to take horses to Dyea during the rush to the Klondike for use on the Chilkoot Pass trail. He went from Dawson to Nome when the stampede was on in that district and later returned to Dawson.
  • April 15, 1921: Stewart City. Since the first of the present month Watchman Angus McLeod and one other man have been engaged in salvaging parts of the steamer Selkirk's machinery and fittings. As most of this was completely frozen in, the work of recovery necessarily has been slow, involving the constant use of pick and shovel.

  • April 22, 1921: Last fail the White Pass company purchased the building and lots next to the Atlin Inn and shipped lumber there to be ready for an early start this spring on the proposed addition.
  • April 22, 1921: Louis Kezer is in town again and will leave tomorrow with W. J. Clethero for Livingstone creek. They are taking in supplies for their summer operations there and, providing that there is sufficient water, they should do well. Louis has some very promising ground on Cottoneva creek.
  • April 22, 1921: A meeting was called last Friday evening in N. S. A. A. hall of lawn tennis players to organize for the coming season. A large number of ladies and gentlemen attended and showed their enthusiasm.

  • April 29, 1921: Cam Smith made a trip to the lake last Friday morning with the Winton hauling the crews of the boats on sleds. The sleigh broke through the ice near the lake and all the passengers were badly frightened and soaked with water.
  • April 29, 1921: In news from the Yukon council in Dawson, it will be necessary to raise more funds by some local taxation to make up the deficit in federal allowances. Several new forms of taxation have been proposed, one of which it has been decided to adopt is an annual tax of $5 on bachelors and unmarried self-supporting women 21 to 55 years of age. The council refused to alter the existing poll tax, whieh they reduced last year.
  • April 29, 1921: Businessmen of Whitehorse have filed an objection with the Gold Commissioner regarding the removal of assayer W. C. Sime from the town, moving the assay office to Mayo.

May

  • May 6, 1921: About 125,000 marine workers throughout the United States are out on strike. This is protest against the 15 percent wage deduction which went into effect on May 1st. All the sailings of the two principal lines for Alaska were indefinitely postponed on May 3rd. There is no chance of getting the City of Seattle or the Alameda out.
  • May 6, 1921: R. M. Grant, private banker of New York City, accompanied by his son, arrived here Monday and left for Kluahne yesterday morning with Chas Baxter's team. T. A. Dickson of Kluahne and Chas. H. Baxter have both been employed to guide these men and Ole Dickson and Frank Sketch complete the party. This is the first hunting so of the season and it is expected there will be quite a number for the August hunt.
  • May 6, 1921: The Taylor, Drury, Pedlar & Co., Ltd., steamer Kluahne has been overhauled and is now ready to make several trips to Lake LeBarge as soon as the ice in the river is clear to the lake.

  • May 20, 1921: On May 14th, R. M. Semmes, the Seattle district director of the Shipping Board, notified the Seattle-Alaska steamship lines that they must resume Steamship service to the territory early the coming week, or he will put on one or more of the Shipping Board vessels. If they are unable to secure marine crews, he will see to it that government vessels are manned for the purpose.
  • May 20, 1921: Mr. McDonald, representing the Bradley interests, is in Carcross from Juneau and has been out inspecting the new gold discovery recently made by Ernie Johnson. This find is in the neighborhood pf 12 miles from Carcross and indications are that it will prove a good free milling proposition.
  • May 20, 1921: David Fotheringham, well known old time Yukoner, is building a new boat in Dawson, which he plans to operate on the Stewart river to Mayo. The hull is 14 by 80 feet and the machinery is from the old steamer Pauline. Capt. N. B. Raymond, formerly owner and master of the Pauline, will be master of the new boat. Okada, a Japanese merchant of Dawson, is also building a small steam boat for this run and quite a number of fair sized gas boats will be operated by Dawson people.

  • May 27, 1921: Yesterday morning three different people endeavored to scale the high flag pole at the depot and insert the flag rope in the top pulley but were unsuccessful. Finally one of the boys of the Casca made the top and won the $5, so the White Pass can now raise their big flag.
  • May 27, 1921: The steamers Canadian and Nasutlin were the first to arrive in Dawson, and the Canadian has left there for Tanana with her load. The Nasutlin has proceeded to Mayo after a rather serious accident in the Thirtymile river, where she struck a rock and was considerably damaged.
  • May 27, 1921: Owing to the reduction in government grant, it has been found necessary for the library to charge to borrowers of books an annual membership of $1.00 per individual and $2.00 for a family.

June

  • June 3, 1921: On May 29, a serious fire damaged the White Pass Hotel, but Mrs. Viaux put 15 men to work and the damage was soon repaired.
  • June 3, 1921: The Northern Commercial Company has sold its Dawson business to a new company comprised of former employes of the company. The new firm will be known as the J. A. Donald company.
  • June 3, 1921: The Princess Mary arrived in Skagway Wednesday and had quite a few tourists on board, the first of the season. A special train carried them to the summit to view the wonders of the White Pass. Trains will run daily between Whitehorse and Skagway from now on until fall. It is expected that there will be a very heavy tourist travel and the company is prepared to meet it.

  • June 10, 1921: George Yoshida, proprietor of the City Cafe of town, has completed arangements with E. W. Gideon and is now operating the dining rom of the Caribou hotel at Carcross. The Gideons will run the hotel itself as formerly.
  • June 10, 1921: Recent reports indicate that owing to the unusually light snow fall this past winter, there is a great shortage of water in the Atlin district, which is quite serious, as practically all the mining there is hydraulic.
  • June 10, 1921: The Regina Hotel is now open. Chas. H. Johnston has been busy on his hotel and now has it in excellent shape and ready for any and all business that may offer.

  • June 17, 1921: With this issue the Star appears under new management. A joint stock company is in process of organization and when completed will take over the business and property pertaining to the Weekly Star. Practically all of the prominent business men of the town have taken stock in the new enterprise and the continuation of the publication is now assured. When the former owner, E. J. White, was here a couple of weesk ago, it was for the purpose of either selling the plant or closing it down. As no individual willing to purchase could, on the spur of the moment, be found, the only alternative was a community enterprise which has been successfully launched.
  • June 17, 1921: Wednesday evening reminded one that summer was here indeed, as the train brought over a large number of tourists - the first real crowd of the season. As usual, there were quite a few pretty girls and all places of vantage, such as the empty trucks at the depot, the lumber piles on the wharf, etc., were crowded with practically the entire male population of Whitehorse, who spend many such pleasant summer evenings viewing and discussing the latest styles from the outside. All the dogs of town seem, to realize the tourists are here, and congregate on Front street, where each and every tourist must needs stop and rave over them. The girls pet and fondle them and call them all sorts of endearing names, much to the disgust of the envious men mentioned above.
  • June 17, 1921: The Thistle, loaded with supplies and store equipment for ithe new Taylor, Drury, Pedlar & Co. post at Mayo, left Lower LeBarge May 2, and after a side trip to Dawson, arrived in Mayo on May 28, the first steamer of the season to reach the silver camp. Mr. Taylor informs us that the whole town was down to welcome the arrival and that business was very brisk, as the camp was quite short on many articles.

  • June 24, 1921: Editor of The Weekly Star is now Mrs. E. L. Wilson.
  • June 24, 1921: Through for the season. Otto Kastner of the Coates & Kastner mail service eft with his wife and family on the last trip of the White Horse for Dawson. He has been here since October in charge of the southern end of the stage line and has proven an able manager.
  • June 24, 1921: In territorial court hel din Whitehorse: petition of Rudulph Bauer for citizenship. This was opposed by the local G. W. V. A. on the grounds that the applicant was a German citizen. Evidence favorable to his character and standing was taken by the judge and the papers were forwarded to the secretary of state in Ottawa for action.

July

  • July 1, 1921: Principally through the efforts of the Yukon Councilman Robt. Lowe the department of the interior has been prevailed upon to allow oil stampeders to record their claims in Whitehorse on their return from Fort Norman, saving a long expensive trip to Edmonton, which was necessary under the old rules. The Yukon is recognized by all as the best possible winter route to Fort Norman and now that claims may be registered here it is certain that next winter will see a big stampede through Whitehorse for the great oil attraction.
  • July 1, 1921: Word received in the mail last evening states that Capt. Janney, well known Canadian aviator, is on his way here to look after the establishment of an aerial passenger and freight service to Ft. Norman oil fields from Whitehorse and Dawson. He expects that his machines will make the trip each way in one day. He will also visit Lake Atlin, with a view of establishing a flying boat service there for summer tourist season.
  • July 1, 1921: Keller Bros. have acquired the park Herman Grimm commenced in Skagway a few years. ago The trees have been pruned, the vines trimmed, and tourists can enjoy the novelty of dancing in a real Alaskan park.

  • July 8, 1921: James McDonald, old time Dawson and Mayo miner, who arrived in Dawson on the steamer Yukon late yesterday afternoon from Fort Norman via the Porcupine river and Fort Yukon, prepared a statement on the conditions at Fort Norman, and the best winter route to that place. Read his lengthy report here.
  • July 8, 1921: J. D. Grennan, who has been in charge of the Yukon Gold company's mine operations at Mayo, accompanied Geo. Coffey as far as Carcross and from there is going with Gilbert Skelly to look over the Ernie Johnson claims and will visit a number of the more important claims in the Wheaton.
  • July 8, 1921: The Rev. Andrew J. Graham will be giving a free lecture about Christian Science at the Moose Hall on Tuesday evening.

  • July 15, 1921: In a plebiscite on July 11, Yukoners express that they want the right to import their liquor when they want it instead of abolition of liquor imports.
  • July 15, 1921: A post office has been established at Keno City, at the foot of Keno Hill in the new quartz mining center of the Mayo district. It is likely that a post office will be opened in Mayo City in the fall.
  • July 15, 1921: Six old time Yukoners and two Edmonton men arrived in Dawson this morning from Fort Norman. They are en route to Edmonton to record oil claims which they staked near the famous old gusher of the Imperial Oil company, near Fort Norman, and probably will leave here tomorrow to continue their journey.

  • July 23, 1921: Dr. Thompson, M. P., and Captain N. K. Wade returned on Wednesday morning from a trip to Teslin lake. They went up the Hootalinqua in the steamer Thistle to the Taylor, Drury, Pedlar & Co. trading post and returned by canoe to Hootalinqua, thence to Whitehorse on the steamer Casca. They cruised around the lake by canoe and made a preliminary survey of the shores for landing places for airplanes and made enquiries regarding the route from the lake to the Gravel river as a means of getting a Yukon winter route to the Fort Norman oil fields.
  • July 23, 1921: On Wednesday afternoon a bronze tablet bearing the names of three Whitehorse men, employes of the Canadian Bank of Commerce who had served overseas in the great war, was unveiled at that bank. Manager J. C. Newmarch said that the Bank of Commerce was placing these tablets in all its branches; 1701 men from the bank had enlisted and 258 had yielded up their lives. He read the records of Lieutenant W. P. Holmes, Gunner V. Hughes, Lieutenant W. H. Snyder, the three men whose names are perpetuated on the tablet.
  • July 23, 1921: A number of local people are thinking of making a trip to the Watson to prospect and stake near Ernie Johnson's property, realizing that this group of claims, the Snowstorm and Mascot, have the best gold quartz showing in this district. The claims are situated up the Watson river a distance of about 40 miles from Robinson and are easily accessible.

  • July 30, 1921: The North West corporation yesterday added to its fleet operating in this camp. The new dredge, designated as "North West No. 2," started operations yesterday at Granville, on Dominion creek, fifty miles from Dawson. "North West No. 1," which was assembled and started operations last year, is working on claim number 17 on upper Dominion.
  • July 30, 1921: The recording of discovery claims on the new Darud Creek near Little Atlin Lake by H. H. Darud caused considerable excitement around town. They were soon over-ruled by the Gold Commissioner in favour of discovery claims staked by J. H. Searfoss and partners on what they called Searfoss Creek.
  • July 30, 1921: About forty people enjoyed a very pleasant auto ride to the Pueblo mine Tuesday, where a real dance followed by refreshments took place. The merrymakers arrived home in the wee small hours, the car ride home in the cool of the night being very refreshing.

August

  • August 5, 1921: All the stampeders are back from Searfoss Creek at Little Atlin Lake, and a list of some of the claims staked is published.
  • August 5, 1921: A letter has been received from Otto H. Partridge of the Ben-My-Chree mine, inviting all of Whitehorse to visit his home on the west arm of Taku Arm. This is a wonderful trip and it is hoped that Mr. Wheeler will be able to arrange an excursion should a slack time arrive when such an outing could be managed without inconveniencing the Tutshi.
  • August 5, 1921: On Saturday, under the auspices of the I. O. D. E., a most enjoyable excursion took passengers on the steamer Dawson to Lake LeBarge for a moonlight trip. As the fare was only one dollar and all school children went free, nearly the whole town took advantage of the enjoyable trip, and profits went to the X-ray fund.

  • August 12, 1921: Frank Dickinson, 24 years of age, one of the crew of the steamer Casca, lost his life in the icy waters of the Yukon while the boat was about 15 miles south of Minto on her return trip to Whitehorse on August 8th. He was washing railings when he apparently lost his footing. See two articles and more information here.
  • August 12, 1921: The White Pass company has arranged an excursion to Ben-My-Chree on Saturday, August 20th. The fare for the round trip from Whitehorse is $10, and from Carcross $5. These fares include meals and berth on the steamer Tutshi from Carcross.
  • August 12, 1921: The king's printer has begun using Canada's new royal coat-of-arms which, judging by the official description, must be rather a gorgeous creation of heraldic art when displayed in all its "or" and "argent," with its lion as dexter and its unicorn, "armed, crined and unguled," as sinister supporter.

  • August 19, 1921: The airplane Polar Bear has reached Dillon, Montana, on its way to Siberia. The machine was in good shape when it reached there on July 29 and will fly over the pioneer route through Alaska and the Yukon which is by way of Skagway, Whitehorse and Dawson. C. A. Prest is flying the tractor biplane.
  • August 19, 1921: J. E. Binet and wife left on the Casca for Mayo, He is owner of the townsite and has large holdings in Mayo. They have been on an extended trip to the east.
  • August 19, 1921: The Slate Creek Mining company has taken an option on the Mascot group of mining claims in the Wheaton district, it is rumored, and will start work on the property immediately. Mining engineer E. E. Bussey arrived in Skagway on August 15th en route to the mines.

  • August 26, 1921: T. C. Richards, manager of the local branch of P. Burns & Co., received a shipment of thirty head of cattle on Wednesday and will leave on the steamer White Horse with same. He will drive them overland from Pelly to Mayo and will have two men with saddle horses and an Indian guide to assist him in the work.
  • August 26, 1921: The collector of customs today received directions by wire from the treasury department to permit the transportation of intoxicating liquors through Alaskan waters and across American territory in the North in bond from one Canadian point to another. This traffic was stopped July 15th.
  • August 26, 1921: P. Larssen, chief engineer on the steamer White Horse, received word in this mail that his youngest son, N. P. Larssen, sailed on the ill-fated steamer Alaska from Portland and no word has been received from him since the foundering. It is feared that he must have lost his life.

September

  • September 2, 1921: Managing Editor of The Weekly Star is E. Chester Roberts, Editor is Mrs. E. L. Wilson.
  • September 2, 1921: Corporal L. A. Vinall and Constable J. A. McDonald, on hearing rumors of the supposed illness of Albert Suppnick, went over to Bullion Creek to investigate the case and on arrival at Morley Bones cabin found the body lying half out of bed with face on the floor. They arrived at the conclusion that the man had been dead for at least six weeks or two months before their arrival. They buried the body near his cabin.
  • September 2, 1921: Word has been received that long-time White Horse resident Richard "Dick" Fitch has been killed in an accident at Fairbanks. He had been operating a steam shovel for the Alaska Engineering Commission. His wife and children received the news at Dawson while en route to Fairbanks, which they planned to make their home. They have now returned to Whitehorse.

  • September 9, 1921: John Hollenbeck, who has cut about 4,000 cords of four-foot wood about 75 miles above the mouth of the Klondike this season, for the C. K. M. and affiliated companies, has started the wood down the river. The first wood has passed Rock Creek, where most of the wood will be taken out of the water. The remainder will be used by the electric light plant. Mr. Hollenbeck has forty men in his employ.
  • September 9, 1921: Dan Cadzow, the well known fur trader from Rampart House, has been in Dawson, getting his winter freight. He will take it on a scow down the river to Ft. Yukon and will transport it in launches up the Porcupine. Last year the district produced about 40,000 muskrat skins.
  • September 9, 1921: Joseph Sheldon who has been prospecting for some time on a creek which is a tributary to the Hootalinqua River and which he named "Geary Creek" arrived in town this week to record his discovery claim. He brought in some gold dust with him which looks especially good as he recorded his find which is not usually done on mere prespects.

  • September 16, 1921: It is almost a certainty that there will be a general election in Canada before the next session of Parliament and from Premier Meighen's remarks a December election is quite probable.
  • September 16, 1921: The Liquor Ordinance becomes effective September 15th, providing for the establishment of Government liquor stores and the sale of liquors. The Government stores shall remain open not more than eight hours in the twenty-four and not later at any time than seven o'clock in the evening. Stores are to operated in Whitehorse, Dawson and Mayo. The bill also provides for a tax of two cents per pint on all near beer sold in the Territory and imposes severe penalties for any violation of this law.
  • September 16, 1921: R. H. Palmer who has conducted a store and jitney business here for some time has left for Mayo where he will open a similar business. He built a good sized boat fo carry his outfit in, the motive power being his Ford truck, but owing to difficulty with his gear he has left the outfit here and will use it next spring in taking in new stock.

  • September 23, 1921: The White Pass steamer Nasutlin which has been on the Stewart City-Mayo run this year and which has recently been engaged in removing rocks from the upper Stewart channel was wrecked a few days ago. It appears that while at this work some part of the gear broke and the steamer struck a rock which sunk her.
  • September 23, 1921: Dr. Alfred Thompson, Yukon's member of parliament, announces to retire from public life and to resume his medical career.
  • September 23, 1921: Three cars loaded with people, food, and guns left for Carcross last Saturday afternoon for a sightseeing and hunting outing.
  • September 23, 1921: T. C. Richards, White Horse representative of P. Burns & Co. Ltd., arrived in Mayo on September 12th, after a trip of 16 days across country from Selkirk with a bunch of cattle for that camp. He left the cattle 9 miles south of Mayo and pushed on through the forrest with his horse in order to get food for the party. He reports that out of a total of thirty head of cattle with which he started, four strayed away in a snow storm on a summit when five days out from Selkirk and were not found again.

  • September 30, 1921: Managing Editor of The Weekly Star is E. Chester Roberts, and Mrs. E.L. Wilson is gone from the header.
  • September 30, 1921: We feel that an apology is necessary for the issue of last week. There were many errors in it and several news items of local interest were left out. There wore several good reasons for this. In the first place our gasoline engine is out of commission and only having electric motive power to use made us work all night part of the time. Then we got in some new parts for the machine and one of them, the pot mouthpiece, simply decided that it would not work. Consequently we were a day late and did not read proof or anything. However, things are moving more smoothly now and we think that this present issue is much more like it should be.
  • September 30, 1921: About a week ago J. W. Wilson, fuel agent for the White Pass, took Frank Dumontier as his engineer on the Hawk, one of the staunchest little craft on the river, and started down the stream to make a final inspection and pay off trip for the various wood camps along the line. In some way they struck one of the rocks in Five Finger Rapids and the boat was smashed and the two men were presumedly lost, as no trace has been found of them.

October

  • October 14, 1921: The name of the pioneer company Taylor, Drury, Pedlar & Company, Limited, is being changed to Taylor & Drury, Limited.

  • October 21, 1921: George Black, living in Vancouver now but one of the best known men in the territory, is unanimously nominated by the Liberal Conservative convention to run for M.P.
  • October 21, 1921: Last Sunday, C. Atherton took two young men to Ice Lake with a canoe, to snag some grouse and ducks. One of the men on shore fired at a duck as it flew past the canoe with the other two men in it. The duck was not hit but both men were hit with shot. Dr. Culbertson extracted most of the shot but the patient will need to go to Vancouver for x-rays to find the rest.
  • October 21, 1921: The steamer Dawson on its last trip north had a very unique experience when she steamed for hours past great herds of caribou. The officers of the steamer report the animals were everywhere along both banks from Thistle Creek to Ogilvie, a distance of fully forty-five miles.

  • October 28, 1921: Liquor runners, operating on a large scale, and boot-leggers, in league with exceedingly clever counterfeiters, are flooding the Northwest, especially Seattle, Tacoma and Spokane, with thousands of dollars in bogus $10 federal reserve notes, it was made known today through Captain W. R. Jarrell of the United States secret service. Money transactions in illicit deals for large quantities of liquor make the passing of counterfeit money easy, Captain Jarrell said, and virtually impossible to trace. The counterfeit notes are more easily passed on Canadian dealers, who furnish liquor runners with their stocks for transportation to Seattle, operatives said, inasmuch as the Canadians are comparatively unfamiliar with American bills.
  • October 28, 1921: We have made arrangements for outside telegraphic news of the Dominion and will in the course of the next few weeks start the Bulletin which will be issued throughout the winter, three times weekly, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. This Bulletin will contain all the latest telegraphic news, with, when this is meager, a small proportion of local interest and advertising. The Star Publishing Company as we stated last week does not care to make money on this Bulletin as their only desire is to give the readers of the Star and of the Bulletin the very best service that can be purchased with the limited means that they have.
  • October 28, 1921: By request of the British Colonial office, the Canadian government will shortly issue a proclamation calling upon all Canadians to observe two minutes of silence from 11 o'clock in the forenoon until two minutes after, on Friday, November 11, the anniversary of the actual signing of the armistice.

November

  • November 4, 1921: A quiet stampede from Dawson and adjoining creeks has been going on for a week or so to Allgold creek, a tributary of Flat creek. Allgold heads in the Hunker dome, from which flows many of the famous gold bearing streams of the Klondike district, and since 1901 has been the scene of several stampedes. The latest find was made by Duncan Michie, who has been prospecting on the creek for seven years.
  • November 4, 1921: J. McAlter, who in the early days of the Klondike rush was the builder of many boats at the head waters of the Yukon, has died in Seattle.
  • November 4, 1921: Alaska's $65,000,000 government railroad will be ready to handle traffic from Seward to all Northern Alaska by January 1st. Only some 39 miles of trackage remains to be completed between Seward and Fairbanks, before the last spike is driven connecting the southern division with the northern section just north of Broad Pass.

  • November 18, 1921: first edition with the title "The Whitehorse Weekly Star".

    The Whitehorse Weekly Star, November 18, 1921
  • November 18, 1921: There is a well confirmed rumor that George Yoshida will have another first class cafe here next year in addition to the City cafe. He is currently Outside on a short visit to friends in Vancouver and Seattle.
  • November 18, 1921: On November the eleventh, to commemorate Armistice Day, the Great War Veterans Association gave a ball as has been the custom of the previous years. The ball began at nine o'clock sharp. The War Veterans, who were in uniform gave a military salute and marched from the stage. The Whitehorse band then played the grand march, led by Mr. Cam Smith and Miss Deyo Puckett.

  • November 25, 1921: On Wednesday last the Ice Carnival for the children came off with great enthusiasm on the part of the children as well as the grown ups. The rink was crowded with parents and other lovers of children and the interest was intense from seven to nine o'clock. The costumes showed exceptional taste and skill bestowed up them.
  • November 25, 1921: Ole Dickson was drowned in Wolf Creek at Kluane on October 20th. He had been there for about three weeks with Louis Jacquot, Charlie Johnson and an Indian hunting sheep. Ole and the Indian were building a little bridge across the creek when a big bunch of ice came down and knocked them into the water. The Indian managed to get out but Ole was sucked under the ice. A search was made for his body but without success and I am afraid that we will never find it.
  • November 25, 1921: The first all horse drawn mail left for Dawson this morning. If there is no more snow than there is now, this winter the auto stage will still continue to haul the mail as far as the river and it will be taken from there on by team.

December

  • December 2, 1921: The White Horse Weekly Star Costs $5.00 per year. The Family Herald and Weekly Star of Mortreal costs $2.00 per year. We now offer a full year's subscription to both papers for $6.00. With the Family Herald and Weekly Star is included a copy of the new Canadian Coat of Arms in true Heraldic colors, size 14 x 17 inches. This beautiful plate shopld be found in every Canadian home. Every boy and girl should be taught to describe the Canadian Coat of Arms.
  • December 2, 1921: Coates & Kastner broke all previous records fon the mail run from Dawson on this the last mail that came in. Just three days and sixteen hours was required by them for the long trip. The occasion for the rush was that the election ballot boxes were in the mail and they had to reach here within a certain time so that the worthy citizens might vote.
  • December 2, 1921: No, dear readers, the noise that you heard last Tuesday evening was not a bombardment of Skagway by the Japanese fleet, but was the noise of the balls rolling down the alleys at the Whitehorse Bowling Club, the occasion being the opening night of the season.

  • December 9, 1921: One of the hardest fought elections that the Yukon has ever seen has just passed and as we go to press the Government candidate [George Black] is leading by a very small majority. This lead is expected to be increased slightly as the districts get further from Dawson and of course Mayo is an unknown quantity, however, the victory for either man lays in this district. Pitts the Farmer Labor candidate, never has been in the minds of the voters, judging from the number of votes cast for him.
  • December 9, 1921: Editor and Manager of The Whitehorse Weekly Star is now E. Chester Roberts.
  • December 9, 1921: Walter Goyne, the famous dog racer, known as the "Going Kid," winner of Alaska's 1920 The Pass Derby is believed to have been drowned in Moose Lake, on Nov. 13th when he broke through thin ice.

  • December 16, 1921: The final results of the federal election show Captain George Black with 706 votes, Frederick Tennyson Congdon with 657, and George Pitts with 16. Congdon won a strong lead on all the Klondike creeks but not enough to carry the vote.
  • December 16, 1921: The body of Ole Dickson has been found about four miles from the place that it was swept under the ice near the mouth of Wolf Creek. It was buried on the banks of Wolf Creek.
  • December 16, 1921: James Richards, better known as "buzz-saw Jimmy," received injuries last Wednesday evening while taking his wood saw outfit to its garage. He was jolted from his seat and slipped into the gears below, and the leg just above the ankle was crushed very badly. It is not known as yet whether the foot will have to be amputated or not.

  • December 23, 1921: Owing to the fact that the editor has important business in Skagway, and as there is no one available to do his work, the Star will be forced to miss one issue, that of the 30th of December. This is very regrettable as the Star has missed but one other issue in the last twenty-two years.
  • December 23, 1921: Dr. Culbertson in consultation with two other physicians, decided it would be better to send J. Richards outside to a Vancouver hospital, as the wound in his foot is too serious for local treatment. It is hoped Jimmy's foot can be saved from amputation.
  • December 23, 1921: The body of an unknown Canadian soldier is to be brought from the western battlefront and buried beneath the Victory Tower of the new Parliament Building in Ottawa.



[The online newspaper archives has no issues of the Star between December 23, 1921 and March 21, 1924. It may have not been printed for that period.]



1924

March

  • March 21, 1924: After a suspension of several months, The Weekly Star re-starts, under publisher J.D. Skinner. His initial editorial set the stage nicely for it to be a community paper - read it here.
    The Weekly Star (Whitehorse, Y.T.), March 21, 1924

  • March 21, 1924: After 26 years with the White Pass & Yukon Route railway and the government telegraph service, George S. Fleming retires. He and Mrs. Fleming left for California but have not decided where the future will take them.
  • March 21, 1924: During February Inspector Moorhead and Corporal Cronkhite made a general patrol of the Kluahne district, making the round trip of over four hundred miles in twenty-three days. Their supplies were carried by a train of six dogs. Conditions generally throughout the district were found to be good. The Indians were in good health and prosperous. ... Last year the Jacquots erected a bridge over the Jarvis river, thereby permitting automobile traffic from Whitehorse to Kluahne Lake, a distance of one hundred and fifty-one miles.

  • March 28, 1924: Mr. and Mrs. Thayer, who are engaged in fox farming at Carmacks, came to Whitehorse for the birth of a baby, which turned out to be twin girls.
  • March 28, 1924: Saturday evening last Livingstone Wernecke, accompanied by W. L. Phelps, paid The Star a hurried call. Mr. Wernecke was just returning from the outside and dropped in to see the office, which he said had been described to him as a model of neatness and efficiency. That he had only a moment to spare is regretted as Mr. Wernecke is both widely and highly spoken of in connection with the mining operations at Keno Hill.
  • March 28, 1924: The many friends of Miss Florence Annie Taylor are delighted to hear of the distinction she won at Sorbonne (Paris University). She was at the head of the list in the recent examinations open to all nationalities. Miss Taylor was born in Whitehorse. This splendid achievment is a credit to herself and an honor to the Yukon and to Canada.

April

  • April 4, 1924: Andrew Sostad, from the Engineer Mine, spent a few days in Carcross and Skaguay last week on business connected with the mine. He reports development work progressing and prospects favorable. He purposes soon to increase his force of men.
  • April 4, 1924: The annual meeting of the Whitehorse Tennis Club was held in the N. S. A. A. Hall on Monday eyening when the following officers were elected: President, W. D. McBride; Vice-President, Dr. Culbertson; Secretary, K. R. Fyfe; Executive Committee: Mrs. Shirley, Miss Martin, S. Coulter, J. C. Newmarch. It was decided to construct a new court to be surfaced with decomposed granite. Other new work contemplated is surfacing and levelling the present courts, drainage canal to carry off the rain water from the Club building, and extension of existing fences.
  • April 4, 1924: Three freight teams and the passenger stage left Carcross for Atlin Wednesday morning. This will about finish the Atlin freighting over the ice as lake conditions are not favorable for a late season.

  • April 11, 1924: The advertising patronage accorded The Star is quite satisfactory, the amount of job printing available is fully up to our expectations, but the subscriptions are not coming in as we had anticipated. The people are not to blame because they have been let down upon one or two occasions. Nor is the present management to blame for the conduct of his predecessors.
  • April 11, 1924: On Friday evening in some unknown manner, fire broke out in the tower on the valuable fox ranch of Eddie Marcotte, across the river from the town. By a peculiar coincidence, when the fire was first discovered, Eddie happened to be at the firehall attending to his tonsorial duties. The Fire Department as well as the citizens, turned out quickly at the first call of the siren and rendered every assistance hauling the hose to the fire, which seemed to have its origin in the upper part of the tower. Neither the foxes nor other parts of the ranch suffered any damage.
  • April 11, 1924: Wilfrid Martin, son of Capt. and Mrs, P. Martin of Whitehorse, has recently been awarded the highest distinction of the University of Toronto in athletics - the big T. He has also been honored with the presidency of the boxing, wrestling and fencing club of the University.

  • April 18, 1924: Sixty-one happy lads and dads were at the first Father and Son banquet held in Whitehorse on Saturday evening last. The banquet was arranged under the direction of "The Beavers," an organized class of Sunday School boys approximating ten years of age.
  • April 18, 1924: Until further notice trains will leave Whitehorse Tuesdays and Fridays at 4.30 a.m., and Skagway at 7 a. m. Passengers must be at depots in time to have baggage inspected and checked. Inspection is stopped thirty minutes before leaving time of train. 150 pounds of baggage will be checked free with each full ticket and 75 pounds with each half fare ticket.
  • April 18, 1924: Extensive preparations are being made by the Rt. Rev. I. 0. Stringer, Bishop of Yukon, for complete occupation of the various mission fields during the coming summer months. He, assisted by the Rev. G. L. Moody and the Rev. W. A. Geddes expects to cover the more populated parts of the northern half of the Territory, from Dawson to Herschel Island on the Arctic Coast.

  • April 25, 1924: W. S. Copland, manager of the Taylor & Drury post at Teslin, arrived in town on April 24th. He made the trip by dog train from Teslin to Carcross in four days. The snow was still quite deep at Teslin when he left but the journey was rendered less difficult because of the heavy crust on the snow. In that district the fur business this year was better than that of last. The Yukon-Nasutlin Mining Company, operating on Iron Creek, have a very bright outlook.
  • April 25, 1924: The river opening at Whitehorse this year on April 20th, would indicate that navigation is likely to be a few days earlier than the average date of opening. Lake Laberge remains icebound long after the river is open. To overcome this delay in navigation two or three boats are wintered below the lake. Before the breakup freight is taken by teams and caterpillar over the trail and across the lake, and the boats below the lake are loaded and leave for Dawson as early as possible.
  • April 25, 1924: Dr. A. G. and Mrs. Naismith left for the outside on the last Princess. The doctor came here in August last to relieve Dr. Culbertson, and during his sojourn took an active part in the various activities of the town. He became an enthusiastic curler and a first class dog musher. In fact he was so pleased with his "dogism" that he took two dogs with him, to live at his summer home at Alta Lake.

May

  • May 2, 1924: W.S. Copland, manager of the Taylor & Drury post at Teslin, arrived in town on April 24th. He made the trip by dog train from Teslin to Carcross in four days. The snow was still quite deep at Teslin when he left but the journey was rendered less difficult because of the heavy crust on the snow.
  • May 2, 1924: Dr. R. J. Moore, Dentist, will be at the Donnenworth home in Whitehorse until about May 16. Dr. Mellor, of M. & M. Dentists, is expected about May 11th.
  • May 2, 1924: The fine weather of the past week has been the cause of a number of heavy slides on the line. A diversion in the river channel caused some trouble at the Mud Bluff last week. The current was washing the side of the grade for about ninety feet, making the track unsafe for traffic. For the time being trains will run through the round house so that there will be no interruption of traffic.

  • May 9, 1924: Premier King is reported to have recently said in the house that Canadians have the right to take liquor to Yukon via the Yukon river under the Treaty of Washington. This right had been stated by Canada and not specifically denied by thy United States. Negotiations we then opened on matters including shipments across Alaska. Under the circumstances the government considered it unwise to press the first question further now.
  • May 9, 1924: The City Cafe is being overhauled and re-decorated. When the finishing touches are put on it will be more cosy than ever. In the meantime the business is being carried on in the White Pass cafe.
  • May 9, 1924: For more than a week citizens have been quite active in the cleaning up of yards, lanes and streets. This town has the reputation of always presenting a cleanly appearance, due entirely to the fact that its citizens are a unit upon the question of a clean town.

  • May 16, 1924: A meeting of property owners of the town was held in the fire hall on Wednesday evening of last week to discuss the question of an adequate water supply for fire protection.
  • May 16, 1924: The life, habits and method of extermination of the mosquito were explained at a meeting held for that purpose on Tuesday evening, when the whole town was organized by the formation of groups to put oil in every slough and pot hole in the vicinity of Whitehorse on Thursday evening. Every man in town has shown an eagerness to lend a hand, and a pleasing feature of the undertaking was the willingness with which the boys - the Beavers - responded to the call.
  • May 16, 1924: On Sunday evening Rev. J. A. Shirley told the congregation that at the vestry meeting on Tuesday he had tendered his resignation at the request of Bishop Stringer in order that he might become the rector of St. Paul's, Dawson. Rev. W. H. L. West, of Vancouver, has been appointed to the parish at Whitehorse.

  • May 23, 1924: Arthur H. Young, of Robertson and Young, producers of wild life and scenic motion pictures, with headquarters in San Francisco, who spent last year in southwestern and western Alaska, taking wildlife and scenic pictures, is back this year for the purpose of completing the work. He came to Whitehorse Monday to get some pictures, particularly of the Whitehorse Rapids and Myles Canyon, and it is his intention to pay a more extended visit to the Yukon later in the year.
  • May 23, 1924: world. In the London Fur Sale where eleven hundred and forty silver fox skins were sold the skin of a fox bred and raised on the Whitney Ranch at Whitehorse took the fifth place. This distinction is all the greater because of the fact that only eight skins brought 100 pounds or over. The skin topping the market brought 134 pounds and the Whitney Ranch skin brought 106 pounds at fifth place.
  • May 23, 1924: The golfing season opened at Carcross last week. The links are in better condition than ever and some very keen contests have already taken place. As soon as the beach is sufficiently dry for the placing of the flags Carcross will have two very fair golf courses.

  • May 30, 1924: Whitehorse is a smart little town at the head of Yukon navigation. If not the most it is one of the most cleanly kept towns in Canada. With a little repairing and paint on the part of individual owners it could be made more attractive still. Whitehorse can develop a big tourist business in both winter and summer if its citizens will only measure up to the opportunity. Tennis, golf, hiking, picnicking, fishing shooting could be among the amusements arranged for in summer, and skating, curling, snowshoeing, skeeing, tobogganing and dog mushing would prove splendid attractions for the winter. Thousands of people are Jooking for the very attractions we should have to offer.
  • May 30, 1924: A much needed bridge has been built over the Watson River some two and one-half miles from Carcross. The bridge is seventy-five feet long and consists of three spans. The logs were hauled by Andy Butterfield and the work was done by Mathew Watson, Const, Blatta and Tom Brooks.
  • May 30, 1924: Henry Phillips is an Indian of the Chilkat tribe. He was educated and learned the printing trade in Philadelphia, and is at present employed on the Daily Alaskan in Skagway. Mr. Phillips assisted Major Dick Burde in getting out the first paper printed in Whitehorse some twenty-three years ago, and later worked on The Star with the late A. M. Rousseau. He came over on celebration day and laid an English lily on the grave of his departed friend.

June

  • June 6, 1924: The last section of the dam was opened May 31st. The dam was designed to store water in Marsh Lake, Lake Tagish, and all its branches, and Lake Bennett. By releasing the water early in May it is expected that Lake LeBarge is open earlier permitting steamers to navigate earlier.
  • June 6, 1924: The navigation season opens. The steamer Casca, with the barge A.B. Shay in tow, is the first boat to leave Whitehorse for Dawson on June 2.
  • June 6, 1924: At 8 p.m. on Monday the Steamer Tutshi sailed from Carcross for Taku and Atlin on her first trip out this season. In addition to a few tourists and local Atlin passengers she had on board Mr. and Mrs. Garratt with a full staff for the Atlin Inn. They will soon have everything in readiness for the season's tourist traffic.

  • June 13, 1924: Thousands of visitors will be passing through Whitehorse in the next ten weeks. It is a serious loss to the town and to the Territory that something in the nature of an exhibit should not have been arranged for the purpose of bringing to their attention the mineral resources and mining possibilities of the Southern Yukon; a veritable paradise for the big game hunter; and the splendid conditions and natural advantages in and around Whitehorse for the establishment of an ideal winter resort.
  • June 13, 1924: Edison Marshall, well known writer, author of eleven books, and winner in 1921 of the 0. Henry prize for the best short story, has just returned from a trip into the wilds of the Yukon made under the guidance of the well known big game expert, C. H. Baxter. Mr. Marshall was in search of material for his next novel, the setting of which will be at the head waters of the Mackenzie-Yukon divide. Incidentally Mr. Marshall shot two bears, and he is very enthusiastic about Yukon as a mecca for sportsman.
  • June 13, 1924: Indications are that the campaign to exterminate the mosquito has produced very satisfactory results. Few if any mosquitos have put in an appearance.

  • June 20, 1924: The Packard family is returning to the Yukon for the third time on Sunday. Some will be spending four months in the Nasutlin and Big Salmon country.
  • June 20, 1924: Howard Colley, who went into Mayo from Dawson by the first boat, is very much pleased with the outlook at Mayo, and says prospects are looking better than ever despite the fact that the ore production of last winter is lower than either of the past two seasons. There are two companies at work there, the Juneau-Treadwell people and another controlled by the Guggenheims.
  • June 20, 1924: E. J. Hamacker is arranging to take a photo of the town at midnight on Saturday. The photo will be taken from across the river and any one wishing to go will be taken along if they are at Mr. Hamacker's store promptly at midnight.

  • June 27, 1924: In a front-page display ad, tours of the Whitehorse area by auto are being offered by Frank Harbottle, J. P. Whitney, Fred Gray, Dennis O'Connor, and Oliver Wilson.
  • June 27, 1924: George Stevens, the veteran prospector, was stricken with paralysis on Monday at or near his cabin at Robinson. He was brought to the hospital here on the afternoon train. His left side is completely paralyzed. His daughter in Michigan and a brother in Idaho have been notified.
  • June 27, 1924: Dr. G. A. Wilson, Superintendent of Home Missions of the Presbyterian Church in British Columbia and the Yukon, arrived here Saturday morning on his return trip from Dawson and conducted sevices morning and evening in St. Andrew's Church. The re-opening of St. Andrew's is another evidence of the permanence of the town.

July

  • July 4, 1924: Despite complaints that Whitehorse has no good tourist hotel, at the present time there are three hotels and, if necessary, additional splendid accommodation in private homes.
  • July 4, 1924: A night of gambling, sponsored by the Whitehorse Tourist Committee is being held at the North Star Dance Hall as a fundraiser for the Rapids Pavilion.
  • July 4, 1924: At the Engineer Mines, about 800 feet of a 1200 foot tunnel has been driven and a shaft of 300 feet has been sunk. Good samples of ore have been struck and it is reported that a mill will be installed. At the present time about twenty-five men are employed.

  • July 11, 1924: The first shipment of machinery to be installed at the Engineer Mines has arrived at Skagway. The mining prospects in the Yukon are brighter today than they have been for a considerable time.
  • July 11, 1924: Boxing Bout. A novel event took place at the Curling Rink on Friday evening. Some coming promoters of the manly art arranged a bout between two of the most promising and hopeful young men of the Territory, K. O. Fyfe, the white hope of Yukon, and Battlin' Bun Hillman, champion middleweight of the prairie provinces.
  • July 11, 1924: Robert O'Brien, of Cincinnati, Ohio, was a passenger for Taku Arm yesterday. Mr. O'Brien is just completing a trip around the world. But of all the scenery it was his privilege and pleasure to view he said that there was nothing that appealed to him quite so much as the scenery on The White Pass & Yukon Route from Skagway to Whitehorse.

  • July 18, 1924: The Government road gang, in charge of Antoine Cyr, have made a splendid job of repairing the hill on the Dawson trail. The hill was almost impassable from glacial action undermining the road. The trail will be put in repair as far as Tahkeena. J. E. Peters is busy repairing the Livingstone Creek wagon road.
  • July 18, 1924: The widely known and popular eating place of Yukon - The Whitehorse City Cafe - finds it necessary to increase its seating capacity. For some time during the rush days the management have experienced difficulty in accommodating the crowd, and several sittings were necessary before all were fed.
  • July 18, 1924: The Steamer Thistle returned on Sunday afternoon from a trip up the Pelly and Ross rivers. It left on Thursday afternoon with a cargo for Taylor & Drury at Mayo. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor and family were passengers for Mayo, where they will spend a short vacation.

  • July 25, 1924: John Black has gone from Yukon. He arrived in Whitehorse on the Steamer Dawson Sunday evening and left for the outside by the train on Monday morning. He expects to make his home in Frederickton, N. B. He has been a resident of the Territory for twenty-three years, and twelve years in its service as legal advisor. He was superannuated a short time ago.
  • July 25, 1924: A closed season is hereby declared and established in the Yukon Territory in respect to Marten from the date hereof until November fifteenth, 1927.
  • July 25, 1924: Kluahne and Muggins Dickson, daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Dickson of Kluahne, are in town on their way to Dawson, where they will enter St. Paul's Hostel. Mr. W. D. Young, who last week came in from Champagne, will accompany them to Dawson, where he will assist with the work in the Hostel for about two months, when he will go to Selkirk to take charge of the work there.

August

  • August 1, 1924: Otto Partridge of Ben-My-Chree called in at The Star office. The White Pass excursions to Ben-My-Chree have become very popular, and last year over 2,000 people visited.
  • August 1, 1924: There was a splendid turn-out of willing workers at the Pavilion Grounds, now named Robert Service Camp after our famous bard, on Saturday afternoon for a clean-up. The grounds were put in good order and present an attractive parklike appearance. A rustic touch is given by construction of a corduroy trail across the wet spots between the Pavilion and the Rapids, and one of the old cars of the '98 Tramway has been placed near the Pavillion. The history of the Tramway will be framed and posted on the Pavilion.The erection of a kitchen was also completed.
  • August 1, 1924: An evening of high class boxing wili be staged at the North Star Hall at 9 p.m. next Wednesday. The proceeds are in aid of the diving tower at Ear Lake, Hockey Club, Skating Rink and Tennis Club.

  • August 8, 1924: The second shipment of cattle and hogs to arrive this season for P. Burns & Co., came in on Friday night. The shipment comprised 60 head of cattle and 52 hogs, all being in splendid condition. The cattle are being driven overland to Mayo in charge ot Martin Damer, who accompanied them from Vancouver. Mr. Damer will be assisted by Roderic Thomas, Jim Baker and Jimmy Murray. The hogs will be shipped by boat to Mayo.
  • August 8, 1924: As part of its heavy boosting of tourism, this issue of The Star, as with most others during summer, has many reports from tourists such as "Mrs. Frank Darling and daughter, Bessie, of Vancouver, arrived in town this morning on the Steamer Casca on their return trip from Dawson. They report a delightful trip up and down the river and speak highly of the splendid accommodation and service of The White Pass & Yukon Route."

  • August 15, 1924: The boxing bouts held in the White Star Hallon Wednesday, August 6th, proved a drawing card, one hundred and fifty people being present. Ring side seats were sold out a day ahead. After paying expenses of $16.05, $13.05 was donated to the diving tower at Ear Lake, $6.75 to the hockey club, $15 to the tennis club and $15 to the Robert Service Camp. It was decided to form The Whitehorse Amateur Athletic Association, for the furtherance of all sporting objects.
  • August 15, 1924: Mr. W. V. McGalliard, one of the driving forces of Whitehorse, New Jersey, has been visiting our town with his wife. He was so impressed with its namesake here in the Yukon country that he had enough post cards of our town made to send to each one of the population of his town.
  • August 15, 1924: The Bachelors were the hosts at a jolly party given at the Robert Service Camp on Friday evening. Although not the first this was the largest gathering yet held at the Camp. Through the generosity of the automobile owners, the guests were taken to and from the Camp.

  • August 22, 1924: There are now in captivity on the fox ranches of Yukon several hundred silver, black and cross fox.
  • August 22, 1924: The poem "Bob Smart's Dream" was again published due to popular demand.
  • August 22, 1924: Already up-to-date, the Taylor & Drury steamer Thistle has heen further modernized by the installation of a radio set by H. J. Hutchinson, the engineer, and a few nights ago the party on board had the pleasure of listening to a concert given in the Palace hotel, San Francisco. As far as we know the Thistle is the first boat plying the waters of the Yukon to install a radio.

  • August 29, 1924: W. S. Drury, of the firm of Taylor & Drury, recently returned from an extended trip to the upper Pelly country approximately six hundred miles from Whitehorse. Read the entire article here.
  • August 29, 1924: After an illness of several months, George Jennings, a pioneer resident of Skagway and one of the oldest members of the Skagway Volunteer Fire Department, passed away at the White Pass Hospital on Sunday night.
  • August 29, 1924: Miss Sybil Martin left on Monday for Victoria, where she goes to take her Normal School training in anticipation of entering the teaching profession. This is her first experience away from home and the first time that Capt. and Mrs. Martin have been left alone.

September

  • September 5, 1924: One thousand dollars has been given in prizes by the Yukon Government to the three persons killing the greatest number of wolves and coyotes in the year ending June 30th, 1924. The first prize of $500 went to A. C. Zimmerlee, Russell Creek, who had 36 to his credit.
  • September 5, 1924: George R. Brown, who is so well known in connection with the Road House at Carmacks, is farming on a large seale. He has now about thirty head of cattle and the herd will increase rapidly from now on. Mr. Brown grows all the potato and root crop that he can use or dispose of. He has put up an abundance of hay to carry his stock through the winter.
  • September 5, 1924: For one man to keep a newspaper running smoothly and efficiently is some job. There are so many things requiring attention that something is almost sure to be neglected. During the first few months here most of our time was occupied putting the office in shape. Following this came the tourists, to whom we felt time could be devoted advantageously to the paper, to the town and to the Territory. Now the time for the paying of the bills has come, and we require twenty new subscribers for September.

  • September 12, 1924: Through the persistent efforts of Robert Lowe the Dominion Government are arranging to transfer a number of buffalo from the park at Wainwright, Alberta, to the Yukon. There is every reason to believe that the animals would do well here and in time they should become a strong drawing card. The necessary appropriation for the carrying out of this project was not secured this year so the buffalo will not be brought in before next year.
  • September 12, 1924: R. J. Jones left on the Thistle today to spend at least a year prospecting in the Livingstone Creek section where he will be associated with Percy Sharpe.
  • September 12, 1924: Between seven and eight o'clock Thursday morning fire broke out in the basement of the station. It had gained considerable headway when flames were noticed coming through the basement to the ground floor. Several attempts were made to blow the fire whistle but none of the men about at the time knew how to operate the whistle. Aubrey Simmons called the fire extinguisher into play and what might have been a serious blaze was quickly put out.

  • September 19, 1924: Tantalus Butte Coal Mine is now shut down for the winter. Capt. C. E. Miller, who has been operating the mine, expects to make a trip to St. Paul this winter in company with E. Schink, of Dawson, in the interests of the Five Finger Coal Company, who are the owners of the Tantalus Butte, Tantalus and Five Finger coal mines.
  • September 19, 1924: Alex Fisher is the type of men the Yukon should have. For nearly twenty years he has been prospecting on Sheep Creek. He arrived in town this week to dispose of his gold and buy supplies. So anxious was he to get back that he scarcely would take time to speak to his friends. Some of the nuggets he brought in was the first virgin gold to be seen by the editor of The Star.
  • September 19, 1924: Morley E. Bones, one of the pioneers of the Kluahne country, is spending a few days in town on business. For some time now Mr. Bones has been devoting most of his time to fox ranching and this industry has now grown to such an extent as to require all his time and attention.

  • September 26, 1924: E. E. Tolman of Chicago arrived in town with W. Armstrong, big game guide, and Johnny Johns, packer. They had spent thirty-six days on a hunt down the Nisling River, and Mr. Tolman was highly pleased with the result. He got 2 grizzly bears, 1 sheep and 1 caribou. He saw a number of moose but did care to shoot any.
  • September 26, 1924: Dr. W. E. Cockfield of the Dominion Survey Branch is spending the day in town on his way to the outside from the Mayo district, where his party had been at work most of the summer. He is accompanied by B. B. Brock, 8. Gibson and C. H. Stockwell.
  • September 26, 1924: Capt. and Mrs. Field arrived from Dawson on the Casca this morning and are moving into the house just vacated by Capt. and Mrs. Moorhead. Captain Field will be in charge of the police detachment here. They are accompanied by Captain Field's father.

October

  • October 3, 1924: The liquor store re-opened October 1st after being closed for a few months due to a lack of supply. Pending the ratification of the treaty making provision for the bringing in of liquor through American Territory a supply has been admitted with the permission of the American authorities for medicinal purposes. In other provinces some members of the medical profession have left themselves open to much adverse criticism because of the liberality with which they issued prescriptions, and because of the fortunes some of them accumulated in this way. Whitehorse will not be a target for criticism of this kind.
  • October 3, 1924: On Thursday evening of last week many of the townspeople met in the I. 0. D. E. Hall for the combined purpose of extending a welcome to Rev. W. H. L. and Mrs. West and bidding farewell to Rev. and Mrs. Shirley, who were leaving the following evening for their new home in Dawson.
  • October 3, 1924: s of September 16th, liquor may only be sold under and by virtue of a prescription signed by a Medical Practitioner duly registered under the provisions of "The Yukon Medical Ordinance."

  • October 10, 1924: Two Indians, Sam Smith and Big Lake Jim, have discovered gold at the north end of Little Atlin Lake. From the meagre details received the situation appears very promising. The Indians had been down about six feet but not to bed rock. The ground is shallow. Most of the men from Carcross are on their way in to stake.
  • October 10, 1924: The Great Northern Film Company have recently secured contracts for six additional Northern pictures, making in all eleven pictures instead of five as mentioned in our last issue. The value of the publicity to this country in the release of these pictures cannot be estimated. George E. Lewis, President of the company, with well known artists, have been in the north all summer and are at Carcross again this week in connection with the filming of "The Eternal Frontier."
  • October 10, 1924: The radio fans in Whitehorse are increasing. The latest addition is E. H. Johnson, who installed a set this week. Whitehorse has now four radio sets: Judge Bell, Lyle Geary, E. H. Johnson, and the set of Capt. Moorhead, which is still here. With these sets in operation the town should be kept well informed upon the happenings outside during the winter months.

  • October 17, 1924: A very large herd of caribou that has been working its way south for some time is now within twenty miles of town. Several of our townspeople have been going out in cars to see them.
  • October 17, 1924: Cam Smith likes thrills and is usually looking for them, but not the kind he got on Saturday night last. With Capt. Coghlan he had taken the mail down the river on the launch Loon. Coming back the Steamer Dawson had the Loon in tow. Rough water was encountered crossing Lake Laberge, and near midnight to Loon broke loose with Cam on board. A life boat was lowered and Cam, now well coated with ice and seated atop the launch, was rescued. The Loon will require some repairs.
  • October 17, 1924: The closing of river navigation brought so many people to town that the hotels had a task to provide sleeping accommodation. The Regina and Commercial were taxed to capacity but arrangements were quickly made to take care of the overflow in private homes.

  • October 24, 1924: Whitehorse has been forging right to the front this year. In practically all lines business is showing a decided increase. The town has taken on smarter appearance and this is only the beginning for the finishing touches will go on next year. More improvements have been made to buildings this year than for several years past. The school enrollment is the largest in years. The spirit of optimism among the people of the town was never so much in evidence. And rumor has it that the town, already lively, is to be livelier still by the organization of a town band. The instruments are here; several old players are here, and the boys say that J.P. Whitney is the one man who can put the thing over.

  • October 31, 1924: J. E. Geary, J. R. Alguire and Lyle Geary went down the river in a boat last week to get some caribou but they did not even see any. They returned home on the Thistle.
  • October 31, 1924: The editor of The Star expects to be leaving for Vancouver about the middle of December. The paper will appear every week but the issues for December 19th and 26th will be in print not later than December 12th.
  • October 31, 1924: In spite of the fact that the copper mines have been closed for some time business conditions in Whitehorse have remained remarkably good. Business men here as elsewhere are awakening to the value of the tourist trade and a more united effort is being made to cultivate it. Properly handled the town has a bright future even if the copper mines were never operated again.
  • October 31, 1924: There was a good attendance at the fire meeting on Wednesday evening. The report of the chief showed that the town had but three fires in the last two years, and that the fire fighting equipment was in splendid condition. George Ryder was the unanimous choice of the meeting for the position of fire chief for the next two years.

November

  • November 7, 1924: George E. Lewis, of the Great Northern Film Company, spent part of the week here looking over locations for prospective pictures and becoming acquainted with the business men of the town. Mr. Lewis finds conditions here very favorable and will return with his company early in the spring to do considerable work in and around Whitehorse.
  • November 7, 1924: Howard E. Davis, mining engineer, spent several days here making ing preliminary examinations for its new owners of the Pueblo and Carlisle mines for the purpose of making recommendations as to how these properties could be profitably operated.
  • November 7, 1924: As intimated in the colums of The Star a few weeks ago Dr. Culbertson has added to the hospital equipment a wheel chair. It arrived last week and was immediately put into use.

  • November 14, 1924: W. H. Simpson returned Tuesday evening from the Engineer Mines, where he had been in charge of building construction. The buildings immediately necessary are now well on their way to completion. Although not finished the two-storey bunk house, 24x48 feet, is already occupied. It has fifteen rooms, each to accommodate two men, and is fully equipped with plumbing, baths and shower baths. The crew has been cut down for the winter months but there are still fifty men at work.
  • November 14, 1924: The train made a trip south yesterday morning to bring Superintendent Hahn and his men, who have been working on the Dam, back to town.
  • November 14, 1924: Alex Forrest, for twenty-five years in the Customs service at Dawson, is in town this week on his way to his fruit ranch at Penticton, B. C., where he will make his home. Mr. Forrest has just been superannuated.

  • November 21, 1924: O. F. Kastner last week unloaded a new Holtz Caterpillar for his stage line. This will make a strong addition to Mr. Kastner's already splendid equipment.
  • November 21, 1924: Mining operations have been concluded on McKee Creek at Atlin for this season, and Mr. and Mrs. George Adams have taken up their residence in town for the winter, as have also the other members of the company. A record for late hydraulicing was set, finishing up on November 5th, whereas in past years the latest date was October 23rd.
  • November 21, 1924: A good foundation has been laid for the ice on the curling rink, and all we need now is a little attention from the weather man. The Curling Club has. suffered some inconvenience and delay because of the mild weather of the past two years, and the difficulty may yet have to be met by resorting to artificial ice.

  • November 28, 1924: Weather permitting, the Annual Bonspiel will open on Monday evening next with five events under the President-Vice-President Competition. The big event will be for the Culbertson Cup, donated to the club by Dr. Culbertson.
  • November 28, 1924: Bishop and Mrs. Stringer were visitors in Whitehorse this week, arriving from Carcross on Tuesday evening. They have just returned from the east where the Bishop attended a meeting of the General Synod in London, Ontario. Before going east they visited the Eskimos of the Arctic Coast, and an online of this journey will appear in a later issue of this paper.
  • November 28, 1924: The task of running a one-man printing office got away beyond the interesting stage this month. Work came in that had to be done and it has been done. The Star has not appeared with its usual promptness but we have made the four issues for the month. Our customary local items had to go by the hoard this week because we could not get away from the office. We had to neglect our duties to the Curling Club on account of business which is a grave breach of curling etiquette, and to make the best of a difficult situation The Star this week is pretty much a Curling Special.

December

  • December 5, 1924: About 25 miles from Carcross at the head of Marsh Lake, renowned for its fishing and duck hunting, is to be found the home of one of Yukon's new industries - the Tagish Fur Ranch, whose owner is Alfred Dickson. Although a few foxes are raised its specialty is mink raising.
  • December 5, 1924: The Bishop of Yukon and Mrs. Stringer started from Dawson on the Fifth day of June on a visitation through the Northern end of the Diocese. They left Dawson on the "Hazel B," a motor launch, and travelled four hundred miles down the Yukon River to Fort Yukon. Read the entire article here.
  • December 5, 1924: That Whitehorse Fox Ranches have some of the finest animals in the world was amply demonstrated this week when Eddie Marcotte brought in four choice skins from his ranch across the river. In spite of the recent drop of 30 per cent on the London market Messrs Taylor & Drury Limited purchased the four skins, paying well over four figures for three of them.

  • December 12, 1924: In the Moose Hall on New Year's Eve a Bungalow card party and dance will be given. Doors open at 5 p.m. At midnight the popular balloon dance will be given. Prize for the best bungalow dress. Admission - Gentlemen $1.00 and ladies 50 cents.
  • December 12, 1924: The contest for the Hudson's Bay Cup opened at the curling rink on Monday night. Keen interest is being shown in the competition. If the weather continues favorable it will be down to the finals on Thursday night.
  • December 12, 1924: For over a month The Star has been very busy with job printing. We have not been able to caary things out as we would like, but the very best possible under the circumstances has been done. The editor expects to leave on the morning of the 16th for Vancouver, to return by the first train in the New Year. In an effort to increase the business of the office the editor will endeavor to visit Mayo and Keno early in the year as the trip would be out of the question during the busy summer season.

  • December 19, 1924: A condition existed in the closing of the river this year not witnessed or heard of before by the people now residing here. The river closed on December 7th, but owing to the mild weather, broke open again on the 8th. The ice jammed opposite the stockyards below the town and the water rose rapidly, flooding part of the lower portion of the town.
  • December 19, 1924: A list of the individuals and families spending Christmas away from Whitehorse is published. Among the many destinations are Vancouver, Victoria, Washington, Oregon, California, Maine, Europe, and Carcross.
  • December 19, 1924: When the vice-regal party visited Whitehorse, Lady Byng was presented with a beautiful necklace of ivory beads made in the modern little factory here now owned by Mr. Jack Elliott. The ivory used from the genus of extinct elephants called mastodon

  • December 26, 1924: A list of several stores and what they offer for Christmas is published. Included are Taylor & Drury (dry goods and clothing), The Arctic Trading Company ("good eats"), W. A. Puckett (gifts), P. Burns & Co. (meats), and H. G. MacPherson (gifts).
  • December 26, 1924: A large photo of The Old Log Church in the summer of 1924 was published. This was a period when the possibility of tearing it down was being discussed.
  • December 26, 1924: White Pass & Yukon Route trains are running both north and south on Tuesdays and Fridays. The southbound train leaves Whitehorse at 8:30 a.m. and arrives at Skagway at 3:35 p.m.

1925

January

  • January 9, 1925: George Ball, the mail caarier from Telegraph Creek to Atlin, arrived at Atlin with the Christmas mail on December 24th, making the distance of 225 miles miles by dog train in seven days.
  • January 9, 1925: Messrs Bob Roxborough, Al. Toots, Fred Johnston, Thomas Duff and Lyman Hodges have been engaged in slashing a winter trail from Taku to the Engineer Mine, a distance of twenty-five miles. They were able to complete the work in time to get home for Christmas.
  • January 9, 1925: An Indian boy named They-Det-Tull was chased hy fourteen large timber wolves while going over his trap line twenty miles west of Carmacks.

  • January 16, 1925: The Wann River Power Plant is running in good form and at night the buildings are all illuminated, giving the place the appearance of a small sized city. Five men are stationed at Wann River with W. Roxborough, of Atlin, in charge.
  • January 16, 1925: A kitchen shower was given in honor of Miss J. B. Milne at the home of Mrs. Al. Stewart on Thursday evening last. Thirty-four ladies were present. The evening was spent in needlework, music and games.
  • January 16, 1925: Among the offerings at W. A. Puckett's store: a set of 6 fruit knives for $9.00, Pyrex tea pots for $3.00, and 17-jewel Waltham watches with 25-year cases for $35.00.

  • January 23, 1925: In Vancouver, a number of prominent business men have met for the purpose of organizing the big game hunting resources of Western Canada. A large amount of capital is available for the purpose of establishing hunting lodges at some of the most suitable places in the west, and the founders of the movement have Yukon in mind as one of the first places to establish a hunting lodge.
  • January 23, 1925: The weather report shows all stations clear and calm, with Hootalinqua at 60 below, Selkirk 68 below, Dawson 60 below and Whitehorse 46 below.
  • January 23, 1925: The work being carried on at Keno by small operators is away in excess of last year. Pickering and Britton have done remarkably well. The Yukon-Treadwell mill is running and will be quite a boon to the camp. Mr. Wernecke will buy the ore from the small operators which will be of great assistance to them.

  • January 30, 1925: Atlin has its first radio. The 5-tube Neutrodyne set was installed at the Kootenay Hotel by Will Roxborough.
  • January 30, 1925: The storm and snow on the Summit has brought about the temporary suspension of the train service between here and Skagway and the horse drawn stage service between Yukon Crossing and Dawson was suspended by order of the police authorities until such time as the weather moderates sufficiently to make it safe for the horses to travel.
  • January 30, 1925: Enquiries are being made as to the best way of reaching the Dease Lake Country. The Star correspondent is advised that during the winter travelling is by far the safer via Carcross and Atlin to Telegraph Creek than via Wrangell and up the Stickine River.

February

  • February 6, 1925: first edition with the title "The Whitehorse Star".

    The Whitehorse Star, February 6, 1925

  • February 6, 1925: After a year of uncertainty, it is announced that the Old Log Church will not be torn down. Bishop Bompas frequently preached at the church and Robert Service was a member and official of the church.
  • February 6, 1925: Severe weather has caused delays in train and stage service of late. Telegraphic communication, with some interruption because of the wires being down, has kept us in touch with affairs on the outside, and some of our citizens have listened to the news, lectures and concerts over the radio. Dawson and Mayo have been even more fortunate because of the splendid service available through the wireless stations.

  • February 13, 1925: From all reports Cam Smith is having a real time in the sunny south. With his sister, Deyo, he made an auto trip as far south as Tejunia, Texas. All along the line he reports a most enjoyable outing, and the interest and pleasure of the journey has been added to by the meeting of several old friends from the North.
  • February 13, 1925: Pussy willows were brought into town last week. Although this sounds yery much like a Vancouver news item it is really true.
  • February 13, 1925: The school report for January shows Jackie Weise in Grade IV to be the top student, at 94%. Albert Taylor, also Grade IV, was at 92%, as was Aline Cyr, in Grade VI.

  • February 20, 1925: On January 13th, the Motor ship Hayesport No. 2 left Vietoria with a cargo of 50 tons of powder and combustibles, the bulk of which was consigned to the Treadwell Yukon Co. and the Engineer Mine. On Tuesday morning a wire was received stating that some cases of gasoline marked M. Watson, Carcross, had been found floating in Milbank Sound and it is believed that the Motor Ship was lost. [the spelling is incorrect - it was the Haysport No. 2, and she was indeed lost with all hands]
  • February 20, 1925: News from Mayo: The Treadwell Yukon Company's New Reduction Mill is operating very satisfactorily with dailyecapacity of over 100 tons. Many individual miners are taking out shipping ore on Keno and Galena Hills. There are no idle men in Mayo.
  • February 20, 1925: Along Lynn Canal the snowfall is heavier than it has been since the winter of 1917-1918, and the deer are reported to be dying in hundreds of starvation. Volunteers have been called for to cut brush for them to feed upon.

  • February 27, 1925: One of the most severe earthquakes ever felt at Anchorage rocked buildings for 19 1-2 seconds on February 20th. There were two distinct tremors. Dishes were broken in many homes. Patients in the Anchorage Hospital were shaken out of their beds. All clocks stopped at nearby Curry.
  • February 27, 1925: It is unfortunate that no powder is now available for individual miners in the Mayo area. The Treadwell Yukon Company have been good enough to furnish powder up to the present, but now have none to spare. It is hoped that arrangements may be made for a permanent and dependable powder supply for Mayo, otherwise mining development will be greatly retarded.
  • February 27, 1925: According to the advance bookings and announcements of the summer schedules of the various Steamship Lines operating between Skagway and the ports of Vancouver and Seattle, the passenger business for 1925 should exceed that of any previous year, and Whitehorse, Dawson, Atlin, and Skagway should prepare for a Banner Tourist season.

March

  • March 6, 1925: The powder and gasoline arriving in Skagway on the Nebesna, was brought over on Special Powder Train Monday, 82 tons of explosives being consigned to Carcross and 41 tons to Whitehorse. One of the 10 Ton Tractors left early Wednesday a.m., to hurry a load of powder through to Mayo as soon as possible.
  • March 6, 1925: Sergt. and Mrs. A. C. Head, and daughters Elliot and Dorothy, leave Whitehorse Friday morning. Sergt. Head came to the Yukon in August, 1899, as a member of the R. N. W. M. P., being first stationed at Tagish Post, and then at Lake Linderman on the Chilkoot Trail, until that trail was closed in November 1899.
  • March 6, 1925: Bernard Marsch, who was scalded two years ago by a thawing machine, died at Dawson Hospital on March 3rd.

  • March 13, 1925: The Coast papers have been devoting much space to the expected stampede to the Dease Lake country. In a Vancouver Daily of February 23rd, we read that the Princess Mary sailing on February 21st had her accommodations filled with stampeders who were rushing to Dease Lake via Carcross and Atlin. Upon arrival at Skagway, however, only Atlin residents were bound for that community.
  • March 13, 1925: Word was received on the last Princess that J. R. "Radio Joe" Mathews was injured in New Westminster some time ago by collision with a streetcar. He was in a hospital for 10 days, but is now reported to be almost fully recovered.
  • March 13, 1925: Charles F. Jahn, at one time Harbormaster at Skagway for the Seattle Clipper Line, died recently in Seattle. While in that position, he is credited with having landed the first locomotive and railroad coaches ever brought to Alaska. They were delivered for the White Pass Railroad in 1899.

  • March 20, 1925: Today's incoming stage at Atlin brought Mr. Brinker, a well known mining Engineer who is to take charge of the operations at Engineer Mine; also Mr. Reece from Ottawa, who is on his way to the Dease Lake country.
  • March 20, 1925: At 5 p.m. on Thursday last, a long blast from the White Pass Shipyard whistle, accompanied by the combined Foxtown and Whitehorse malemute chorus, with Joe Williams' comedians taking the tenor part, and Bruno Watson, Mutt Whitney and Scout Sansom pulling a little bass, announced the beginning of another operating season. One thing we are proud of in Whitehorse is our malemute chorus. We maintain that we have the best and huskiest warblers north of fifty three.
  • March 20, 1925: "Klondike Kate." In a recent copy of Portland Canal News, Stewart, B. C., we read that Miss Kate Ryan won the prize for "Most Original Costume", at a masquerade dance. Citizens of Whitehorse who lived here before the year 1919, will recall that Kate Ryan never missed a prize at the costume balls, and several of the other prize winners were usually costumed by her.

  • March 27, 1925: Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Williams have taken over the management of the Commercial Hotel, and are already laying plans for the renovation of this popular hostelry. From 1909-1918 they operated the Lower LeBarge Roadhouse, and are well and favorably known to Yukoners.
  • March 27, 1925: With the departure of Police Magistrate and Mrs. J. Langlois Bell, who left today for Victoria, the Yukon is losing one of her oldest and best known families. J. L. Bell came to the Yukon as Asst. Gold Commissioner in January 1900, accompanied by the late Sheriff R. J. Eilbeck, and made the trip trom Bennett to Dawson with Police teams. When they passed the present site of Whitehorse, the only buildings in evidence were the Telegraph Office across the river, and a tent roadhouse.
  • March 27, 1925: Col. James A. Fairborn, General Agent of the W. P. & Y. R. at Mayo, has been the week end guest of T. C. Richards, leaving for Mayo on Tuesday's Overland Stage. He is looking fine, but says he would be in better shape if he had not run across T. C. Richards in Vancouver.

April

  • April 3, 1925: On Saturday night the Whitehorse Curling Club brought to a happy and fitting close what may well be called the most successful season of its history. Eighty curlers and friends met at the City Cafe for a dinner-bridge.
  • April 3, 1925: O. F. Kastner, successor to Coates & Kastner, operates a weekly stage on the Dawson-Whitehorse Winter Trail for the Royal Mail, passengers, freight, and express.
  • April 3, 1925: Between Mayo and Keno O. S. Lanning and M. S. McGowan each have a truck operating for passenger and freight service. The Treadwell-Yukon mine is four miles distant from Keno and most of the passenger traffic between these two points is on foot.

  • April 17, 1925: Dawson turned out en masse to see the finish of the dog race from Bear Creek to Dawson, a distance of eight miles. The winner was Dave Roberts, who made the distance in 45 minutes. Miss Phyllis Lee came second in 48 minutes.
  • April 17, 1925: J. Baker, of Whitehorse, made a hurried trip to Dawson by dog team to visit his four children in St. Paul's Hostel.
  • April 17, 1925: Hance Stewart, who for some time had been suffering from kidney and bladder trouble, passed away at the hospital here on Monday, April 13th. Read the entire article here.

  • April 24, 1925: In Carmacks, George R. Brown's herd of cattle has been increased by seven head during the month, and Frank H. Back's fox ranch reports four silver litters to date, with seven pair yet to hear from.
  • April 24, 1925: Captain Moorhead and Constable Cruikshanks returned to Dawson Tuesday from Fortymile, travelling by dog train. They report the trail in good condition.
  • April 24, 1925: W. L. Phelps spent the week end at Carcross getting his launch in shape for the summer season.

May

  • May 1, 1925: Chief Isaac, of Moosehide, appeared before the Yukon Council and with considerable eloquence asked that a bounty be placed on coyotes and wolverine.
  • May 1, 1925: Now that it has been demonstrated at Mayo that individual miners can work their own properties and make good returns mining operations there will be carried on more vigorously than ever.
  • May 1, 1925: Mrs. C. M. Coghlan returned to town on Monday, making the trip by stage from Crooked Creek, where she and Captain Coghlan had spent the winter. The Captain had charge of the mail route from Crooked Creek to Mayo.

  • May 8, 1925: On April 30th. Mr. McAdam gave a very interesting demonstration of his electrically-powered astronomical models in the Presbyterian Church at Dawson. One model showed the movements of the earth causing the seasons and causing day and night. The other showed the movement of some of the planets around the sun.
  • May 8, 1925: Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Cates, who arrived in town on Friday last, have taken up their residence in the cabin just west of the school. Mr. Cates is a member of the Casca crew.
  • May 8, 1925: A petition bearing the signatures of 353 people was presented to the Yukon Council asking for the appropriation of $15,000 for the Hunker-Dominion road. After being refused funds for roads, the Treadwell-Yukon Company spent $44,422.66 on roads themselves.

  • May 15, 1925: The river opened here at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, May 9th. This is the latest opening on record. The ice moved at Dawson at 8.14 a.m. the same day.
  • May 15, 1925: The O. F. Kastner Royal Mail Stage was unable to continue the trip north owing to the extremely high water this side of Little River. On the return they encountered water at the Nine Mile, and from there in the drivers had to walk.
  • May 15, 1925: A report from Edmonton is that fire practically destroyed Mayo last Saturday night. Just as we go to press the report comes from Seattle that Letourneau's hotel at Mayo was destroyed by fire. That latter report seems more likely.

  • May 22, 1925: That Yukon is coming back is evidenced by three new business places opened or about to be opened in Whitehorse. Mrs. Stewart has already opened and is doing a nice business in ladies' and children's wear. The Wilson Tea Rooms will be opened for business on Saturday morning. W. H. Simpson is preparing to open with a stock of confectionery and tobaccos. The business will be under the capable management of Miss Virginia Harbottle.
  • May 22, 1925: D. A. Muirhead and W. A. Puckett are certainly deserving of credit for the valiant fight they are putting up for the extermination of the mosquito. The response to the appeal for help and funds for this purpose has however been rather disappointing.
  • May 22, 1925: The northbound mail of last week was brought back and taken down over the ice to connect with the Steamer Canadian.

  • May 29, 1925: The White Pass have all hoats in the water and practically in readiness for the season's operations. The capacity of the Whitehorse has been increased by ten staterooms and the dining room has been enlarged and beautifully panelled.
  • May 29, 1925: The annual celebration on Saturday last was a decided success in every particular. The weather was ideal for the occasion and the number of people coming by train was in excess of that of last year.
  • May 29, 1925: Mr. and Mrs. George P. Mackenzie arrived in town late Tuesday night on the O. F. Kastner Royal Mail Stage. They came by launch from Dawson to Yukon Crossing and are on their way to Ottawa, where they will reside.

June

  • June 5, 1925: With this issue The Whitehorse Star begins its Twenty-fifty year. Several men have been at the helm during that time. It has seen worse days and it may have seen better days than those of the present. The present is good and the outlook is bright. Our Special Twenty-fifth Anniversary Edition is now ready for distribution.
  • June 5, 1925: Twenty-four head of beef cattle came in by last Friday‚Äôs train for P. Burns & Company. They have been shipped to Mayo.
  • June 5, 1925: Another old timer and splendid type of citizen left for the outside Friday morning. George Stevens came here in 1900 and has been engaged in prospecting and mining in this section of the country almost continuously ever since. He has not visited the outside since coming here. In June last year he was stricken with paralysis, and has been in the hospital since. A daughter in Michigan is bringing him there.

  • June 12, 1925: The Tennis Club at Dawson has decided upon a board court owing to the changeable conditions of the ground, and a meeting has been called for the purpose of organizing a golf club.
  • June 12, 1925: The wonderful showing on Galena Hill is causing considerable excitement at Mayo. Every inch of ground has been staked and applied for, and recording fees are pouring into the office. It is generally conceded that this hill will prove highly productive.
  • June 12, 1925: For some time The Star office has been a very busy place but this week has been the busiest yet in the experience of the present management. Owing to pressure of job printing the paper this week has been neglected.

  • June 19, 1925: Emile Martin turned up at Slate Creek after wandering the hills for eighteen days.
  • June 19, 1925: The Treadwell-Yukon Company Limited has purchased the Yukon sawmill on Duncan Creek and will shortly start operations on the season's cut.
  • June 19, 1925: Dr. W. E. Cockfield's geological survey party arrived in Atlin on June 9th. They have visited Mr. Ruffner's property at the Fourth of July, and are now to make a survey of the Telegraph Creek district. The party consists of seven men and an outfit of 14 pack horses.

  • June 26, 1925: At a meeting held in the N.S.A.A. Hall on Tuesday evening the Whitehorse Golf Club was organized with about twenty members. The membership fee is $10 for men and ladies free. The golf course willl be on the Aviation Ground where considerable work has already been done.
  • June 26, 1925: A most unfortunate accident occurred at Mayo on June 23rd, when Fred Fulman, an employee in Lesperance's sawmill, lost one leg and had the other almost severed. The accident occurred by his coming in contact with the circular saw while in full motion.
  • June 26, 1925: Conditions at Atlin are good. Mining operations are being carried on more extensively than they have been for years. The population is showing a substantial increase and everybody is busy.

July

  • July 3, 1925: The recent rains and warm weather at Dawson are bringing the gardens along rapidly. Probably due to the change in the weather, however, an epidemic of colds has struck the town.
  • July 3, 1925: On Tuesday last a rather serious accident occurred on the road to Champagne. Frank Sketch and two Indians, Jack Allen and Jimmy Joe, were engaged in hauling freight for the Jacquot Brothers when they broke through the bridge over the Desadeash River.
  • July 3, 1925: George R. Dedman, one of the oldest and most highly respected citizens of Skagway, passed away on Saturday evening, June 27th, after a brief illness from pneumonia. For years Mr. Dedman has been proprietor of the Golden North Hotel.

  • July 10, 1925: The Star staff has been under the weather for over a week and what little work has been done has been done under difficulty. One of the many difficulties with which we have to contend is the lack of help, for untrained help around a printing office is of no value.
  • July 10, 1925: Cam Smith's twelve passenger car arrived at Dawson on the Steamer Whitehorse, and within an hour after its arrival was in use showing tourists around. Three tourists recently missed the trail between Dawson and the Dome and were out all night.
  • July 10, 1925: C. H. Baxter returned home on Wednesday, bringing with him a car of horses to be used with his hunting parties this summer

  • July 17, 1925: "The midnight trips to Llewellyn Glacier being conducted by Paul Eggert, of Atlin, with the Launch 'Atlinto,' are proving very popular with the tourists. Two or three trips are made each week, and the marvellous colorings seen from the Glacier at sunrise are beyond description."
  • July 17, 1925: Mink ranching at Tagish is very promising. Four new ranches will be established this fall.
  • July 17, 1925: G. N. Shaw has purchased the Miss Ryan house and is making some improvements to the interior before moving in. A few more men with the courage and enterprise of Mr. Shaw would make quite a difference to the town and Territory.

  • July 24, 1925: At a time near the zenith of the historic Dawson City, Grace E. Wilson was born on May 8th, 1908. Miss Wilson has now been honored by being the choice of the Loyal Order of Moose as their candidate for exhibition Queen in connection with the Vancouver Exhibition.
  • July 24, 1925: Among the furs brought by the Steamer Thistle from Ross River were some twenty of the largest black timber wolves ever seen in Yukon. These animals are increasing in number but are not a consideration in comparison to the coyotes.
  • July 24, 1925: Ad: "Private Teacher Wanted. To teach four children at Carmacks. Will pay 850 a month and board. For further particulars apply to E. S. Thayer, Carmacks."

  • July 31, 1925: A poem by Robert W. Service, "Bob Smart's Dream," was published. Read it here.
  • July 31, 1925: Articles about tourism, the Days of '98 show in particular, and arguments against the Beer Ordinance, replaced regular news in this issue.

August

  • August 7, 1925: Chief Boss passed away in camp at the Whitehorse Rapids on Friday, July 31st. Deceased was said to be about ninety-five years old. The remains were taken to Little River for burial. His son, Jim Boss, will be in town toward the end of the week when he hopes to receive from friends of his deceased father some assistance in connection with the expenses of burial.
  • August 7, 1925: A total of 165 members of the Knight Templars of Pittsburg, the largest uniformed Commandery in the world, visited Whitehorse on August 5th. In the evening the party left on the Steamers Casca and Dawson.
  • August 7, 1925: On August 24th the electors of Yukon are to vote for or against the sale of beer in licensed premises. Never will the sacred right of citizenship be exercised upon a more important question. In view of the appalling evidence recently brought to light in The Star the Beer Ordinance should be overwhelmingly defeated.

  • August 14, 1925: The Twenty-fifth Anniversary number of The Whitehorse Star, to be known in future as the Yukon Tourist Annual, is meeting with a splendid reception and is doing great missionary work for Yukon. This publication will appear once a year and one dollar will pay the subscription for four years.
  • August 14, 1925: The north trip increases in popularity as it becomes more widely known. Additional coast boats were required this season to handle the traffic, and present indications are that still more will be required next year.
  • August 14, 1925: Frank Sketch left Thursday for Vancouver for the purpose of being fitted with glasses. He has made a good recovery from his recent operation.

  • August 21, 1925: Bishop Stringer has issued a letter to the congregations throughout the Diocese expressing his anxiety for the defeat of the beer legislation.
  • August 21, 1925: The Telegraph Line Gang, in charge of Ed. Morrison, passed through Carmacks last week enroute for Yukon Crossing.
  • August 21, 1925: While motoring to Carcross on Monday evening John A. McLaren of the Customs staff here, met with an unfortunate and painful accident about eight miles this side of Carcross. Experiencing some trouble with the car Mr. McLaren was working underneath and using a torch which ignited the gasoline.

  • August 28, 1925: In a plebiscite on August 24th, southern Yukon communities voted in favour of abolishing liquor, and bars and saloons with liquor licenses.
  • August 28, 1925: Twenty-five years ago on Sunday the Old Log Church of Whitehorse was opened for Divine Service, being dedicated to the founder of the Christian Faith Himself, and known as Christ Church.
  • August 28, 1925: Miss Kate Martin is back at her post in the Carcross School and Miss Sybil left last week to open the Carmacks School.

September

  • September 4, 1925: News was received here Saturday of the death of Gertrude Isabel Macpherson, beloved wife of Percy Reid, Acting Gold Commissioner of Yukon Territory. Mrs. Reid passed away at 10:30 Friday night, August 28th, in St. Mary's hospital, Dawson. Mrs. Reid was born in Chatham, Ontario, where she was married in December 1905, coming to Whitehorse shortly afterward. Interment will be made in Vancouver.
  • September 4, 1925: On Tuesday telegraphic service to the outside was re-established via Telegraph Creek. This service was discontinued on March 23rd to give a trial to the radio service in the hope of reducing the cost of operation. The radio was too uncertain to insure good service with the result that the old line has been re-opened.
  • September 4, 1925: W. H. Simpson left on Sunday to take a position at the Engineer Mine. The Company have a big building programme in preparation of extensive mining operations. On September 1st, a post office was opened at the mine, to be known as Engineer. This is another indication of the permanency of the camp. Frank McPhee is the postmaster.

  • September 11, 1925: The Steamer Keno arrived and departed at Mayo yesterday, bringing nine passengers and a heavy cargo of freight. Leaving on the Keno were three mining engineers, Cram, Greenland and Lewis, who have been investigating the mining possibilities of the district. They are very favorably impressed with the outlook and will return next spring to continue their work.
  • September 11, 1925: The six pupils writing from the Whitehorse High School on the Middle School Examinations - Carl Chambers, Dorothy Phelps, John Scott, Fraser Watson, Florence Cunningham and Mabel Sansom - have made a splendid showing. Superintendent of Education S. R. Tompkins has written congratulating Miss Bissett and the pupils upon the exceptionally strong showing of the class.
  • September 11, 1925: The staff of Chooutla Indian school at Carcross recently tendered a reception to Rev. and Mrs. Bagshaw. Several of the townspeople were present to welcome Mr. and Mrs. Bagshaw, and the evening was a most enjoyable one.

  • September 18, 1925: Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Cason and Mr. and Mr. and Mrs. Reg. V. Waters, of Miami, Florida, spent Sunday in Whitehorse, guests at the Regina Hotel. Mr. Waters told The Star that one of the most aggressive and successful business men in Miami is an old Yukoner, Eugene C. Stahl, and that he never ceases to tell the people of Florida of the wonders of Yukon.
  • September 18, 1925: On Sunday, September 12th, while on a vist to the Shamrock Mineral Claim at Mayo, John Lude, foreman for the Treadwell-Yukon Company, died of heart failure. Mr. Lude was a resident of Yukon for many years, having been for a long time in the employ of the Yukon Gold Company at Dawson.
  • September 18, 1925: On September 19th, a serious accident occurred at the Engineer Mine, resulting in the death of Arthur Dale Knowlton, a mining engineer from Salt Lake City. With an assistant Mr. Knowlton was working in a raise taking out ore samples when he was knocked unconscious by a falling plank. He passed away that evening without regaining consciousness. Mr. Knowiton was about forty-five years of age and leaves to mourn his wife and three children.

  • September 25, 1925: Necessary repairs are being made on the Mayo-Keno road in anticipation of heavy traffic this winter. The Treadwell-Yukon Company are using the Tractor and Grader and Chas. Rankin has a crew at work on the cut-off.
  • September 25, 1925: The Whitehorse-Dawson mail contract has been awarded to Messrs Greenfield & Pickering.
  • September 25, 1925: R. H. Hunter-Weston returned last week from a very successful and pleasant hunting trip. Mr. Hunter-Weston's home is in Timaru, New Zealand, and he came to Yukon in search of big game and health. In game he secured everything he went after and he is returning home fully restored in health.

October

  • October 2, 1925: Alf. Dickson, of Tagish, recently shipped sixty-five live mink to Juneau. A new mink ranch is being started near Mendenhall Glacier.
  • October 2, 1925: Jack Ward is taking charge of the Government Telegraph Office at Selkirk, and R. Gooding goes to Stewart River. The exchange was made to permit the children of Mr. and Mrs. Ward to attend school.
  • October 2, 1925: Messrs Greenfield & Pickering have purchased the equipment of O. F. Kastner and are making preparations for starting the winter mail service. J. E. Greenfield will be in charge at Whitehorse and Angus McIntyre at Dawson.

  • October 9, 1925: On September 23rd, 1921, Joseph W. Wilson and Frank X. Dumontier were drowned in Five Finger Rapids. The remains of Mr. Dumontier were recovered some two years later, but no trace was found of Mr. Wilson's body until a few days ago when H. O. Lokken, while moose hunting in the vicinity of Yukon Crossing, found what turned out to be his remains.
  • October 9, 1925: On Friday morning, October 2nd, Carmacks received a shock when it became known that Hazel Victoria Brown, beloved wife of George R. Brown, had passed away overnight. She was in good health and spirits before retiring Thursday night, and it is the opinion of friends that death was caused by a ruptured blood vessel brought on by coughing.
  • October 9, 1925: Two lunatics, Thomas Powers and Edward Moreau, were brought up from Dawson this week in charge of Constable Scaife. They left for the outside today in charge of Const. J. R. Purdie and special constable Kearns.

  • October 16, 1925: The first overland mail of the season left for Dawson early Wednesday morning. The truck is being used as far as Yukon Crossing and is in charge of Oliver Wilson. From the Crossing on teams will be used.
  • October 16, 1925: S. Andrew paid a friendly visit to The Star on Monday evening. He is on his way to the outside after spending the summer on the lower river as a member of the Steamer Yukon crew. Mr. Andrew does considerable writing for newspapers.
  • October 16, 1925: Another lengthy editorial b J. D. Skinner defends The Star's position against Robert Lowe in the upcoming federal election.

  • October 23, 1925: Dawson is experiencing ideal weather and the most open fall in years. Some second crop has been harvested. No snow or ice has yet appeared and the first sign of frost was Tuesday night. The tennis court is still being used. Whooping cough, however, has been the cause of a falling off in the school attendance.
  • October 23, 1925: The Treadwell-Yukon Company are constructing a new road on the Mayo side of Minto Bridge by which many winter glaciers will be avoided as well as the glacier hill grade all of which is a step in the right direction.
  • October 23, 1925: A school has been opened in Selkirk in the fine cabin of Major Armstrong, kindly loaned by him for that purpose. Ten children are in attendance with Miss Pauline White, of Dawson, as teacher.

  • October 30, 1925: George Black won the election for the Yukon M.P., defeating Robert Lowe.
  • October 30, 1925: On Tuesday W. L. Phelps was elected to the Yukon Council by acclamation. From the moment it became known that Robert Lowe had resigned from the Council it was generally hoped that Mr. Phelps would accept the nomination. He has had previous Council experience and will make a strong acquisition to that body.
  • October 30, 1925: Asa result of a partial stroke of a few years ago, and from which he never recovered, Edwin W. Gideon passed away at his home in Carcross early Tuesday evening. Mr. and. Mrs. Gideon came in over the Dyea trail in '98. Read this article and more about the Gideons here.

November

  • November 6, 1925: On November 9th the Yukon Chapter Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire will distribute Vetcraft Poppies. Besides serving as the Flower of Remembrance, every poppy replica is the handiwork of a veteran whose war disability precludes him from engaging in normal activities. The men employed in Vetcraft and Red Cross workshops have faced the choice of idleness as compared with using the impaired faculties which are a legacy to them from war disabilities.
  • November 6, 1925: Sealed tenders will be received up to noon on Saturday, November 14th, for supplying the Whitehorse General Hospital with 80 cords of 4-foot wood and 12 cords of 16-foot wood. Wood to be standing dry or stripped seasoned.
  • November 6, 1925: On Saturday last Joe Henry appeared before Inspector Bruce, J.P., charged with being drunk, and was fined $5 and the costs of the court. Joe informed the court that he purchased the liquor from F. Mayer-Leason, against whom a charge of selling liquor to an Indian was laid. The accused plead guilty and was given four months.

  • November 13, 1925: The Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire gave a very successful Armistice Dance in the Pioneer Hall at Mayo on the evening ov November 9th. The attendance was unusually large. The music was furnished by Mayo's newly organized orchestra, appearing in public for the first time.
  • November 13, 1925: The manner in which a number of citizens turned out to complete the work on the curling rink gives but a slight idea of the interest being taken in the game this season. Curling is keeping pace with the general advancement of the town. The population of Whitehorse will be greater this winter than it has been for years. Several families prefer to spend the winter here rather than go outside.
  • November 13, 1925: At a recent meeting in Hawaii of the Honolulu Business and Professional Women's Club, held at Judge Sanford B. Dole's home, Mrs. Louise Armstrong gave a lecture on Alaska and the Yukon, illustrated with 180 colored slides by professional photographers.

  • November 20, 1925: New York investors have organized $1,000,000 for the development of the Kirtland Gold Mine on Taku Arm, adjoining the Engineer Gold Mine. Stock of the Engineer mine recently soared from $5 a share to over $100, and the same formation runs through the Kirtland property.
  • November 20, 1925: The Mayo radio station is functioning very satisfactorily since the recent additions and adjustments to the equipment were made by Lieut. Tabor. It is believed the former troubles if not wholly removed are greatly minimized.
  • November 20, 1925: George Yoshida. left Wednesday for Japan. He plans to return next year in time for the tourist business.

  • November 27, 1925: The closing of the rivers this season has been unusally late. The reason of course is the remarkably fine spell of weather through which we have just passed. Last week the Stewart, Yukon and Tahkina rivers were still open and at these points canoes and boats had to be used in transferring mail and passengers.
  • November 27, 1925: The airplane from Fairbanks was expected to arrive in Dawson on Tuesday but had to return to Fairbanks for repairs. The trip was being made in connection with a deal for the siphons of the Yukon Gold Company.
  • November 27, 1925: To provide additional hotel accommodation in Mayo, Oscar Letorneau will open the Broadway Hotel on December 1st. Mr. Letorneau purposes erecting a new hotel next year on the site of the one destroyed by fire last spring.

December

  • December 4, 1925: Charles Brefalt and Dan Tolmie have opened up a wonderful lead on Galena Hill below Dr. W. E. Thompson's group of claims. They have a nine foot lead with only one wall yet reached. The average across the nine foot face is over 250 ounces per ton.
  • December 4, 1925: The B. C. Legislature adopted a motion seeking to authorize the use of the lash on men convicted of the sale of narcotic drugs. Attorney-General Manson later declared that drastic measures were needed to stamp out the drug evil because imprisonment had proved to be insufficient.
  • December 4, 1925: On Friday last Constable Blatta brought from Carcross several Indians charged with infractions of the Liquor Ordinance. Appearing before Inspector Bruce, J. P., two of the number were fined $5 and costs for being intoxicated, and two were fined 325 and costs for having intoxicants in their possessivn.

  • December 11, 1925: J. E. Pickering arrived in Mayo Wednesday evening on the Greenfield & Pickering Royal Mail Stage. Mr. Pickering is making a trip of inspection over the trail with a view to increasing the efficiency of the mail service. He says that con- ditions generally in Whitehorse are better than they have been for years.
  • December 11, 1925: On Saturday last J. D. Richards sawed ten cords of wood in one hour. Mr. Richards says this is the best time he has yet made with his machine.
  • December 11, 1925: The B.C. Minister of Mines is running a large display ad extolling the virtues of the province for mining investment.

  • December 18, 1925: Percy Reid, former Chief Controller of Chinese Immigration and Division Commissioner of the Pacific Coast, was appointed Gold Commissioner on December 12th.
  • December 18, 1925: On Monday evening, Fred Eliason, an employee of the railway for years, married Miss Winnifred Brooks who was visiting from Montreal. The next day, he went to the roundhouse, telling his wife he would be back shortly. He never returned, and tracks on the ice make it appear that he went into the river. Ready the entire lengthy article, and the conclusion, here.
  • December 18, 1925: For some time past The Whitehorse Star has been favored with more business than it could comfortably take care of. The rush was due largely to orders coming in for job printing required in a hurry. Everything within our power has been done to give service, but we are now several days behind.

  • December 25, 1925: On December 16th, Oliver Wilson was the victim of a nasty accident eight miles south of Carmacks. He was going north with Charles Troughton and the tractor turned over. Oliver received a severe injury to the right eye. He returned home from Carmacks and is making very satisfactory progress.
  • December 25, 1925: Eating persimmons in Yukon is something out of the ordinary, yet such was the delicacy The Star man had for breakfast Tuesday morning through the kindness of Mrs. W. A. Puckett. Archie Smith had sent a number of them from Long Beach to his mother here.
  • December 25, 1925: Three-quarters of page 2 is taken up by appeals for subscriptions.

1926

January

  • January 1, 1926: In 1924, J. D. Skinner was told to not waste his time trying to re-establish The Whitehorse Star, but he is very glad that he did.
  • January 1, 1926: December 1925 gave Yukon the best December weather within the memory of its oldest residents. Only once during the month did thermometer register below zero and then only 12 degrees. The following day it was 40 above.
  • January 1, 1926: Jim Breaden and Tom Davis have made another record trip with the caterpillar tractor from Pelly Crossing to Little River. They left Pelly at 3 a.m. on Saturday last with the mail and three passengers, and they reached Little River at 2 p.m. on Monday.

  • January 8, 1926: The town received a shock on Thursday morning when a telephone message from the Dam brought the news that Sid Frank had been drowned while taking soundings at the Dam. Read the entire article, and another from April 24th when his body was found, here.
  • January 8, 1926: J. F. Collins, formerly superintendent at the Engineer Mine, was buried in Vancouver on December 23rd. Cancer was the cause of death.
  • January 8, 1926: The Treadwell-Yukon Company Camp expects to have both curling and hockey under way this season. The hockey equipment is already on the way to Keno. The curling stones have arrived in Whitehorse and will be shipped to Keno by the first stage.

  • January 15, 1926: The exceptionally mild weather and lack of snow is causing some anxiety at Mayo. Several of the individual operators are speeding up by increasing their crews in order to get as much ore as possible to Mayo Landing before the break-up. The Treadwell-Yukon Company is operating double shift with the tractors.
  • January 15, 1926: The Whitehorse Star has created a fund whereby on June 1st, 1950, the fiftieth anniversary of the paper's founding, $1,000 will be handed to The Star subscriber who has accumulated the most points, with points given for subscriptions, renewals, and new subscribers secured.
  • January 15, 1926: C. H. Johnston has been assisting C. H. Baxter with the erection of pens on the Baxter fox ranch. The work was completed Wednesday and on Thursday Mr. Baxter moved his foxes into their new home.

  • January 22, 1926: Drs. Franks and Snider returned to Yukon on Friday last. They have opened dental parlors in town opposite the City Cafe.
  • January 22, 1926: Death recently occurred near Nakusp, B.C. of William Horkan. Deceased came over the Chilkoot Pass during the Klondike rush and lived in Yukon for many years. He was at one time gardener at the Government House, Dawson.
  • January 22, 1926: This year's expedition of the Canadian Government Steamship Arctic was in charge of George P. Mackenzie. The Arctic left Quebec on July 1st, carried out her patrol duties, visited and supplied all the old police posts, landed materials for a new one, and returned to her home port without mishap on October 10th.

  • January 29, 1926: John Smith, a pioneer miner of Sulphur Creek, is dead as the result of a gun battle with several of the mounted police. Smith had been reported as acting strangely and in a manner dangerous to life.
  • January 29, 1926: All seven patients in the Mayo hospital are making good progress.
  • January 29, 1926: The historic city of Dawson could and should be made one of the big tourist attractions of Canada. The cost would not be heavy and the returns would be handsome. The up-river trip from Dawson to Whitehorse could be made the outstanding feature of this wonderful northern outing.

February

  • February 5, 1926: Mining operations at Mayo are being carried on upon a steadily increasing scale. All ore producers are employing as many men as can be worked to advantage, and running at full capacity. Conditions and indications improve as development work proceeds.
  • February 5, 1926: With new directors in place at the Richmond Consolidated Mining Company, plans are being given consideration for immediate commencement of operations on the company's Yukon-Pueblo mine at Whitehorse.
  • February 5, 1926: Greenfield & Pickering are experimenting with a snowmobile. J.E. Greenfield and Fred Vey are making a trial trip to Braeburn. If found satisfactory two snowmobiles may be used in the mail service.

  • February 12, 1926: Just as we go to press this morning word comes over the wire that the northbound stage went over the four-mile hill north of Carmacks. Harbottle, Wilson, A. G. Bowie and Dr. Franks are reported as having eseaped without injury, but Dr. Snider was under the load. Bowie ran back to Carmacks for help.
  • February 12, 1926: R. H. "Bob" Palmer and Harry Parker arrived here from Keno last Saturday with Chas. Troughton on the Burns tractor. Mr. Palmer had purchased a Fordson tractor to be used in his freighting operations between Mayo and Keno, and his mission here was for the purpose of taking the Fordson to Keno. The little giant was quickly unloaded and ready for the trail.
  • February 12, 1926: Lyle Geary of Whitehorse heard Viale Angelico of Rome, Italy, on his radio set, with good audibility.

  • February 19, 1926: Horace Rutherford, a member of the office staff at the Engineer Mine, has been missing since February 7th. Rutherford had left Engineer on skates to go to Ben-My-Chree, some twelve miles away, taking with him the mail for Mr. and Mrs. Partridge and Miss Dalton. He had been warned that the ice might not be safe but these warnings he disregarded. A search party has found no trace, with a light snow covering any tracks.
  • February 19, 1926: Charles Rankin and Eli Verreau were passengers for Whitehorse on the stage which left hMayo Tuesday. They will bring back the new caterpillar tractor for the Treadwell-Yukon Company Limited.
  • February 19, 1926: No better evidence of improved and improving conditions in Yukon, and particularly in Whitehorse, could be desired than the activity in real estate during the past twelve months. Quite a number of people have purchased homes during that period, and many owners have made substantial improvements.

  • February 26, 1926: In the Vancouver Province of February 6th is a splendid article by Prof. H. R. Trumpour. The heading is painfully appropriate. In sixteen words it tells the story of why this section of the country is not forging ahead with great rapidity. Here is the heading: "Yukon dreams of her golden past and waits hopefully for the turn of the tide of prosperity." Yukon has been dreaming and waiting instead of planning and working.
  • February 26, 1926: Charles Rankin and Eli Verreau arrived in town by the Burns tractor on Wednesday night, and Thursday they unloaded a new 10-ton Best caterpillar tractor for the Treadwell-Yukon Company Limited. This will make the fourth tractor in use by this company. Rankin and Verreau expect to leave on the return trip Sunday.
  • February 26, 1926: The Skagway hockey team and some twenty-tive supporters from Skagway and Chilkoot Barracks came in on tonight's train. A good hockey game is anticipated.

March

  • March 5, 1926: To re-establish The Whitehorse Star has been no easy task. Some people had come to the conclusion that this section of the country could not support a paper, while others were not satisfied with the kind of paper that the support available warranted. Under these conditions The Whitehorse Star has carried on for the past two years. A guessing contest currently under way, with the prize a 26-piece china tea set, hopes to bring in 200 new subscriptions at $5 each.
  • March 5, 1926: E. J. Hamacher is advertising a 5-tube radio set complete with aerial tubes, batteries and headset for $125, a 3-tube one for $90. He also sells radio parts including bus bars, spaghetti, condensors and tubes.
  • March 5, 1926: Any assistance given the Whitehorse Hockey Club in connection with their financial drive of a few weeks ago has been many times repaid by the splendid entertainment furnished by the boys during the week end of the hockey games with Skagway. The visitors have gone home with good opinions of Whitehorse and of the people of Whitehorse.

  • March 12, 1926: On February 25th, Charles H. Smith, who lived some twenty-five miles north of Fort Selkirk, was reported missing from his cabin. Constable Thornthwaite, of Carmacks, combed the district in search of the missing man and found him dead in the cellar of Harry Davis, a neighbor. Smith had been shot in the chest and the back of his head was smashed. Davis is under arrest and is reported to have made a confession.
  • March 12, 1926: Because of the increased amount of work the shipyard crew have been brought in earlier this year and in increased numbers. Wednesday's train brought in twenty-five men [their names are listed]. Yesterday the yard was bustling with activity. Many of the old boys have returned and are delighted to be back again. The new members of the crew are sure to like the town.
  • March 12, 1926: Many compliments have been paid this paper because of the practical, progressive and timely suggestions made in our issue of January 29th with regard to making a better and more permanent use of Dawson as an attraction for tourists. This issue discusses tourism promotion further, and includes a ballot to indicate support or not.

  • March 19, 1926: Ray Stewart is among the many who made money in Yukon. He is well provided for and last week he returned from the outside with two of his sons, C. F. and G. K., en route to his mining property at Mayo. He brought with him a compressor and a Fordson tractor. The Fordson has a special hoist attachment and will be used in running the compressor and hoisting ore.
  • March 19, 1926: Quite a nUmber of men are engaged in taking down the power line of the Yukon Gold Company Limited at Dawson.
  • March 19, 1926: Whitehorse is shortly to have another industry. Albert Allen is moving in from Arkell Lake and will start a mink ranch just north of town. He has twenty-four animals.

  • March 26, 1926: Active operation of Richmond Consolidated Mining Company's Pueblo and Tamarack-Carlisle properties will commence about April 1st, according to an announcement made recently at the offices of the company in Spokane. Clifton P. Seale, one of the most experienced mining executives along the coast, has been engaged by the company as mine superintendent.
  • March 26, 1926: Claude Irvine last week was advised by wire that arrangements had been completed for the resuming of operations on the Tally-Ho property in the Wheaton district. There is every indication that the Wheaton country is highly mineralized and many are of the opinion that before long extensive operations will be under way there.
  • March 26, 1926: Louis Schulz recently had a team drowned while hauling wood on Lake Atlin.

April

  • April 2, 1926: The Richmond Consolidated Mining Company has a diamond drilling crew from San Francisco on the way north. This crew, upon its arrival at Whitehorse, will start a vigorous campaign of diamond drilling on the Yukon-Pueblo property, as they have good geological evidence that in addition to the large Yukon-Pueblo deposit there are extensions of this occurrence which are probably as large if not larger bodies of copper ore.
  • April 2, 1926: Last year the river opened here at 2.40 p.m. on May 9th. This was said to be the latest opening on record. This year the river opened here on April Ist, and this is said to be the earliest on record. The winter throughout has been an exceptionally mild one.
  • April 2, 1926: George Yoshida returned yesterday from a visit to Japan. He reports a most enjoyable trip but is glad to get back.

  • April 24, 1926: Yesterday morning Charles Ennis discovered the body of a man in the river close to the mouth of Wolf Creek. The body was that of Sidney Bernard Frank, who lost his life through drowning at the Dam on January 7th last. His funeral was held this afternoon. Read this article and the one from January here.

  • April 9, 1926: Under the auspices of the Whitehorse Curling Club a bridge-supper was held in the City Cafe on Wednesday evening. About seventy-five people were in attendance. The chief purpose of the gathering was to wind up the business of the curling club for the season.
  • April 9, 1926: Another old Yukoner has passed away. Archie McKinnon of In- dian River died in St. Mary's hospital at Dawson this morning on his seventy-first birthday. The McKinnon brothers were the largest holders of the conglomerate properties.
  • April 9, 1926: John Anderson, George B. Williams and Ole Osheim arrived in town from San Francisco on Friday evening. They purpose spending the summer prospecting in Yukon. One of the great needs of the country at the present time is prospectors. Last year saw quite an increase and the opinion is freely expressed that from now on they will be coming in increasing numbers.

  • April 16, 1926: A list of 29 members of the B.Y.N. river service who arrived on Monday's train was published.
  • April 16, 1926: On Sunday evening a presentation was made to the Rt. Rev. I. O. Stringer, Bishop of Yukon, from the whole Diocese, to commemorate his twenty years service as bishop.
  • April 16, 1926: J. A. M. H. Maltby has resigned as Territorial Treasurer to take effect the end of June. An outside company has been after Maltby for some time and the change is of material advantage to himself. He has served fourteen years as Territorial Treasurer.
  • April 24, 1926: For the purpose of investigating the possibilities of filming the "Trail of '98" Alfred S. Rabach and Robert Newhart, representing a large picture corporation, spent a few weeks looking over the ground between here and Skagway. This week they visited Whitehorse.
  • April 24, 1926: Dawson is to be featured as one of the unique tourist attractions of Canada. The Yukon Order of Pioneers are behind the move. Instead of being an attraction for tourists Dawson has rather retarded the progress of the tourist business in this section. The appearance of the place seemed to depress visitors. A cleaning and brightening up it sorely needed.

  • April 30, 1926: The public meeting held in the N. S. A. A. Hall on Saturday evening was one of the largest and most enthusiastic gatherings of its kind held in town for years. May 22nd was chosen as the date for the annual celebration, holding a winter carnival is going to be studied, a tourist promotion committee was established, a report on mosquito control was presented, and May 19th was decided upon as clean-up day.
  • April 30, 1926: A most attractive and successful home cooking sale was held in the Taylor & Drury grocery department by Yukon Chapter I. O. D. E. last Friday, St. George's Day.
  • April 30, 1926: A request is made tom the many new boat crew members arriving to continue the consideration and hospitality which have gone a long way to popularizing the river trips.

May

  • May 7, 1926: That the mosquito nuisance at Whitehorse can be easily controlled is the pleasing and encouraging information given the Mosquito Committee in a lengthy letter from Prof. Hearle, of the Dominion Entomological Labratory at Indian Head, Saskatchewan. The solution is to spread oil on snowmelt pools where the mosquito larvae hatch.
  • May 7, 1926: In the passing of Mr. Charles J. McLennan at Vancouver on May 5th, Yukon loses one of its most highly respected pioneers. Coming north via the Stickine route in 1899, Mr. McLennan went north as far as Dawson. The following year he returned to Whitehorse where he resided continuously until moving to Vancouver in December 1924. He was in charge of government buildings in Whitehorse from 1902 until his departure.
  • May 7, 1926: The Bear Creek road at Dawson is being rebuilt by the Northwest Corporation in order to open more dredging ground.

  • May 14, 1926: In preparation for the rapidly growing tourist travel eighteen rooms will be added to the Atlin Inn. The material and men are on the way and work will begin at once. Tourist travel to Atlin this year will be the heaviest yet,
  • May 14, 1926: Major N. A. D. Armstrone returned Wednesday from Shawnigan Lake, B.C., where he had spent the winter. He is on his way to his mining property on Russel Creek. Last year water pipes and two monitors were put in, and now everything is ready for the start of washing as soon as the river freeze breaks. Already $100,000 has been spent on the property by a dozen Victoria investors.
  • May 14, 1926: The official opening of the tenis courts will take place at 2 p.m. on Saturday. May 15th. A mixed doubles tournament will be played off during the afternoon, suitable prizes being awarded to the winners.

  • May 21, 1926: A petition was received from James Wickersham asking for cooperation in building a road from Skagway to Yukon. The Council deemed the undertaking too expensive for the finances of the Territory.
  • May 21, 1926: Yukon Council aso received petitions requesting funding for other roads, including Carcross-Tagish, the scenic road to the Midnight Dome, a trail to Spotted Fawn Creek, Indian-Stewart, and others.
  • May 21, 1926: The Steamers Keno and Casca left the docks here on Monday, May 17th. This is probably the earliest date of sailing from Whitehorse of which there is any record. Navigation however would have been impossible had it not been for the body of water conserved by the Dam.

  • May 28, 1926: When the steamer Casca arrived in Whitehorse May 27 with a barge load of gasoline tanks, a record was made for the early landing of freight from down the river points. The earliest date in previous had been June 1st.
  • May 28, 1926: A. A. Bennett and Ed. Young arrived here by plane Wednesday evening, bringing films of Amundsen's flight to the north pole. Mr. Bennett left early Saturday afternoon on the return flight to Fairbanks, and Mr. Young left Saturday evening by train for the outside with the films. The machine was in need of some repairs and for this purpose the B. Y. N. shops were placed at the disposal of the aviators.
  • May 28, 1926: The annual celebration was a great success. The number of people arriving by the excursion train was even larger than that of last year, The weather man was on his good behavior. Immediately after lunch the programme of the afternoon opened with the motor vehicle parade. This new departure proved quite an attraction.

June

  • June 4, 1926: With this issue The Whitehorse Star enters its twenty-seventh year. Twenty-six years ago the paper was started by Dr. P. F. Scharschmidt. The following year it was taken over by Messrs Rousseau and McEachren, both of whom died in the harness, Mr. McEachren in 1906, and Mr. Rosseau in 1920.
  • June 4, 1926: Arriving from Dawson last week on her way outside for medical treatment, Mrs. Daniel A. Currie was taken from the boat to the Whitehorse General Hospital. Mrs. Currie gradually became weaker and shortly after 9 p.m. on Monday, May 31st, she passed away. Interment being made in the cemetery here. Read the entire article here.
  • June 4, 1926: The first tourists of the season to spend a few days in Whitehorse were Miss Gladys E. Parr and Miss Annette Standaert. Miss Parr is Secretary to the Dean of Women in the State Normal School at Bellingham, Washington, and Miss Standaert is in the Seattle office of the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway. They very much enjoyed their brief stay in Whitehorse but regretted that time would not permit of a visit to Dawson this year.

  • June 11, 1926: Miss King, Miss Garrow and Miss Sloan, of the Dawson school staff, leave Dawson Wednesday on the Whitehorse for the outside. The two latter have resigned. Miss McLean, another member of the staff, has also resigned and leaves Tuesday on the Steamer Yukon by the lower river for Honolulu and New Zealand.
  • June 11, 1926: F. S. Holz, now of Kuala Lumpur, and a resident of Dawson in the early days, arrived in town Wednesday afternoon and left the same evening on the Steamer Casca for a brief visit to Dawson. He is now on a world tour. Mr. Holz was at one time private secretary of the Yukon Gold Company. He is said to have a great fund of pioneer stories and a most attractive way of telling them.
  • June 11, 1926: Livingstone Wernecke, general superintendent of the Treadwell-Yukon Company Limited, paid a brief visit to Dawson on his way back to Mayo from the outside. While there he purchased two pianos and a bowling alley to be used in connection with the new club room and curling rink at the camp.

  • June 18, 1926: Miss Helen Bushell, who had been in the hospital here for several weeks suffering from an attack of influenza with complications, passed away on Sunday evening. The remains were taken to Carcross Tuesday for burial in the little cemetery. Read the entire article here.
  • June 18, 1926: Early in the spring of 1925 Whitehorse was favored with a visit from Mr. David Davis, ex-M.L.A. of Sydney, Australia, and his daughter, Miss F. B. Davis. They were so impressed that they have now returned. Mr. Davis has presented slide shows here and at Atlin, with proceeds going to to support the curling club and hospital respectively.
  • June 18, 1926: Large display ads are published each week promoting the new Klim powdered milk. The title of the one in this issue is "As good as taking a cow along!"

  • June 25, 1926: After an illness of several years, Mrs. Geo. W. Kitchen of Los Angeles passed away last week on the Steamer Casca on its way from Dawson to Whitehorse. Read this article and one from the Los Angeles Times here.
  • June 25, 1926: The trial of Harry Davis lasted only one day, Monday, June 21st. At about 10 p.m. the Jury brought in a verdict of manslaughter and he was immediately sentenced to life imprisonment. Davis admitted killing Charles Smith in his cabin near Selkirk on February 12th last, and of concealing the body in the cellar.
  • June 25, 1926: Fred Young is running a small display ad promoting his tours to Miles Canyon and Whitehorse Rapids. "Our large yellow car can accommodate twelve passengers."

July

  • July 2, 1926: On June 28th, Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King resigned, and adjourned the House. The next day, Arthur Meighen was sworn in as Canada's ninth Prime Minister.
  • July 2, 1926: In a lengthy editorial entitled "Making a Good Town Better." J. D. Skinner seems to indicate that there are businesses in town from which he has been unable to collect money owed the paper.
  • July 2, 1926: L. A Harrison, undertaker and embalmer at Skagway, gives special care to shipping cases.

  • July 9, 1926: Coming South on the last trip of the Steamer Whitehorse the passengers were delightfully entertained on Saturday evening with a lengthy and typically northern programme of music and theatre, beginning with a Grand March and ending with a dance.
  • July 9, 1926: On Monday evening last a large gathering of members of all denominations assembled in the I.0.D.E. rooms, appropriately decorated for the occasion, to extend a welcome to Rev. G. H. and Mrs. Findlay and their two daughters, Janey and Marguerite.
  • July 9, 1926: The passengers on the Steamer Casca who arrived in Whitehorse on Wednesday were treated to a rare sight as one herd of caribou after another were seen on the sand bars and on the mountain side and swimming the river. It was evidently all one herd broken up into numerous bands. The total number seen could not have been less than one thousand.

  • July 16, 1926: H. M. Hopewell, a retired banker of Texamah, Nebraska, wrote to The Star regarding his trip to Dawson, and the letter takes up half the front page.
  • July 16, 1926: The Misses Wheeler were the hostesses at a very enjoyable launch party on Saturday last. The party left on the launch "Loon" in the morning for Lake Lebarge. Upon arriving at Jack Fish Bay anchor was cast and a delicious and appetizing lunch was served. On the journey home a stop was made at Ice Cream Cove, where supper was served.
  • July 16, 1926: Another evidence of the growing popularity of the Yukon River trip was the capacity passenger list of the Steamer Casca leaving here on Wednesday evening. Some eighty of the passengers were going down the lower river.

  • July 23, 1926: The Secretary of the Dawson Liberal Association has received a telegram from F. T. Congdon expressing his willingness to accept the Liberal nomination for this constituency. The prospects for a Liberal victory, he says, are excellent as the feeling throughout the country is steadily swinging to the Liberal Party.
  • July 23, 1926: Press reports indicate that the Dominion Elections will be held in September. Although sweeping victories for both the old parties are already being broadcasted the time is not ripe for the making of anything approaching an approximate forecast. Many are of the opinion that the rank and file are not at all pleased at having the country saddled with the expense of an election at this time.
  • July 23, 1926: Vancouver business men seem to have little or no idea of the possibilities of Yukon. This lack of knowledge is a handicap to both places. Vancouver could do much to assist the development of Yukon, which would result in improved conditions in Yukon and a further increase in business for Vancouver.

  • July 30, 1926: Some forty members of the National Editorial Association of the United States paid Yukon a brief but happy visit on Sunday and Monday of this week. Engine trouble on the Steamer Tutshi badly disrupted their excursion to Ben My Chree, but reports have been very favorable nevertheless.
  • July 30, 1926: The Editor of The Whitehorse Star is decidedly of the Liberal persuasion. He will vote Liberal, and anything he may do personally will be in support of the Liberal candidate. In so far, however, as The Whitehorse Star is concerned both parties will be accorded the same treatment. Space for their campaign propaganda will be available to them upon the same conditions and the same rates.
  • July 30, 1926: Whitehorse has heen favored this week with a visit from one of the early residents of the town, R. D. Pineo, who is still spoken of as one of the enterprising and popular citizens of the old days. He is accompanied by Mrs. Pinneo and their youngest daughter Jeannette. Their daughter Katherine, born here in 1901, is said to be the second white child born in Whitehorse.

August

  • August 6, 1926: Edgar B. Tolman, Jr., and his wife, from Chicago, are in Whitehorse. They left their palatial steamer at Ketchikan and continued to Skagway in a 19-foot Merrimac canoe with a 4½-horsepower motor. They were brought to Whitehorse on the White Pass Railway and are now ready to continue to Dawson with the canoe.
  • August 6, 1926: Some forty members of the National Editorial Association of the United States were in town last Sunday. Among them was Richard C. Anzer of Union City, New Jersey, who was last in this country in 1899 when he worked on the Bennett Sun at Bennett.
  • August 6, 1926: Robbie's Parlor gives special attention to the wants of tourists in breakfasts, lunches, teas. Always ready. Kleanliness, Kwality, Kwickness.

  • August 13, 1926: The lively times of the '98 Dance Hall were lived over again in the North Star Hall on Wednesday evening. Quite a number of the old-timers were on deck. Some of them were in charge of the gambling tables; some of them were attending to the urgent wants of the customers at the brilliantly lighted and well stocked bar, and others spent the greater part of the evening tripping the light fantastic.
  • August 13, 1926: A display ad on the front page promotes midnight trips to the Llewellyn Glacier, with the launch Atlinto leaving the Atlin Inn dock at 10 p.m.
  • August 13, 1926: The Skagway Harvest Fair will be held this year on August 23rd and 24th. On the evening of the second day an entertainment will be given in connection with the Fair, consisting of playlets, music and readings.

  • August 20, 1926: A large shipment of cattle and hogs were unloaded here last week for the rapidly growing business of P. Burns & Company.
  • August 20, 1926: Word reached here by wire that the body of Frank Mutch, who was drowned in the Stewart River at Mayo on July 30th, was recovered on August 14th.
  • August 20, 1926: Alex J. Stringer came in from Champagne this week bringing with him a number of children for St. Paul's Hostel at Dawson. They left for Dawson Sunday evening on the Steamer Whitehorse.

  • August 27, 1926: The Star continues with lengthy political statements, particularly from the Liberal Committee. On the front page today, "A careful survey of the nonpartisan press indicates the return of the Liberal party. The decided swing of the pendulum in Yukon to F. T. Congdon, the Liberal candidate, is apparent to everyone."
  • August 27, 1926: W. M.. Archibald, Superintendent at Trail, B. C., of the Consolidated Mining amd Smelting Company, arrived here Wednesday from a trip of inspection to the Keno and Beaver districts. That the Consolidated people are keenly interested in that part of the country has been apparent for some time, but the intentions of the company have been and are very carefully guarded.
  • August 27, 1926: A display ad for H. G. Macpherson Pharmacy says: "All the new text books required for school use. Wonderful values in Exercise Books and Scribblers. Splendid assortment of Pens, Pencils, Erasers, Crayons, Rulers and Paints. Free Blotters."

September

  • September 3, 1926: Half the front page and 1/4 of the back (4th) page is taken up by a statement by the Liberal Committee regarding the current federal election campaign. There is no news except election campaign pieces.

  • September 10, 1926: This issue is also entirely election campaign reports and statements, with no other news.

  • September 17, 1926: Conservative candidate George Black won the election for Yukon M.P., defeating Liberal Frederick Tennyson Congdon, 823 to 648. Across Canada, W. L. Mackenzie King's Liberals won a solid majority. Conservative leader Arthur Meighen's position as Prime Minister lasted only 3 months.
  • September 17, 1926: The Northern Fox Ranch Company has instructed T. A. Firth to sell its entire holdings in West Dawson, comprising ten (10) acres of land, cabin, stable, meat tunnel, fifty four (54) fox pens enclosed in corral 800x240 feet, complete with guard fence; and fourteen (14) pairs of silver black breeders. Everything must be sold. No reservations.
  • September 17, 1926: Copied from the Northwest Mining Service, of Spokane: The Yukon-Pueblo mine of the Richmond Consolidated Mining Company is to be opened forthwith by means of a new shaft, located so as to permit of large scale production at the earliest possible date both from the new shoot of high grade ore and from the large ore body developed to a depth of 500 feet by the old main shaft.

  • September 24, 1926: Work on the Whitehorse Copper properties is to be resumed under the management of the Richmond Consolidated Mining Company, as the result of satisfying diamond drilling operations.
  • September 24, 1926: The demand for space by the two political parties during the few weeks immediately preceding the election left us without space or time to take care of local or other news. The best that could be done was done and in so far as The Whitehorse Star was concerned precisely the same treatment was accorded all political parties.
  • September 24, 1926: "A. D. Foster, Jr., of Baltimore, and D. C. Sharp, of Houston, Texas, arrived back in town this week from a successful big game hunt. While out they secured some splendid moving pictures of game." Three other big game hunts were also reported on.

October

  • October 1, 1926: The Russell Creek Hydraulic Gold Mines Limited, whose scene of operitions is about two handred miles from Fort Selkirk, has received very gratifying reports from the superintendent in charge of operations on the ground, Major Nevill A. D. Armstrong, who has had a gang since early May washing and preparing for the cleanup this fall.
  • October 1, 1926: The people of Carcross received a terrible shock Saturday morning upon the discovery being made that sometime during the night "Ike" Gillespie had taken his own life. He was dressed in his underwear, and apparently was sitting on the side of the bed when the fatal act was committed. The body was lying across the bed and the left hand still held the rifle. Mr. Gillespie had been ailing for some time, and at times is said to have endured much suffering.
  • October 1, 1926: Dr. W. E. Cockfield, of the Geological Survey Branch at Ottawa, returned to town with his party on Saturday last. Dr. Cockfield had been working this season at Aishihik Lake, Sekulmuan Lake, Hutshi Lakes and surrounding country.

  • October 8, 1926: On September 25th, 27-year-old Miss Mary Walker Scoular became the bride of Mr. James Bonner in Vancouver. Shortly after the ceremony, she was killed when their honeymoon car overturned at the entrance to Stanley Park. Miss Scoular was born in Scotland and came to Victoria with her parents fourteen years ago. In the summer of 1923 she was a member of the dining room staff at the Atlin Inn, and in the summer of 1924 she had charge of the dining rooms of the City Cafe in Whitehorse.
  • October 8, 1926: A display ad on the front page announces that dentists Dr. Franks and Dr. Snider expect to be in Whitehorse about October lth, and will remain here sufficiently long to care for those requiring dental work.
  • October 8, 1926: With the exception of the Steamer Dawson, which will leave Dawson next week on its last upstream trip of the season, all the White Pass boats are tied up. The Steamer Whitehorse is already on the ways.

  • October 15, 1926: The Steamer Dawson ran on the rocks at Rink Rapids at 9.30 Wednesday morning and sank. Its hull was punctured in several places and as it settled on the river bottom it appeared to break in two, so that the vessel may become a total loss. There were about seventy-five passengers aboard including a number of women and children.
  • October 15, 1926: It has been many years since Whitehorse has witnessed anything like the improvements made to residential properties this year. The aggregate spent this year on homes in Whitehorse would run into thousands of dollars. In several of them plumbing has been installed.
  • October 15, 1926: Quite a number of people came over from Carcross and Atlin on Saturday last to take in the play at the N. S. A. A. Hall that evening and spend the week end here.

  • October 22, 1926: Yesterday the Regina Hotel was purchased by Ole Erickson. The Regina is one of the original landmarks of the town. It was erected in 1900 by C. H. Johnston, who has been in charge continuously up to the present.
  • October 22, 1926: The Steamer Thistle returned this week from a strenuous trip to the Teslin Lake post of Messrs Taylor & Drury. Never before was the water recorded as being so low at this season of the year. Difficulties were encountered in both the going and return trips.
  • October 22, 1926: The remains of the late Mrs. Joe Beauchamp, who passed away at Bear Creek last spring, and where temporary interment was made, were brought to town and laid to rest in the cemetery here on Tuesday. Mass was said by Rev. Father Deane, of Skagway.

  • October 29, 1926: A lengthy article on the front page describes the Toronto wedding of Miss Rowena Victoria, daughter of Bishop of Yukon and Mrs. I. O. Stringer, to Rev. C. R. Heber Wilkinson, B.A.
  • October 29, 1926: Captain P. Martin has made a valuable contribution to the improvement in the appearance of the town. For vears the appearance of the street has been marred by the unsightly and useless building just west of The Star office. Captain Martin has now had W. H. Simpson move the building 20 feet and completely rebuild it.
  • October 29, 1926: Clyde White, mining engineer, who is in charge of the Silversmith Mine at Sandon, B. C., is here in connection with the re-opening of the Richmond Consolidated copper holdings in the Whitehorse district. The machinery which arrived a short time ago is being installed as rapidly as possible.

November

  • November 5, 1926: Fred Vey arrived home from Atlin on Saturday evening and immediately entered the service of Greenfield & Pickering for the winter months.
  • November 5, 1926: The School Report for October lists all 64 students and their test scores, led by Grant Machpherson, Grade VI, with 92.
  • November 5, 1926: Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Richards and Mr. and Mrs. George Howitt motored to Carmacks this week.

  • November 12, 1926: Just as we go to press word has reached town that a rich body of ore has been struck on the Carlisle property of the Richmond Consolidated Mining Company here. Mining operations under the experienced direction of T. Kerruish have been under way but a short time.
  • November 12, 1926: Sgt. Joy and Corp. Cronkhite are away investigating the death of John Thorn, late of Thistle Creek. He was found dead on the shore ice of the Stewart River some fifteen miles above Stewart City. To all appearances it was an accident, the supposition being that he slipped, causing the discharge of the rifle.
  • November 12, 1926: Dr. Rae L. Carlson, optometrist, of Ketchikan, paid Whitehorse a professional visit this week and is very well satisfied with the results of this her first visit. Hereafter she plans to visit Whitehorse once a year.

  • November 19, 1926: The ice in front of Dawson stopped running Sunday morning. This is exceptionally early considering the mild weather.
  • November 19, 1926: Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Newmarch and their son Charlie left Tuesday morning for the outside. Mr. Newmarch took charge of the Whitehorse branch of the Canadian Bank of Commerce in 1915, giving him a record of eleven years as manager of one branch. This is probably one of the longest periods of service in connection with the smaller branches of the bank.
  • November 19, 1926: Sgt. Joy and Corp. Cronkhite returned to Dawson from Thistle Creek bringing the body of J. Thorn. To all appearances this was a case of suicide. Thorn had stood on the edge of the shore ice evidently with the idea that after the shooting his body would fall backward into the river. The first shot grazed the temple and the blank cartridge was found by the body. The second shot did the deed and the body fell forward. Ill health was no doubt the cause.

  • November 26, 1926: At a meeting of the Ladies' Curling Club on Saturday last officers were elected. The first games in the opening bonspiel will be played December 1st. The Hudson Bay tournament will follow.
  • November 26, 1926: Approximately two months without reading matter in Dawson, the public are disgusted. Want less express but more mail. It is mail service public pay for. New contract required. Carry all the mail all the time. If present contractors would carry less express and more reading matter they would create a better feeling than what now exists.
  • November 26, 1926: A lengthy editorial explaining the mail problem stated above says that after 2500 pounds of mail left for northern points last week (the amount called for in the contract), there was still 7,330 pounds in the Whitehorse post office, including many newspapers.

December

  • December 3, 1926: A petition was filed in Dawson last Thursday protesting the election of George Black, which case will come up next summer and be tried before two judges. There are twenty some odd charges in the petition.
  • December 3, 1926: At a well attended meeting held last week the Whitehorse Skating Club organized for the season. Yorke Wilson is the new president, and Allan Gordon the secretary-treasurer. Selection of the rink site was left to the ice committee.
  • December 3, 1926: Toronto papers report a splendid address recently delivered in that city by F. T. Congdon, in which he optimistically referred to the statements of men qualified to know, who claim that in the Dawson field alone there was gold to the value of $200,000,000. Attention was also called to the wonderful possibilities of the Mayo field.

  • December 10, 1926: Last Friday night a young man named Frank Hull, who was brought in to Dawson during the day from Bear Creek, passed away in the hospital. The symptoms were similar to those in the epidemic of bowel complaint on Hunker Creek ten years ago. There are several such cases at Bear Creek at present.
  • December 10, 1926: The silver strike at deWolfe is creating considerable interest at Dawson. Dog teams are leaving for there every few days and very encouraging reports are being received. Old-timers are very optimistic regarding the future of this section.
  • December 10, 1926: Rev. W. H. L. West returned Monday from Carcross. He speaks highly of the conduct of the staff and pupils of the school in connection with the fire which occurred on Wednesday evening, December 1st. Spontaneous combustion is thought to be the cause of the fire.

  • December 17, 1926: During his short stay in Whitehorse Mr. John B. Blick was a busy man. The real purpose of his visit was to meet his wife-to-be, Mrs. Belle McNeal Daley. Mr. Blick is the general manager of the Dease Creek Mines Corporation, which has just completed the installation of an hydraulic plant with a capacity of 2000 yards a day on the company's property, and this will be ready for operation immediately the pipe line is put down in the spring.
  • December 17, 1926: The Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corporation of Hollywood are arranging to film the trail of '98, depicting the stupendous stampede to the Klondike. The present plans are to have work under way this coming summer. Miles Canyon, Whitehorse Rapids and Whitehorse are sure to be featured strongly in the picture. During the period in which the pictures are being taken it will mean much to Whitehorse, and the benefits to be derived from a publicity standpoint will be a great boon to this popular tourist route.
  • December 17, 1926: Sealed tenders will be received up to noon on Monday, December 27th, for supplying the Whitehorse General Hospital with eighty (80) cords of four (4) foot wood and fifteen (15) cords of sixteen (16) foot Kitchen wood. Wood to be standing dry or stripped seasoned.

  • December 24, 1926: Taylor & Drury advertise that they have the "Finest display ever made in Whitehorse - Equal to any of the large city stores in Canada. Personally selected and gathered together in the Yukon, so far away from the rush and roar of city life."
  • December 24, 1926: In this season's curling competitions, thirteen rinks have been entered. The first games will be played Monday evening.
  • December 24, 1926: The Skagway hockey team is arranging to visit Whitehorse on Tuesday, December 28th. A dance is being arranged for the evening of the 30th.

  • December 31, 1926: News from Dawson is that stampeders continue to stake at DeWolfville, a number going during the holidays.
  • December 31, 1926: Hector Beaulac left this morning to take the baths at Tenakee Hot Springs. Later he may go into the Mackenzie River country.
  • December 31, 1926: Word has been received from J. E. Pickering that "Commodore" Bruce narrowly escaped what might have been a serious accident while hauling wood at Braeburn. He was hauling logs with one horse from the woods nearby to the roadhouse, when the animal got beyond his control and ran away. The log struck Mr. Bruce, throwing him some twenty feet into a snowdrift, but fortunately he did not sustain the slightest injury.

1927

January

  • January 7, 1927: Pioneer Kluane miner and big game guide William "Billie" Armstrong died in the Whitehorse hospital this morning at the age of about 58.
  • January 7, 1927: Arthur Nordham and mine manager Tom Kerruish very nearly lost their lives to asphyxiation at the Carlisle mine on Saturday evening when they went underground too soon after a blast.
  • January 7, 1927: Ed. "Rastus" Foreman died recently in Seattle. He came to Skagway in 1897, and with Mr. Dedman started the Golden North Hotel.

  • January 14, 1927: Jackie McIntosh Indian) charged with the murder of Pelly Jim (Indian), was tried here on Saturday last before His Honor Mr. Justice Macaulay and a Jury. After a deliberation of forty-five minutes, the jury returned a verdict of manslaughter with a very strong recommendation for mercy. A sentence of three years in the Whitehorse penitentiary was imposed.
  • January 14, 1927: The Police have been doing splendid work in rounding up offenders with respect to the selling of liquor to Indians.
  • January 14, 1927: The Dawson News says that more tourists visited Dawson in 1926 than in 1925. A reasonable amount of sensible publicity would greatly increase the river traffic. Action is absolutely necessary. The business will not be built up without effort. In this connection it would appear that procrastination is a very serious handicap to Yukon. The matter of making a start is simply put off from year to year.

  • January 21, 1927: Mr. and Mrs, Gene Jacquot and baby arrived in town this week from Kluane Lake. They made the trip by dog team and spent ten days in actual travel. Even the baby seemed to enjoy the forty below weather.
  • January 21, 1927: Mrs. A. L. Grant, at one time in the employ of the White Pass Mail Service, passed away in Skagway this week. Mrs. Grant came to Skagway in the early days. At one time she ran the roadhouse at Little River. In later years she has been employed as cook on the White Pass Railway.
  • January 21, 1927: Miss Margaret Cameron, of the Chooutla School, Carcross, came over on Tuesday afternoon in charge of Ida Dawson, one of the pupils, who entered the hospital here for treatment.

  • January 28, 1927: Charles Evangelista, Sixty Mile miner, was arraigned in Dawson court for suspected insanity and was released.
  • January 28, 1927: Const. Peter Smith left Tuesday with Jackie McIntosh, who was transferred to the penitentiary at New Westminster to serve his term in connection with the death of Pelly Jim.
  • January 28, 1927: Advice came by wire Wednesday that a son had been born to Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Watson at the Vancouver General Hospital that morning. This will be another sturdy Canadian for Carcross.

February

  • February 4, 1927: In the Culbertson Shield Curling Competition the rink skipped By W. L. Phelps came through without a loss, capturing the Culbertson Shield and the first prize of four smoking sets.
  • February 4, 1927: The school report is published, with each of the 46 students' grades for December. Grant Macpherson in Grade VI and Violet Somerton in Grade V were the top students with 93 per cent.
  • February 4, 1927: The many friends of Mr. Ole Erickson will be pleased to hear that after undergoing a careful examination by a specialist in Vancouver, his ailment was found to be not at all serious. Affected teeth was found to be the cause and these will be attended to before he leaves for home.

  • February 11, 1927: The latest report from the silver camp at DeWolfe in the Dawson area is that Peter Rost is now working on the vein piling up ore for shipment in the spring.
  • February 11, 1927: In an interview with Stroller White at Juneau while on his way to the outside, Joe Beauchamp, the veteran trader at Bear Creek, gave some slight intimation of the possibility of his returning with a bride.
  • February 11, 1927: Dan McKenzie, of Mayo, passed through town this week on his way to the Portland Canal district.

  • February 18, 1927: On Monday of this week the editor of The Whitehorse Star had his first ride by doo team. The only thing to mar the pleasure of the ride was the feeling of sadness, which could not be brushed aside, for the many thousands on the great outside, who have to content themselves with riding in autos.
  • February 18, 1927: One of the most enjoyable Masquerades ever held in Whitehorse was the St. Valentine Masquerade, given by Yukon Chapter, Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire, in the N. S. A. A. Hall on Monday evening. Seventy-two costumes, both rich and comical, graced the floor.
  • February 18, 1927: Robert Bowers left by stage on Wednesday morning to take charge of the roadhouse at Little River.

  • February 25, 1927: The Trail Rangers skating test and races on Saturday afternoon was a very enjoyable affair. The requirements of the test are by no means easy for out of the fifteen boys who made the try Bud Cyr was the only one successful.
  • February 25, 1927: The tonnage of individual operators in the Mayo silver camp will not be so heavy this year, due partly to the drop in the price of silver. The Treadwell-Yukon Company are running at full capacity and their output will be heavy. Conditions generally in the camp are in a very flourishing condition.
  • February 25, 1927: P. Burns & Co. has a week-end special on Buffalo Meat, killed at Wainwright, Alberta, under Government inspection.

March

  • March 4, 1927: A dastardly attack on Michael Essanau was made by T. Drugan in Dawson on the morning of March 1st. Drugan demanded money from the old man, and on being refused, he beat him up very badly, attacking him with a bottle, and if help had not been forthcoming a much more serious charge might have been laid against the offender.
  • March 4, 1927: Seven Peel River Indians arrived in Dawson last Saturday, coming all the way from McPherson. They left today on the return trip.
  • March 4, 1927: Captain and Mrs. C. M. Coghlan. arrived home Saturday evening from Braeburn, where they had been in charge of the roadhouse during the winter. George Robinson is relieving at Braeburn.

  • March 11, 1927: Thursday's train brought the shipyard crew and many others who had been spending the winter outside. Many Skagway people came over for the bonspiel, hockey and carnival.
  • March 11, 1927: The Princess Ena is scheduled to leave Vancouver on or about April 15th and May 10th, carrying gasoline and explosives. Orders are being placed early in view of the heavy passenger traffic anticipated this season.
  • March 11, 1927: Rey. W. A. Tinney, of St. Peter's Indian Mission at Dynevor, Manitoba, has been appointed principal of the Chooutla Residential School at Carcross, where he arrived yesterday to take over his new duties.

  • March 18, 1927: Quite a number of people came over from Skagway on Thursday last to witness the hockey games and take part in the closing festivities of the skating and curling season. The carnival on Saturday evening was by far the best ever witnessed in Whitenorse.
  • March 18, 1927: Alex Berry, mining engineer, was in Dawson from Mayo, and visited the silver camp at DeWolfville.
  • March 18, 1927: With this issue The Whitehorse Star enters its fourth year under the present management. During the past three years the paper has been treated very kindly. The generous support of the friends of the paper is very much appreciated.

  • March 25, 1927: Dawson should have a busy season this year if all the present plans mature, F. M. Fenton, old time Yukon Gold foreman, will be here to open up the Yukon Gold ditch, and the hydraulics, two of the electric shovels with elevators are to be installed at the mouth of Sulphur on Dominion Creek. The dredge number four is to be raised, and all other dredges that operated last season will continue this season.
  • March 25, 1927: An old timer from Chicken Creek, J. E. Fitzpatrick, was found suffering from a paralytic stroke. Being unable to light his fire he had both hands and feet frozen. He died en route between here and Fortymile.
  • March 25, 1927: The conduct of the Skagway girls and boys who recently visited Whitehorse was very much appreciated and admired. They were a credit to themselves, their parents, their teachers and their town. The manner in which the visiting boys applauded and treated the home boys on the ice was a pleasing example of manliness and sportsmanship. A fitting compliment to the conduct of the boys was the grace and charm of the girls.

April

  • April 1, 1927: Beautifully situated at the gateway to the famous Atlin district. the Caribou Hotel is the best and the most favorably known hotel in the North. You would very much enjoy a day's fishing at Carcross. Beautiful launch trips and good bathing places. Mrs. E. W. Gideon, Proprietor.
  • April 1, 1927: W. G. Chantler came in from his ranch Saturday to do several jobs of carpentering for which he contracted last year. Considerable alteration and repair work has already been planned for this year. Local contractors are all busy and are looking forward to a busy season.
  • April 1, 1927: H. Chambers arrived in town on Saturday from his trading post at Champage, bringing with him a fine shipment of fur. He says that the catch is lighter than last year but that the quality is exceptionally good.

  • April 8, 1927: A preliminary meeting has been held with a view to organizing a local branch of the Canadian Legion of the British Empire Serviee League. This organization is composed of ex-service men. Twenty members are required to form a branch and when this number is secured a charter will be applied for.
  • April 8, 1927: The parent and child service comprising all the denominations of the town was held on Sunday evening in St. Andrew's Church, and was the most largely attended gathering of its kind in Whitehorse for a long time. Members of all four Church Schools took part in the service.
  • April 8, 1927: A lengthy editorial discusses the need for both Whitehorse and Dawson to work on developing tourism, despite the current bright outlook for mining.

  • April 15, 1927: There was a large and jolly gathering of lads and dads at the Father and Son banquet in the I. O. D. E. Rooms on Friday evening last. The lads had been looking forward to a bang up good time and their fondest dreams were more than realized.
  • April 15, 1927: T. C. Richards, Yukon manager for P. Burns & Company Limited, returned last week from an overland trip made by the firm's caterpillar tractor to Mayo. While there Mr. Richards visited Keno and the Wernecke Camp. The prospects are bright for an active season in that area.
  • April 15, 1927: Adam Birnie has returned to the Dam after a short vacation spent outside.

  • April 22, 1927: Until very recently the coyote was not to be found in this section of the country. A few years ago he made his first appearance and the numbers have heen increasing yearly. The reduction in the fur harvest is already quite marked, and it is everywhere conceded that the coyote is responsible.
  • April 22, 1927: Roy E. Gault has purchased the business owned by L. A. Harrison in Skagway, and will operate it as the Roy E. Gault Merchantile Co. The business was founded in 1898 and has always carried a complete line of merchandise. Walter Troberg formerly of Dawson, will be manager.
  • April 22, 1927: Capt. R. P. Roberts, Engineers H. J. Hutchinson, and H. Grace of the Steamer Thistle, Taylor and Drury Ltd., arrived to take up their duties for the summer.

  • April 29, 1927: Following the close of the curling season the curling rink was thrown open for the use of skaters. The comfort of skating indoors was very much appreciated, and it has been the means of reviving stronger than ever the agitation for a covered rink.
  • April 29, 1927: The report of the Library Committee was published. There are 51 members, and 1,438 circulated during the year. Mrs. MacLaren was librarian for part of the year and received $250. She arranged a new card system of cataloguing the books.
  • April 29, 1927: The river opened here on the morning of April 27th. H. M. McBurnie, L. McNutt, F. G. Wilson, Geo. Corkle and Joe Treml went to Carcross Tuesday to work on the Tutshi.

May

  • May 6, 1927: H. Schenck, representing the Metro-Goldwyn-Meyer Picture Corporation, accompanied by Mrs. Schenck and their daughter June, is here in connection with the filming of the Trail of '98.
  • May 6, 1927: The Yukon Airways and Exploration Company Limited was incorporated yesterday. The company is based at Whitehorse and serves all parts of the Yukon. J. F. Finnegan is president, Clyde G. Wann vice-president, A. D. Cruikshank general manager, and C. A. K. Innes-Taylor advisory director.
  • May 6, 1927: L. B. Jones, agent at Skagway for the Canadian National Railways and Steamships, says the company is doing some splendid publicity work for Yukon and Alaska. The Canadian National boats have become very popular with the tourists. The reservations for the northern trip this season are the heaviest yet.

  • May 13, 1927: Joe Fortier is applying his magic touch to the garden plot of The Canadian Bank of Commerce and this corner gives promise of becoming a beauty spot, competing for first place with the United Church property on the opposite side of the street. With a little more attention this particular part of the town will be something to which citizens may point with pride.
  • May 13, 1927: W. A. Puckett has a large display ad on the front page with a graphic of a new Ford car.
  • May 13, 1927: The Yukon Airways and Exploration Company Limited, and the Ryan Brougham aircraft they are having built, are described - read the article here.

  • May 20, 1927: A. Halkett, government engineer, returned by stage Monday from Rink Rapids, where he had been making a survey with a view to the removal of the reef where the Steamer Dawson hit last fall, and other reefs. J. P. Forde, district government engineer, is expected to arrive here Monday, and he and Mr. Halkett will make a further inspection of the river.
  • May 20, 1927: The ice went out at Dawson at 11.23 on Friday night, May 13th. This is ten days later than last year when the ice moved at 10.48 am. on May 3rd. This year a pool of $300 was made at Whitehorse. It was won by George Ryder. Jack Heath won $300 on the Dawson pool. In Fairbanks the ice pool was something over $30,000.
  • May 20, 1927: Joe Williams, official photographer for The Whitehorse Star, visited the Carlisle mining camp on Tuesday evening with a view to getting some pictures of the camp.

  • May 27, 1927: Arrangements are made for the introduction of General Motors' lines into the Yukon. Taylor and Drury Ltd. will be the representatives for Southern Yukon and the Mayo-Keno district.
  • May 27, 1927: The first boat of the season to leave Whitehorse was the Steamer Casca, which left for Dawson Wednesday with a good passenger list and freight cargo. This is only six days behind the first sailing of last season, and is exceptionally early considering the late spring.
  • May 27, 1927: The Greentield & Pickering Royal Mail Stage arrived in town from the north Thursday afternoon from the last trip of the season. Conditions on the overland trail this winter have been the most unfavorable in years, but notwithstanding this trying handicap a very efficient and regular service was maintained.

June

  • June 10, 1927: The American consular agency at Whitehorse, W. D. MacBride consular agent, was closed at the end of May. Consular business arising here will hereafter be taken care of at Prince Rupert. The consular agency at Whitehorse was established in 1910 with G. B. Edwards as agent.
  • June 10, 1927: Ernie Johnson was in from Robinson this week. He reports good progress on the road construction to the Mascot mine. The tractor had already made a through trip and from now on the road will continue to improve.
  • June 10, 1927: The first issue of the Skagway Alaskan appeared on June 1st. The new paper comes out as a semi-weekly. Miss Cathryn L. Hahn is the editor.

  • June 17, 1927: The majority of this 6-page issue consists of articles about the Whitehorse Copper Belt, in particular the Pueblo and Tamarack-Carlisle properties.
  • June 17, 1927: The New Northwest Company is very busy operating all dredges. Are operating three drills day and night drilling holes for thawing on the Klondyke. Mr. Fenton, hydraulic superintendent, has just returned from a trip over the big ditch and reports it wiil be repaired this week, with the big hydraulics started in another week.
  • June 17, 1927: A Yukon air service is soon to be established. The Yukon Airways and Exploration Company was incorporated only a few weeks ago. An order was immediately placed for a Ryan Brougham with the idea of inaugurating a service as quickly as possible.

  • June 24, 1927: A heayy shipment of mining machinery arrived this week for the Richmond-Yukon Copper Limited, the main equipment consisting of a Diesel engine, a four-drill compressor and drill sharpener. This will be moved to the Tamarac-Carlisle property and installed as quickly as possible.
  • June 24, 1927: At the noon hour on Saturday last the town received a shock when it became known that nine-year-old Albert Somerton had been drowned while bathing in Ear Lake sometime during the forenoon. With his two younger brothers, Leslie and Freddie, and Bertie and Bobbie Vey, also about six and four years of age, Albert had gone to the lake about eight o'clock in the morning, and without revealing their plans to anyone.
  • June 24, 1927: The Chamber of Commerce of Long Beach, California, brought a group to the Yukon last summer, and so well was it received that another group of thirty people arrived on Saturday.

July

  • July 1, 1927: Wolf Creek has been the main obstacle to the opening up of a road to Carcross. Foreman Robert Jones believes that a solution has been found to the difficulty so long existing there. Work is already under way on a small detour from the old road where a small bridge will be constructed over a canyon on the creek, placing the structure above the ravages of the high water.
  • July 1, 1927: Since the arrival of Mr. Treadgold at Dawson things have been humming and there is every indication of a very busy season. The large electric shovels and a washing plant are being moved to Quartz Creek, and the electric force are busily engaged erecting a power line from Granville, over which the power will be transmitted for the operation of the plant.
  • July 1, 1927: Members of the Masonic fraternity and their families had a most enjoyable launch picnic on Friday last. The launch Loon and a barge conveyed the party to Ice Cream Cove where the greater part of the day was pleasantly spent.

  • July 15, 1927: Rev, G. H. Daimpre and Mrs. Daimpre arrived last week from Prince Rupert to make their home in Whitehorse. Mr. Daimpre is the new rector of Christ Church, replacing Rev. W. H. L. West, who was here for three years.
  • July 15, 1927: The "On To Alaska With Buchanan" party arrived here Sunday evening and left Tuesday morning for Atlin. In the party this year were forty-one boys and ten adults. Mr. George A. Buchanan was again personally in charge of the party. He is a great booster for the north country and his organized parties have been the means of giving it some splendid publicity.
  • July 15, 1927: On Saturday night the people of Whitehorse will have the opportunity of seeing Charlie Chaplin's best picture, "The Gold Rush." Nine reels of real comedy. This picture was brought here at a big expense but it promises to be a special treat for young and old.

  • July 22, 1927: George Lancaster, Eyes of the World Paramount News photographer, filmed yesterday from the moving Steamer Whitehorse between Isaac Creek and Selwyn, herds of caribou estimated at sixty thousands.
  • July 22, 1927: Mr. J. R. Foster says that the Mascot Mining Company is making very satisfactory progress. Three tons of ore left Robinson Wednesday for the American Smelting and Refining Company at Tacoma, and one ton for the Mace Manufacturing Company at Denver. The latter are manufacturing a small smelter for individual miners, and will make a special test of ore from the Mascot mine.
  • July 22, 1927: Rey. G. H. and Mrs. Findlay returned Monday afternoon from Carcross, Where Mrs. Findlay had been supervising the Canadian Girls In Training Camp for two weeks.

  • July 29, 1927: Sensational disclosures by diamond drill of large bodies of good grade milling ore during the past six weeks on the Pueblo property of Richmond-Yukon Copper Limited, again serves to emphasize the fact that all the Whitehorse mineral belt requires is a little intelligent expenditure of capital to bring it to the front. li> July 29, 1927: Most of this 6-page issue consists of articles about various aspects of the Whitehorse Copper Belt, with several photos. li> July 29, 1927: Miss Doris Skinner, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Skinner, was advised by wire Tuesday that she had been successful in her junior matriculation examination.

August

  • August 5, 1927: The exemption from the payment of royalty on the content of silver-lead ores shipped from the Yukon Territory is extended for one year.
  • August 5, 1927: Sir Hugh Denison, Australian trade commissioner to the United States, in addressing the Canadian Club in Vancouver on August 2nd, strongly urged that an arrangement should be entered into with the United States for the internationalization of Skagway and vicinity, or for a lease to Canada of a strip of the coast in order that Yukon and northern B.C. might enjoy port advantages to tidewater.
  • August 5, 1927: George P. Mackenzie is in charge of the Arctic Expedition again this year. Members of the party sailed for the far north on the SS Beothic on July 16th. Dr. F. Herschel Stringer, eldest son of Bishop and Mrs. I. 0. Stringer, and born on Herschel Island, is the ship's doctor.

  • August 12, 1927: The two previous seasons the annoyance and worry of mosquitoes had been greatly minimized by the use of oil in the spring. There was nothing done this spring and the mosquito was here in full strength.
  • August 12, 1927: An opportunity was given those wishing to make the trip to go on the Steamer Thistle leaving here Monday. Messrs Taylor & Drury gave excursion rates for the trip, and immediately this became known, more than could be accommodated signified their wish to take this popular outing.
  • August 12, 1927: For this season of the year passenger travel on the river was exceptionally good this week. Both boats had heavy passenger lists both ways. The Steamer Whitehorse left Sunday evening and the Casca, with an exceptionally heavy passenger list, left Wednesday evening, with nearly all going down the lower river and out that way.

  • August 19, 1927: Captain P. Martin gave the town a real surprise when he announced early in the week that he had disposed of his Arctic Trading Company store, warehouse and stock of merchandise to the Northern Commercial Company.
  • August 19, 1927: Many prominent mining men have visited Whitehorse during the past few months but this week we were honored with a woman who was very anxious to see for herself some of the properties in the Whitehorse copper belt. Mrs. Nellie S. Hayes, of Wallace, Idaho, and widow of the late John J. Hayes, who was widely known in mining activities, arrived here on the Steamer Casca Tuesday morning.
  • August 19, 1927: Charles C. Watson came over from Carcross Tuesday to spend a short time with Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Watson before returning to Vancouver, where he is now vice-principal of Magee school, the second largest school in Point Grey. Mr. Watson was the first white boy born on the present townsite of Whitehorse, and he received his early education in the school here.

  • August 26, 1927: From a Letter to the Editor: "Quite recently a picnic party of local people, including some young folks and some of maturer years, left the Robert Service Camp pavilion and kitchen in a sorry condition. Pop corn and food scraps were found all over the floor and dirty water in some of the kitchen equipment. The buildings remained in this condition until a party of tourists, after taking their lunch at the camp, cleaned everything up spick and span."
  • August 26, 1927: Senator Forest J. Hunt of Ketchikan has now added his voice to those supporting the granting of control over Skagway in some form to Canada.
  • August 26, 1927: C. A. K. Innes-Taylor wishes to announce that he is no longer in any capacity connected with the Yukon Airways and Exploration Company Limited.

September

  • September 2, 1927: A report received late on August 30th said that the C. P. R. Steamer Princess Charlotte was ashore at Violinski Rocks in Wrangell Narrows. The coast guard cutter Explorer responded to the SOS call message by Captain Troup. There were about 250 passengers on board and all were reported safe. The Charlotte was southbound from Skagway to Vancouver.
  • September 2, 1927: Last week the Richmond-Yukon Copper Limited moved their diamond drill from the Pueblo to the War Eagle, a distance of about six miles, in one day. The caterpillar tractor of P. Burns & Company Limited, the horse force of Tony Cyr, and the Ford truck of W. G. Chantler did the moving.
  • September 2, 1927: John Haydon came in last week from Kluane, bringing with him his son John, who left for Dawson to continue his studies in the Dawson school. Dorothy and Elsie Baker went to Dawson for the same purpose. They all make their home at St. Paul's Hostel while in Dawson.

  • September 9, 1927: Yukon Airways and Exploration Company Limited now finds that pontoons for the Queen of the Yukon may not be available this year, and Messrs. Cruikshank and Wann will likely arrive here any day with the machine.
  • September 9, 1927: Again this vear a great deal of work has been done in renewing foundations and making other improvements to government, church and private buildings in the town. Impetus has been given this class of work during the past two seasons because of the general improvement in conditions throughout Yukon.
  • September 9, 1927: Latest mining quotations available here give Richmond-Yukon Copper at 16 cents bid, 20 asked. This is about half the price prevailing a few weeks ago. However the people of Whitehorse are not very much concerned with the fluctuations of Richmond-Yukon Copper. At the present time stockholders here are much more inclined to buy than to sell.

  • September 16, 1927: Taylor & Drury have acquired the store business at Keno formerly carried on by Thomas Greenway. The stock of merchandise will at once be increased to meet the growing demands of this promising mining camp. Taylor & Drury have now ten stores in Yukon, including their large headquarters at Whitehorse.
  • September 16, 1927: W. A. Puckett has just unloaded two cars of Premier Gasoline and Royalite Coal Oil. Until further notice the prices will be $6.75 per case for Gasoline, $6.50 per case for Coal Oil.
  • September 16, 1927: "The Trail of '98" is going to be one of the most popular pictures yet thrown upon the screen. Behind it is a history and romance wonderful and unique. In imagination millions will make the thrilling trip to the scene of the famous gold rush. Thousands will want to make the trip a reality. No time should be lost in making adequate preparation for this rapidly growing and profitable business. Unless we arouse ourselves the tourist business will catch us napping.

  • September 23, 1927: Pursued nearly three thousand miles from Atlinto Los Angeles, W. A. Weatherby, alias MacCormack, waived extradition, and has been returned to Atlin, where he will have a hearing on theft charges arising out of alleged disappearance of gold from the Engineer mine.
  • September 23, 1927: The Steamer Tutshi has made many trips into the West Arm the past summer, carrying throngs of tourists, who were always loud in their praises of the courtesy of the officers of the Steamer, the magnificent scenery and the bright blue skies, and the warm welcome and kind hospitality extended to all by Mr. and Mrs. Partridge and Miss Dalton of Ben-My-Chree.
  • September 23, 1927: Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Greenfield and daughter Lillian arrived this week from Vancouver. Mr. Greenfield brought in eight head of horses for the mail service. The horses were shipped to Dawson.

  • September 30, 1927: In a lonely cabin on Congdon Creek about 175 miles from Whitehorse Harvey Hebb, an old Yukoner, was found dead in his cabin by Alex Fisher. Word reached police headquarters here last week, and Const. E. Blatta was at once sent to investigate.
  • September 30, 1927: The Steamer Thistle left Monday with a heavy cargo of merchandise for the Taylor & Drury stores at Mayo and Keno. Upon its return the Thistle will make a trip to Teslin, and that will be the last for this season.
  • September 30, 1927: W. H. Edmands of Hillcrest, California, and H. F. Burris, of Yukiah, California, are reported to have had a very successful hunt. Word has reached town that they killed sixteen bear. Andy McKinnon is their chief guide.

October

  • October 7, 1927: Keno people asked the Yukon Council for a grant of $2,000 to provide a landing place for the airplane, then went ahead and built it themselves. Located on the edge of the town the field is 1500 feet long and 800 feet wide, and is now practically ready for the arrival of the "Queen of the Yukon."
  • October 7, 1927: Much needed improvements are being made to St. Andrew's United Church. The whole foundation has been renewed and the building of an additional room to the living quarters is almost completed. The work was done by F. C. Page, J. Dalgarno and Harry Smith, of the shipyards.
  • October 7, 1927: Mrs. Lachappelle returned Tuesday from Dawson, where she had been defending a divorce action. Dr. Lachappelle had petitioned for divorce, and the case was tried at Dawson by Mr. Justice Macauley and a jury. The finding was in favor of Mrs. Lachappelle and the case was dismissed.

  • October 14, 1927: A reported gold strike at Squaw Creek in the vicinity of Dalton Post by an Indian named Big Jim has been the subject of considerable interest here and elsewhere during the past few weeks. Squaw Creek, which does not appear on the map, is by travel about 146 miles southwest of Whitehorse and 12 miles from Dalton Post.
  • October 14, 1927: Grave fears are being entertained here for the safety of Dr. J. O. Lachapelle, Mrs. Bessie Ray and John Timson. On the morning of October 5th they left Stewart City for Dawson in a canoe. No trace whatever has been found excepting that a boat or canoe was reported to have been seen adrift above Ogilvie.
  • October 14, 1927: The first mail stage of the season left Friday morning. The trip from here to Yukon Crossing was made by trucks in charge of James Breaden and A. Pike.

  • October 21, 1927: With her fuselage safely lashed to the upper deck of the vessel, and the wings and engine stowed nearby, the monoplane, Queen of the Yukon, the property of the Yukon Airways and Exploration Company Limited, which will engage in commercial flying between the far removed centres in Yukon territory, with headquarters at Whitehorse, was aboard the steamer Princess Alice on October 19, bound for Skagway, where the machine will take off on her inaugural flight in this new and much needed service.
  • October 21, 1927: On Sunday R. Gooding, telegraph operator at Stewart City, found Dr. Lachapell's spaniel dog in Henderson slough four miles below Stewart City. In a famished condition the dog had to be carried to Stewart, where it is being cared for by Mr. Gooding. Police have reported finding a hat and mitt. There now seems little doubt that all three have perished.
  • October 21, 1927: Percy De Wolfe arrived in Dawson on October 18 after a most arduous trip. In trying to get around a bluff below Fortymile he slipped down a one hundred foot embankment to the river. When he regained consciousness he found that he had had a severe shaking and was badly cut about the face.

  • October 28, 1927: The Richmond-Yukon Copper Limited have all available men at work erecting buildings on the War Eagle property. Here, as on other properties, an intensive drilling campaign will be carried on.
  • October 28, 1927: Canadian Pacific Railway has the Princess Louise and Princess Alice sailing from Skagway to Vancouver on regular schedules. Secure passage now for trip to the Old Country.
  • October 28, 1927: In the past two years there has been a decided increase in the demand for Whitehorse property. The anxiety for permanent homes is largely responsible for the increased demand. During the past week at least five real estate transactions have taken place. There is not an empty house in town which is an unusual condition for this season of the year.

November

  • November 4, 1927: Since beginning operations, the Richmond-Yukon Copper Limited had occupied the buildings on the Copper King property. A few days ago they moved into new buildings on the War Eagle, where diamond drill work is being pushed.
  • November 4, 1927: Mr. and Mr. J. B. Blick came down the Stickine from Telegraph Creek on the last boat of the season and came north to Whitehorse for a brief visit. Mr. Blick is superintendent of the Dease Creek Mines Corporation, which has large and valuable holdings on Dease Creek, and on which they have a large hydraulic plant installed and ready for operation.
  • November 4, 1927: Bert Fowler, foreman at the shipyards, returned Saturday from Atlin. He says Atlin has enjoyed a prosperous season. The tourist travel has been the heaviest in the history of the town and the mining outlook is very bright.

  • November 11, 1927: At the evening service on November 6th, Bishop Stringer gave an interesting account of his trip this summer to the remote Eastern Arctic. Accompanied by Mrs. Stringer he visited the Eskimos along the Arctic one thousand miles to the east of Herschel Island. Some of the Eskimos had never seen a white woman before and in some cases this was the first time they had ever seen a missionary. Bishop and Mrs. Stringer went as far as Cambridge Bay on Victoria Land.
  • November 11, 1927: Yukon has received, and will continue to receive, much valuable publicity from the caribou herds seen and filmed from the White Pass boats on the Yukon river last summer. The sight is one very much out of the ordinary, greatly enjoyed and highly prized by those who witnessed it. The unique experience of viewing herds of caribou from the air was the goodfortune of Superintendent and Mrs. Livingstone Wernecke and Miss Blanche Wernecke at Keno last week.
  • November 11, 1927: The first air mail letter received from Mayo by The Whitehorse Star was from G. N. Shaw, one of the paper's first subscribers when it re-started in March 1924.

  • November 18, 1927: Percy Reid, Yukon gold commissioner, died in Toronto November 14. He had gone there a few weeks ago for medical treatment. He came to Yukon in 1898, and two years later entered the service of the government as mining recorder at Gold Run.
  • November 18, 1927: The Armistice ball held last Friday evening under the auspices of Whitehorse Branch No. 2, British Empire Service League, was certainly a huge suceess from every angle.
  • November 18, 1927: An editorial illustrated by a photo of the aircrfat Queen of the Yukon begins: "At times it may seem that The Whitehorse Star talks too much about itself. Some criticism has been made, and some support may be witheld, because of this apparent weakness. On the other hand friends for the paper are gradually being made because a better understanding between the paper and the people is being created."

  • November 25, 1927: A few davs ago Alex Berry, Galena Hill miner, struck a new lead of fairly high grade ore on a part of the claim not heretofore prospected.
  • November 25, 1927: The incident which happened the Queen of the Yukon on Thursday will be a boost to flying in Yukon, for it has proven that flying can be done in the territory under the most unfavorable weather conditions and that a forced landing is possible without injury to passengers.
  • November 25, 1927: With a new transmitter at Lyle Geary's station, 5 A W, stations all along the Pacitic coast have been communicated with. On November 20th a message was despatched to station 7 AEC in Portland, Oregon and in the brief space of five minutes an answer was received, showing the wonderful possibilities of the Radio League network of which 5 AW is a member.

December

  • December 2, 1927: There is a movement afoot to secure the Gold Commissionership for Robert D. Macaulay. For more than one reason it is difficult to understand how it could have much serious support.
  • December 2, 1927: For residents' skating requirements, Taylor & Drury offers the finest C. C. M. tube skates, electrically welded throughout, hand soldered, for $3.25.
  • December 2, 1927: A full-page report on the Whitehorse Copper Belt by T. H. Kerruish was published. Read the entire report here.

  • December 9, 1927: Unable to call for help Capt. H. Jansen, seventy years of age and a veteran miner of the Ketchikan distriet, died yesterday afer lying for five days suffering from paralysis and without food in bitterly cold weather in a cabin at Point Niblie. He was discovered Sunday and brought to the Ketchikan haspital, where he passed away, He had lived in Alaska for twenty years.
  • December 9, 1927: Jack Turner and dog team arrived Sunday with the mail from the Queen of the Yukon. Sgt. S. D. Ranns and Ed. Kimbel arrived here Monday evening, having walked from the plane. The Queen's engine was taken apart and two cylinders were found to be badly scored. The engine was reassembled but did not run well and parts have been ordered from outside.
  • December 9, 1927: Frank Yokabata has opened a restaurant in Keno.

  • December 16, 1927: General W. P. Richardson, an official of the United States war department, who has spent twenty years in Alaska road construction, has been urging that Canada is the proper country to develop Skagway, and should have possession of it. In Skagway itself, he says, the people would at one time have been in violent opposition to the transfer but now they would favor the idea, and believe that the change would give their town a new lease of life.
  • December 16, 1927: The Star continues its fight against Robert D. Macaulay possibly becoming Commissioner: "Some very pertinent questions are being asked. And quite rightly so for the people have a right to know something of the qualifications. A very suggestive one is: Has Bob Macaulay yet succeeded in making a living for himself? Another: Is the Macaulay family not already very liberally treated in so far as the public treasnry is concerned ?"
  • December 16, 1927: For the first time in the history of Skagway there has been ice on the harbor. The mail boat Margnita had to break through about a mile of ice before it could reach the dock. There have been times when there was a thin coating of shore ice for a few feet, but nothing like a mile has been known before.

  • December 23, 1927: Alfred Dickson was a brief visitor from Tagish last week. He has just disposed of his mink farm as a going concern to J. G. Williams and Eugene Brisson, of Petersburgh, Alaska. Mr. Dickson has made a great success of mink farming. In 1920 he started with seven mink.
  • December 23, 1927: The Northern Commercial Company Limited will open a branch store at Keno. It is not yet decided as to who the Keno manager will be.
  • December 23, 1927: At Mayo, Jack Alverson has struck rich ore which is considered to be a continuation of the Silver King lead.

  • December 30, 1927: The storms of last week blocked the roads. Jitneys operating between Mayo and Keno had great difficulty in getting through. Some were forced to turn back. The ore cats also experienced difficulty, but nevertheless large loads are arriving in Mayo daily.
  • December 30, 1927: Max Wright arrived on the last Princess Mary to take the principalship of the Whitehorse School. He will take over his new duties at the opening of the school on Tuesday morning. Mr. Wright comes from Vancouver.
  • December 30, 1927: In the death of Pat Kennedy at Victoria on December 20th, the north loses another of its oldtimers. Mr. Kennedy came north in the early rush and spent several years in the Atlin district. In 1906 he moved to Conrad, and for most of the time since he made his headquarters at Carcross.

1928

January

  • January 6, 1928: The repairs for the Yukon Airways and Exploration Company monoplane Queen of the Yukon arrived Wednesday evening, and Clyde G. Wann was at once on the job making necessary arrangements to leave by the first stage for Summit roadhouse, near which point the Queen a few weeks ago made a forced landing on a lake.
  • January 6, 1928: On Christmas Eve the Chooutla Indian Residential School went in a body to Carcross and sang Christmas Carols all through the village.
  • January 6, 1928: A. E. Harling returned Wednesday to Bennett, where he will be in charge of the Bennett Eating House for the winter months. He had been spending a couple of months with his family in Victoria.

  • January 13, 1928: For the past two weeks through Lyle Geary's radio station 5AW, inhabitants of St. George Island in the Pribilof group have been aided in keeping in touch with their friends on the outside. Radio 7AER there is owned and operated by H. L. Oliver, the school teacher, who also reports hearing 5AQ owned by E. H. Johnson of Whitehorse.
  • January 13, 1928: Work on the Richmond-Yukon Copper Company's War Eagle mine is progressing satisfactorily according to Superintendent T. L. Kerruish. While the severe weather conditions which the district has experienced so far this winter has been a handicap in several ways, the work underground has continued right along. A crosscut 112 feet long has just been completed from the shaft on the lower level, at the end of which a station is now being cut to accommodate the diamond drill.
  • January 13, 1928: The Treadwell-Yukon Limited have made a record in the hauling of ore. In one day four caterpillar trains arrived in Mayo, bringing 225 tons.

  • January 20, 1928: Dr. Russell Behrns left Tuesday for Dawson in response to an urgent call in connection with the serious ilness of Miss Elizabeth Grant. Two dog teams are being used in charge of Sgt. Sam Ranns and an Indian. Tt was very much regretted that the airplane was out of commission.
  • January 20, 1928: Several people have complained to The Star in connection with the effort being made to secure funds sufficient to purchase an artifcial limb for Philip Andrew. The contention is that the limb should be purchased by the Department of Indian Affairs.
  • January 20, 1928: Mrs. Mavis Thatcher and her two children have gone to Texas to visit Mrs. Thatcher's mother. For the past two years Mrs. Thatcher has been in charge of the section house at the Summit.

  • January 27, 1928: The Whitehorse Star of last week was scarcely off the press when everyone was looking for a copy of MacLean's Magazine of January 1st. The people wanted to read "Yukon Spellbound." Since that time every available copy of the magasine has been in constant use the full round of the clock. At one time bookings for several days ahead were made.
  • January 27, 1928: Lou Anderton, well known packer of the McCarthy district, arrived in town Saturday. He made the distance from McCarthy to Champagne by dog team, and reports a splenid trip. Fur bearing animals seemed to be plentiful in the vast areas where no trapping is being done. Mr. Anderton left Wednesday for Juneau. He will remain there for a time and return home by the westward.
  • January 27, 1928: The Greenfield & Pickering Royal Mail Stage made the only through round trip by tractor with mail and freight to Mayo. Messrs J. Breaden and Boyle left Whitehorse on Friday, January 12th, with a heavy load of mail and freight. When they reached the Junction so much snow had fallen that the trip from there to Mayo was almost impossible for horses. The boys took the Mayo tonnage through with the tractor.

February

  • February 3, 1928: Major T. M. Shoebotham, recently appointed superintendent of the R. C. M. P., officer commanding "B" Division Yukon District, with headquarters at Dawson, was called to his last post at 8.45 o'clock on the evening of January 27th while in attendance at a card party in the Eagle Hall. Death came very suddenly from a direct attack of heart failure. Read that article and much more about Major Shoebotham here.
  • February 3, 1928: Accompanied by James F. Finnegan and Clyde Wann, Archie Close, with a hour horse team, went down the river to bring the Queen of the Yukon over the ice into Mayo. The men are breaking trail with snowshoes.
  • February 3, 1928: People generally throughout the Territory will be very much pleased with the business way in which the Dominion Department of Public Works is endeavoring to clear the channels at Five Fingers and Rink Rapids. This is a very desirable and highly important undertaking.

  • February 10, 1928: On the evening of January 28th Mrs. E. Blatta entertained the Carcross Bridge Club. Her home was tastily decorated for the occasion. Dainty refreshments were served after the games. The remainder of the evening was very much enjoyed, the hostess telling fortunes from the crystals.
  • February 10, 1928: Visit W. A. Puckett for Martin-Senour Paint, made only of Pure White Lead, Pure Zine and well aged Linseed Oil together with the necessary Driers and coloring matter.
  • February 10, 1928: S. C. Thomas, a recent arrival at Skagway from Juneau, has decided to establish himself there in the barber and laundry business.

  • February 17, 1928: A group of American financiers are working out a scheme to link the United States and Alaska by rail as steel is laid from Chicago to the Peace River district. The plan is to cover the construction of a line from the Peace River district to Alaska. The proposed line would link Dawson and Whitehorse in Canada, and Juneau and other points in Alaska directly with the rest of Canada and the United States.
  • February 17, 1928: An outing of unusual interest was enjoyed by the Beavers on Saturday afternoon. Under the direction of Mr. W. D. MacBride the boys had a snowshoe tramp to the rapids. A typical northern camp was made and an appetizing lunch partaken of. Following lunch the party skated on the sheet of glare ice at the rapids.
  • February 17, 1928: In reply to a letter from The Whitehorse Star regarding the case of Philip Andrew, the little Indian boy at Carcross who is in need of an artificial limb, Superintendent Hawksley is forwarding a request to the Indian Department.

  • February 24, 1928: The biggest storm battle in the history of the Alaska Railroad is being waged over 250 miles of the road between Seward and Broad Pass. Dynamite is being used to blast through the deep= drifts of snow on a portion of the northern division.
  • February 24, 1928: W. D. Mackenzie left Mayo February 21st to take charge of the Greenfield & Pickering roadhouse at the Summit, and J. T. Hall was a passenger on the same stage en route to Vancouver.
  • February 24, 1928: Miss Kate McRae, who accompanied Mrs. Shoebotham over the trail from Dawson, left on the return trip this morning. Miss McRae came into the country in 1897, and at that time there was not a building to be seen in Whitehorse. She was agreeably surprised at the size and activity of the town.

March

  • March 2, 1928: There must be many in Whitehorse who remember the visit of A. W. Ruthven-Stuart, a traveller and hunter, who outfitted there last summer for a trip up the Pelly and MacMillan rivers. Today he is in Paris, and all Yukoners, as well as the ever alert publicity department of the White Pass and Yukon Route, will he delighted to learn that he is spreading the name and telling the story of Yukon in the great city of Paris, and Paris means Continental Europe and the world.
  • March 2, 1928: The whistle at the White Pass shipyards sounded for the first time this year much earlier than usual. The White Pass Route have a busy season ahead, with the population increasing and mining operations growing.
  • March 2, 1928: T. C. Richards left Wednesday morning with a caterpillar train of Shamrock eggs, butter and lard for the Mayo branch of P. Burns & Company Limited.

  • March 9, 1928: The report of the hockey games and the Skagway visitors will appear in our next issue. Well on to one hundred Skagwayites came over and they had a good time. Most of them were young and that makes their visit of the more importance.
  • March 9, 1928: Supplies have been sent into the Beaver country in readiness for J. K. Cram, of the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company Limited, who is arranging to go in some time in April.
  • March 9, 1928: Record time was made in moving and installing the new diamond drill at the War Eagle mine. Under the direction of Supt. Kerruish everything was carried out without a hitch. The new drill is in continuous operation and giving every satisfaction.

  • March 16, 1928: Shortly before midnight Sunday Skagway was aroused by the fire alarm. Fire had broken out in the Clayson building, occupied by Mrs. Elizabeth Macomber as a dry goods store. Mrs. Macomber's escape was prevented by an explosion, which may have been the immediate cause of her death, as only parts of the body have yet been recovered.
  • March 16, 1928: The Burns caterpillar broke down at the halfway house between the Junction and Mayo. T. C. Richards and Capt. P. G. Stevens came to Mayo on the Greenfield & Pickering Royal Mail Stage Friday. The cat parts were repaired at the Wernecke machine shop, and the caterpillar train arrived at Mayo Sunday with a heavy load for the P. Burns branch.
  • March 16, 1928: Although the Whitehorse hockey team was again defeated by the Skagway boys, it was not outclassed to the same extent as last year. The scores of the two games played were 4-1 and 3-1 in favor of the visitors, but the games were more closely contested than the scores indicate. The two teams were even nearly all the way and it was not until the last period that Skagway was able to nose out a win.

  • March 23, 1928: An editorial by J. D. Skinner gives a look at the past 4 years of his ownership of The Star - read it here.
  • March 23, 1928: At Mayo, the engine of the Queen of the Yukon has been thoroughly overhauled and is in perfect condition. James Anderson is busy equipping the Queen with skis. Captain Stevens is greatly pleased with the plane and his plans are to have her in the air early next week.
  • March 23, 1928: Yukon lost one of its well known and popular residents Wednesday when Johnnie Rosenburg left for the outside. Mr. Rosenburg had been in the territory for twenty years, sixteen of which he was in the employ of Taylor & Drury. For the past 13 years be was in charge of the company's trading post at Carmacks

  • March 30, 1928: Work on a new hotel to be called the Whitehorse Inn has begun. A gang of men are now at work on the basement and actual building will be under way next week.
  • March 30, 1928: P. J. F. Ransom arrived in town Saturday en route to Mayo where he and assistant G. G. Service will open a branch of the Bank of Montreal.
  • March 30, 1928: Alex Fisher arrived in town Sunday from the Kluane country, bringing with him his season's catch of fur. This is his first visit to town in three years. He leaves on the return trip this week.

April

  • April 6, 1928: George I. Maclean was appointed Gold Commissioner for the Yukon Territory on April 3rd.
  • April 6, 1928: A radio expert is expected to arrive at Skagway on the next Admiral Rogers to install a two thousand dollar sending outfit on short waves. This is to be available for service in case the cable goes down.
  • April 6, 1928: Charles Brefalt has sold a group of four claims on Galena Hill to Treadwell-Yukon Limited. Rumor has the price at $150,000 to $200,000. Mr. Brefalt has contracted with the Treadwell-Yukon Limited to drive a thousand foot tunnel into Galena Hill. The first caterpillar train of lumber and supplies left Mayo for the camp yesterday.

  • April 13, 1928: The entire front page of this issue is about the Queen of the Yukon, the first commercial aircraft in the Yukon Territory. She arrived in Whitehorse on October 25, 1927, and since that time has made flights to Mayo, Keno, Dawson, Carcross, and Atlin.
  • April 13, 1928: The Northern Commercial Company, with branches at Whitehorse, Dawson, Mayo, and Keno, has been appointed sales representatives for the Caterpillar Tractor Company of California and Illinois.
  • April 13, 1928: The newly appointed Gold Commissioner, George I. MacLean, came north on the boat and will come over from Skagway Saturday. In all probability he will go north by plane as this will get him to his destination quickly and he will have an opportunity of visiting Mayo and Keno enroute.

  • April 20, 1928: George I. MeLean, the newly appointed Gold Commissioner for Yukon, arrived here from Ottawa on Saturday last and spent that evening and all day Monday attending to Territorial business. He made an inspection of the hospital, school and Territorial office here.
  • April 20, 1928: William Anderson and Ronald Jackson returned last week from the Boswell, where they spent the winter prospecting. They cut sixteen miles of road to the head of the Boswell and erected four cabins along the way. Mr. Anderson got down twenty feet on his mining claim and rewards it as a very nice prospect.
  • April 20, 1928: The Treadwell-Yukon Limited has 6,700 tons of ore and concentrates on the Mayo waterfront. Of this amount 1,546 tons is from the Lucky Queen mine. Independent shippers have 1302 tons on the waterfront. The trail is good and the caterpillars are still hauling.

  • April 27, 1928: The Supreme Court on April 24th decided that women were not entitled to appointment to the Senate under the present terms of the British North America Act. The case was argued six weeks ago on the application of five Alberta women. The question turned on the interpretation of the word "person" in section 24 of the B.N.A. Act.
  • April 27, 1928: It is appalling to learn that since the arrival of the white man in Canada, forest fires have destroyed 60 per cent of her primeval forest wealth. Read the entire editorial and see the dramatic graphic here.
  • April 27, 1928: The Whitehorse Star has been heavily taxed with work during the past few weeks. Last week a second edition of the paper had to be run off in order to supply the demand. This week it was found necessary to curtail on the usual local news and to refuse some of the advertising offered.

May

  • May 4, 1928: Labor conditions in Yukon are unique. Common labor is well paid and yet there seems always to be a scarcity of men. This may be largely due to the wrong impression outsiders have regarding the north. In no other part of Canada do people as a whole live better than in Yukon. Hardship and poverty are unknown.
  • May 4, 1928: In a few days the Northern Commercial Company will install a Gasoline Pump and will offer motorists a real gas and oil service. Buy gas and oil as you want it and when you want it.
  • May 4, 1928: The Territorial Government should make provision for the renewing of the sidewalks, now in a bad state of repair. During the summer season the walk from the Taylor & Drury corner to the N. S. A. A. Hall is probably the most used in town and is now in a very bad state of repair. This walk should be renewed this year.

  • May 11, 1928: Shortly after two o'clock on Saturday afternoon last the purring of her engine announced that the Queen of the Yukon had returned from a trip to Mayo, Keno and Dawson. While north she made two successful side flights, and considerable business was awaiting her return here. But in the twinkling of an eye the promising outlook was completely changed. A strong wind caught the ship and it collided with W. A. Puckett's Ford truck. The plane is badly damaged.
  • May 11, 1928: The Greenfield & Pickering Royal Mail Stage in charge of Jim McKinnon arrived at Mayo on May 8th. McKinnon reports the trail in very bad condition. The Willow Creek bridge was washed out and he had to ford the stream. He had to go up stream some distance in order to avoid being carried away by the swift current. The water came into the wagon box. At several other points the bridges had gone or were unsafe. The horses broke throngh the ice on one stream and were nearly drowned.
  • May 11, 1928: C. T. Hershman and H. P. Fairhurst came north on the last Princess enroute for the Engineer Mine. Report says that the Engineer will resume operations this season. This is welcome news.

  • May 19, 1928: This week a sea sled arrived from New York for the White Pass & Yukon Route. It arrived on Tuesday's train amd on Wednesday Mr. Wheeler and Cam Smith made a trial run to Lake Lebarge. The new craft did all that had been claimed for it and seemed quite ready to do even more. The trip up stream from the lake to Whitehorse was made in 1 hour and seven minutes.
  • May 19, 1928: The citizens of Whitehorse will extend a warm welcome to Mr. Clayton, who arrived Tuesday to take charge of the new hotel, the Whitehorse Inn. Mr. Clayton's position in the town is an important one for much depends upon the successful management of this splendid hostelry.
  • May 19, 1928: The growing job printing business of The Whitehorse Star is due in a large measure to the quality of work turned out. Every part of every piece of work is done by one man who has had an experience of nearly forty years in the various branches of the printing trade. The last boat brought the latest model Rosback Perforator.

  • May 25, 1928: The Treadwell-Yukon Limited have bought the property of Settlemier and Birmingham on Galena Hill. With these two holdings the company has sufficient ground on Galena Hill to) warrant a mill and the opinion is freely expressed that one will be installed this season.
  • May 25, 1928: The price of residential property in Whitehorse has doubled in the past four years. More transfers are now being made than at any other time in the history of the town. For several years past most of the buying was done by two or three persons who were buying for revenue producing purposes solely. Particularly within the past year new capital is being attracted and anything offering in the line of residential property does not have to go begging for a buyer.
  • May 25, 1928: The Steamer Aksala was the first boat to reach Mayo this season, docking at 9.15 Monday night. She left on the return trip at 7 o'clock Wednesday morning with 150 tons of ore and 1663 empty gasoline tanks.

June

  • June 1, 1928: The Steamer Aksala returned to Mayo Friday night, making the trip from Stewart in thirty-six hours. She left again Saturday afternoon with the largest single barge load of ore ever taken from here. On the barge was 484 tons and on the boat 170 tons.
  • June 1, 1928: W. A Puckett display ad: "All negotiations for the purchase and sale of our hardware business have been discontinued to the satisfaction of the interested parties. We will continue in business at the old stand and a stock of hardware will be kept to meet the needs of this growing district."
  • June 1, 1928: After an absence in the east of eight years, C. W. Cash returned to town on Friday evening last. He recently entered the service of the Northern Commercial Company, and he will organize and superintend the sales force in Alaska and Yukon of the Caterpillar Tractor, which is playing an important part in the solution of the transportation problem of the north.

  • June 8, 1928: The Richmond-Yukon Copper Limited have discontinued drilling operations on their copper properties here. The company had planned big things in connection with their holdings here but the ore bodies struck were not large enough to justify the carrying out of their plans.
  • June 8, 1928: Awaiting a favorable break in the weather, Bennett, the Alaskan pilot, is prepared to hop off in search of the three planes lost in the Arctic more than ten days ago. Bennett will take the route taken by Matt Neiminen, who left Fairbanks almost two weeks ago with Richard Hoyser, radio operator, in search of the two planes carrying two film directors and a camera man to Point Barrow.
  • June 8, 1928: Building operations in town continue brisk, with large additions to the Northern Commercial and P. Burns & Company buildings under way, an automobile and truck showroom being built for Taylor & Drury Limited, and another story being added to the residence of W. D. MacBride.

  • June 15, 1928: According to oldtimers the outlook at Squaw Creek is most promising. Big Jim and Paddy Duncan, the two Indian discoverers, arrived in Whitehorse Saturday with fifty-three ounces of coarse heavy gold, which was placed on display in the window of W. A. Puckett's store. Yukon Council has been asked to provide funding for construction of a road fromm Whitehorse.
  • June 15, 1928: Issac Taylor arrived at Mayo on the first trip of his company's Steamer Thistle, and he spent a few busy days in connection with the Taylor & Drury branches at Mayo and Keno.
  • June 15, 1928: A Nash car was unloaded this week for Dennis O'Connor. The first new model Ford was unloaded here Wednesday and was purchased by Albert Allen.

  • June 22, 1928: C. L. Monroe, Gold Commissioner at Atlin and Constable Webster passed through town on their way to the scene of the gold strike at Squaw Creek. Some fifty claims had already heen recorded on Squaw Creek, and about twenty-five on Goat Creek, Rainbow Gulch amd Bonnie Gulch.
  • June 22, 1928: D. F. Davidson, representing the Imperial Tobacco Company Limited, paid the Star a friendly call on Tuesday afternoon. He spent a few busy days in town on business for his company, and says they have had a very substantial increase in their sales in this section of the country during the past year.
  • June 22, 1928: To meet the demands for down-to-the-minute service Taylor & Drury Limited have installed the newest thing in Gasoline Pumps - The Clear Vision Type - by which the consumer may view the quality and quantity of the gasoline purchased. This modern method of handling will not only mean a saving in the price but will also prevent wastage and do away with the inconvenience of gasoline cans.

  • June 29, 1928: In keeping with the general progressive policy of The Whitehorse Star editor J. D. Skinner leaves this week to attend the Press Convention of Canadian newspaper men to be held at the Macdonald Hotel, Edmonton, on July 4th and 5th. He will be absent from June 30th to July 11th, not long for the distance to be covered.
  • June 29, 1928: Two years ago Major Maurice R. Lynch of Seattle came north to Whitehorse, went down the Yukon River in a small boat and out over the Alaska Railroad. He was so delighted with the trip that he arrived here again Sunday to do it all over again. This time he will stop at Fort Yukon, where he expects to remain for a couple of years.
  • June 29, 1928: That the Chevrolet is becoming very popular in the Yukon, not only as a pleasure car but also as a truck, is evidenced by the arrival this week of two Chevrolet Trucks, one being a Special Delivery of the half ton type for Messrs. Taylor & Drury, Limited, and the other a one-ton Canopy type for Gene Jacquot, who will use it in transportation of supplies for his hunting parties.

July

  • July 6, 1928: Mining prospects were never as bright in the Mayo silver camp. Next season's output is sure to be larger than this. The Treadwell-Yukou Limited holdings are being greatly increased, and individual miners are planning estensive development work.
  • July 6, 1928: City Cafe, Whitehorse, is widely and favorably known because of the excellent service and careful attention given tourists. The Northern Specialties on the Menu such as Whitefish, Lake Trout, Grouse, Ptarmigan, Mountain Sheep, Moose, Caribou and Bear, are very much appreciated. You will visit us when in Whitehorse.
  • July 6, 1928: People hardly realize how rapidly aviation is coming into general use. Yukon just had a taste of it. Its advantages were quickly realized and greatly appreciated. Now nothing short of air transportation will satisfy, even though some may still question the feasibility of flying in the north.

  • July 13, 1928: The Right Revd. I. O. Stringer, Bishop of Yukon, and Mrs. Stringer arrived in Whitehorse from Carcross on Thursday and will remain here until Sunday when they will go on to Selkirk and Dawson. Bishop Stringer expects to hold an ordination in St. Paul's Cathedral, Dawson on Sunday morning, July 29th, when Rev. W. Tinney, of Carcross, will be advanced to the Priesthood and Mr. John Morris, of Teslin, will be ordained Deacon.
  • July 13, 1928: Livingstone Wernecke and P. R. Bradley arrived at Mayo last night. Development work on the newly acquired holdings of the Treadwell-Yukon Limited on Galena Hill will now go forward rapidly. The ore bodies on the Settlemier-Birmingham and Brefalt properties will be blocked out, and a shaft will be driven on the 300-foot level of the Star group claims.
  • July 13, 1928: The town received a shock on Thursday noon when it became known that Miss Jean Gilchrist, Matron of the Whitehorse General Hospital, had passed away that morning due to heart failure. Miss Gilchrist came here from Vancouver early in April. See this and two other brief pieces about Jean Gilchrist here.

  • July 20, 1928: Dr. N. E. Culbertson died at sea on July 12th while he and his wife were returning from six months in England and Scotland where the doctor was taking post graduate work.
  • July 20, 1928: A party of twenty-five tourists arrived from the north on the Steamer Casca Wednesday morning and spent the day here. The party was being conducted by Charles W. Stewart for the Criswell-Adams Travel Service. The route taken was up the coast to Anchorage, over the Alaskan Railroad to Fairbanks, up the Yukon River on the river Steamers and back to salt water at Skagway over the White Pass & Yukon Route. On the way south Thursday morning they got off at Carcross to make the Atlin trip.
  • July 20, 1928: One of the first of the new model Graham Trucks was unloaded here this week. George Ryder was the purchaser. This model has six cylinders and the size is one and three quarter tons. Mr. Ryder will use the track in connection with his business.

  • July 27, 1928: E. W. Mermagen of the Indian and Eskimo Commission, Winnipeg, spent Wednesday evening in town. He had spent a few days at Carcross making an inspection of the Chooutla Residential School.
  • July 27, 1928: The tourist business is of growing importance in Canada. In this respect Yukon has great possibilities, but apart from the transportation companies, nothing is being done to develop this lucrative and promising business. Alaska towns are carrying on aggressive publicity work but nothing is being done along that line by the towns in Yukon.
  • July 27, 1928: J. P. Forde, of the Dominion department of public works at Victoria, and his assistant, A. Halkett, were visitors to Whitehorse this week. They went down the river to make an inspection of the work done at Five Finger and Rink Rapids. From here they left to make an examination of conditions at Glacier Bay, where the glacier is said to be steadily receding and the prediction is made that Canada will some day have a port at this point.

August

  • August 3, 1928: Dr. R. J. Wride of Atlin has received the appointment as physician for the Whitehorse General Hospital and will take over his duties about October 20th. Dr. R. K. Behrns is coming from Mayo to take charge of the work until the arrival of Dr. Wride. Dr. Hilda Behrns arrived from Mayo Wednesday to carry on pending the arrival of her husband. Dr. and Mrs. A. G. Elvin left yesterday for th outside.
  • August 3, 1928: The Steamer Thistle left Mayo on her return trip to Whitehorse at 4.30 Saturday morning and at 10 o'clock ran on a bar opposite Lefebvre's wood camp. Captain E. Morrison assisted for eight hours but without avail. Another foot of water would float the Thistle or if the water dropped sufficiently the vessel could be launched. No damage done.
  • August 3, 1928: The Keno landing field is being put in condition under the direction of W. C. Sime and Jack Carpenter. James F. Finnegan says that the new plane for the Yukon Airways and Exploration Company Limited is expected here this month. the outside.

  • August 10, 1928: Fred MeLennan, who died recently at his home in Vancouver, was Collector of Customs at Whitehorse from October of 1904 until June 1921, when he resigned on account of ill health. He came north in 1898 and conducted a hardware store at Bennett for 2 years, moving to Whitehorse when the railway reached this place in 900.
  • August 10, 1928: Robert Baird, Grand Master of the Masonic Grand Lodge of British Columbia, returned Wednesday from an official visit to Dawson, and in the evening made an official visit to Whitehorse Lodge No. 46. Mr. Baird left Thursday morning to visit Atlinto Lodge No. 42 at Atlin. He was very favorably impressed with his first visit to the north.
  • August 10, 1928: A very important public meeting was held in the N. S. A. A. Hall on Friday evening. The meeting was called for the purpose of dealing with the question of skating accommodation for the coming winter. Undue delay last season was the cause of the town being without ice for the winter and much dissatisfaction was the result.

  • August 17, 1928: George Buchanan of Detroit arrived Sunday afternoon with his "On To Alaska" party of boys, numbering over sixty. They spent Sunday night here and left Monday for Atlin. Mr. Buchanan is a great admirer of the northern country and this is the fourth party of boys he has brought this way. They were a fine bunch of fellows and appeared to be thoroughly enjoying the outing.
  • August 17, 1928: C. H. Bowes, assistant general passenger agent for the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, with headquarters at Vancouver, came north on the last trip of the Princess Charlotte and came over Sunday to visit Whitehorse. He says that there is an increasing interest being shown in this northern country and that increased traffic and general business will naturally follow.
  • August 17, 1928: Patsy Henderson has a display ad for his Indian Museum and instructive lectures at Carcross.

  • August 24, 1928: Bobby Kane discovers the largest nugget yet taken from Squaw Creek, on No. 3 Above Discovery. The nugget has a value of $134.
  • August 24, 1928: T. H. Kerruish and party, who have been up the Hootalinqua River country looking over the old placer fields, arrived back in town Wednesday morning and report that very encouraging prospects were located. The party were looking over the ground for the Richmond-Yukon Company with a view of acquiring dredging ground. Mr. Kerruish plans to put in a Keystone drill next season to fully determine the value of the ground.
  • August 24, 1928: Whitehorse Inn display ad: "The New Palatial Modern Hotel at Whitehorse. The Whitehorse Inn has just been built in keeping with the latest in hotel construction, and newly furnished throughout. The only hotel in Yukon with hot and cold running water in all rooms. All outside rooms with lovely scenic view. Private, connecting and public baths. Beautiful Lounge. Spacious Dining Room. Maid and Bellboys in attendance."

  • August 31, 1928: The town received a shock Thursday afternoon when word reached here that the steamer Thistle, owned and operated by Taylor & Drury Limited, sank in a storm on Lake LeBarge at nine o'clock that morning. The Thistle was loaded to capacity with merchandise for the company's branches at Mayo and Keno, and was also pushing a barge heavily ladened. Evidently the barge was cut loose when the boat was found to be in jeopardy for it has been reported safe. The crew are all safe.
  • August 31, 1928: Two couples from Pennsylvania arrived in Whitehorse Wednesday evening to go into the western country on a big game hunt. They spent a busy morning outfitting and about noon started for the hunting grounds. Gene Jacquot and T. A. Dickson are to be the official guides. This section of the country is becoming very popular with the big game hunters.
  • August 31, 1928: In all probability considerable good wood has been destroyed by the fire across the river this week. Thousands of younger growth are sure to have been destroyed. In the early stages it would seem this fire might have been put out with little effort and expense but there seems to be no legislation providing for dealing with fires such as this.

September

  • September 7, 1928: I. Taylor and his two sons and all the members of the Thistle crew arrived back in town Thursday morning. That portion of the cargo which floated had been picked up and what was worth shipping was billed by Mr. Taylor to the company's posts. The remainder was brought back on the barge. The officers are of the opinion that the lake is at least five hundred feet deep where the Thistle went down.
  • September 7, 1928: J. J. Dore, Superintendent of Government Telegraphs with headquarters at Prince Rupert, is a visitor in Whitehorse this week in connection with a general inspection of the line and offices in this northern section. The general prosperity of the country is being felt on the Government Telegraph lines and in order to handle the growing business expeditiously and give the public the best possible service several improvements are now under consideration.
  • September 7, 1928: The last report of the mystery woman was that she was seen by H. Chambers some distance east of Tahkinna several days after she left here. Mr. Chambers offered to give her a ride to the fork of the road but she declined. To the few people she met on her way north of Hazelton she gave the impression that she was a man hater. [The woman was Lillian Alling]

  • September 14, 1928: Wernecke's Fairchild monoplane is at Carcross already to take-off for Mayo the moment weather conditions are favorable. George Wasson and Harvey Lenche came north with the plane, and the former is remaining here as mechanic. Mr. Wesson and Capt. and Mrs. T. G. Stephens will go north to Mayo on the first flight of the new machine. In passing Whitehorse Capt. Stevens will no doubt fly low in order to give the people a good view of the new ship.
  • September 14, 1928: Little William Charles McDowell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles McDowell, met instant death at the Fournier milk ranch on the Klondyke Wednesday forenoon, when a package of loose dynamite caps he found in the garage exploded in the hand of the little chap. He was born in Mayo in April 1926.
  • September 14, 1928: Joe Knapp arrived here from Seattle Monday evening. The north had been calling and he could no longer resist. Mr. Knapp came north with with the rush in '98 and remained in the Territory for twenty-one years, most of the time being spent at Dawson and Whitehorse. He was one of the original stampeders to the Kluane country. Mr. Knapp is confident that mineral is to be found in the Alsace district and he has returned for the purpose of prospecting in that section.

  • September 21, 1928: There is now every indication that proper landing fields will be in readiness before the freeze-up. The Treadwell-Yukon Limited are undertaking the necessary work on the field at Mayo. The Territorial Government will look after the fields at Whitehorse and Dawson. Three hundred dollars has been allowed for the Whitehorse field and six hundred dollars for Dawson. Messrs Greenfield & Pickering are already at work on the Whitehorse field.
  • September 21, 1928: Accompanied by Major and Mrs. Field and Mr. W. L. Phelps, Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Richards motored to Carcross Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Richards are making a short visit to Atlin and Engineer Mine. The other members ot the party returned to Whitehorse by train. This motor trip is becoming quite popular.
  • September 21, 1928: It is not a common thing for a man to ship in a car with which to search for gold, but that is just what Joe Knapp, an old prospector, has done. Mr. Knapp's car arrived Sunday and Monday morning he was loading his supplies at the local stores, and in the afternoon he was on the trail headed for the Alsace country about two hundred miles to the westward. Mr. Knapp is accompanied by E. L. Johnson. They arrived from Seattle the previous Monday but were held up for a few days here pending the arrival of their car.

  • September 28, 1928: Just before the freeze-up in the Fall and the break-up in the Spring is a more or less hazardous time for the mail contractors. This season Messrs Greenfield & Pickering have secured the permission of the Post Office Department to carry the mail by plane during that period. The Treadwell-Yukon Fairchild monoplane and the Moth now on the way for GreenField & Pickering will be used in this service.
  • September 28, 1928:W. Graham Gillam, V.S., who has been engaged by the Dominion Government to make a tubercular test of the cattle in the Yukon, arrived Friday evening from Cloverdale, B. C., and left Tuesday on the Steamer Casca for Dawson, where he will confer with Commissioner McLean before entering upon his duties.
  • September 28, 1928: While here last week George Simmons bought a nice bunch of twenty mink from John Brown of Champagne. The mink were taken to Mr. Simmons' ranch at Carcross. Mr. Brown was well pleased with the price received.

October

  • October 5, 1928: G. F. Johnson, a prominent business nan of Dawson, arrived from the north last Thursday on the Steamer Whitehorse and left Monday morning for California, where he is also carrying on a retail hardware business. During his absence his Dawson business will be run by E. O. Ellingson.
  • October 5, 1928: Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Satterlee arrived Monday from Seattle enroute for Dawson, where Mr. Satterlee takes charge of the Dawson News for the winter at least. Mrs. Satterlee is also a linotype operator and will be an active member of the staff. Mr. Satterlee came to Skagway and Dyea in the days of the gold rush. In Dyea he worked on the paper known as the Dyea Trail.
  • October 5, 1928: Postmaster' Wilson has just received a supply of the first issue of Government air postage stamps. The Government air rate is five cents. By affixing the air postage instead of the regular postage the letter will be forwarded over the air mail route and the cost to the sender will only be three cents above the ordinary charge.

  • October 12, 1928: The winter mail service begins to-day, and the season opens with an air mail service direct to Dawson. Until such times as the streams freeze Greenfield & Pickering will have a twice-a-week service by air. Two planes are now in readiness for the service.
  • October 12, 1928: An editorial describes the change from the Yukon's all-gold period when river shipping was all downstream, to the current silver period when 700 tons of ore and concentrates were shipped out. Navigation was improved at Five Fingers and Rink Rapids, but more work needs to be done.
  • October 12, 1928: Clyde Wann's mother died at Camas, Washington. She had been suffering from cancer for some time.

  • October 19, 1928: The excitement at Squaw Creek is over for this season. The people have all left the creek as little if anything could be done under existing conditions during the winter months. Fifty-four claims have been staked in British Columbia and thirty in Yukon.
  • October 19, 1928: The tonnage on the river this year has been the heaviest in years. Ore shipments are decidedly on the increase, and the additional mining equipment going in this year can only be taken to mean that the increase is to continue. In anticipation of the heavier tonnage the B. Y.N. will have a new freighter ready for the opening of navigation next year. The outlook for Yukon is most encouraging.
  • October 19, 1928: Yukon Has Air Mail Service. The Klondyke Airways Limited is the second air transportation company organized in Yukon. J. E. Greenfield is president. The company will operate in conjunction with the Greenfield & Pickering Royal Mail Service. The Fairchild and the Moth planes will be used in this service.

  • October 26, 1928: Drs. Russell K. and Hilda Behrns, who were in charge of the hospital here for the past few months, left Monday for the outside. They were here temporarily pending the arrival of Dr. Wride from Atlin, but previous to coming here Dr. R. K. Behrns had been the physician at Mayo since the fall of 1926. Dr. H. H. Boucher arrived from Kelowna last week to succeed Dr. Wride at Atlin.
  • October 26, 1928: Fire broke ont in the Fifth Avenue Theatre, Skagway, on Saturday evening. The theatre was crowded at the time but there was no confusion. Two machines were destroyed but little damage was done the building.
  • October 26, 1928: The call came suddenly for John H. Scott, one of Yukon's most widely known and highly respected citizens. At his desk at 11.30 Wednesday morning, while chatting with Mr. D. A. Muirhead, he suffered a stroke.

November

  • November 2, 1928: After being closed down for years work resumes on the Venus Extension silver mining property at Windy Arm. The old hotel at Conrad, which is of splendid frame construction, has already been acquired for the use of the mine.
  • November 2, 1928: Livingstone Creek Has Mining Possibilities. T. H. Kerruish, superintendent of the White mines organization, who left about ten days ago for the Hootalinqua river country, returned to town Saturday. He was accompanied on his trip by Frank Jim. Lack of sufficient snow, and the lakes on the winter trail still being open, they had to pack in and out with dogs, but report good going all the way.
  • November 2, 1928: C. A. K. Innes-Taylor got married at St. John's Church in Victoria on October 19th. The couple will spend their honeymoon in California.

  • November 9, 1928: An editorial begins with "The question of dealing with forest fires was brought up at the meeting held for the purpose of electing a fire chief on Wednesday evening." It then goes on to say that perhaps people should not involve the government, but just put out fires themselves.
  • November 9, 1928: It is not difficult to forsee that Whitehorse is sure to become an important air base. It has the geographic al position, and it has ample room to provide a landing field for practically all types of machines. The Moth biplane, Rilla-Martha, passed a splendid test on Tuesday.
  • November 9, 1928: W. Telfer arrived from Vancouver on the last boat, and went to Champagne to take a position in Chamber's store. He was accompanied by his son.

  • November 23, 1928: Greenfield & Pickering started the first through overland mail for the north this morning. Since the close of navigation Dawson and Mayo have had a direct plane service and the other points have been served by track.
  • November 23, 1928: The large school bell was recently installed by R. Saunders, A. W. Robinson and Max Wright. This solves the time problem for the school children.
  • November 23, 1928: T. C. Richards, manager in Yukon for Burns & Company Limited, returned Sunday from a brief business trip to Vancouver. Mr. Richards says that the general improvement throughout the Territory has been reflected in the company's turnover. Yukon is commanding more attention on the outside than it has for some time.

  • November 30, 1928: This November in Yukon is said to be the mildest of which any record ean be found. Throughout the month the weather has been ideal. The mean temperature for the first twenty-nine days was 28.65 degrees above zero. This record will make the coast cities green with envy.
  • November 30, 1928: A short time ago T. H. Kerruish secured for the White interests some promising ground on the Hootalingua, and already plans have been made for prospecting the ground next year. The machinery to be used in the work will be taken in during the winter. Mr. Kerruish left for the outside Saturday to acquire the necessary equipment He expects to be back in Whitehorse early in the year.
  • November 30, 1928: Const. Coleman left Keno on November 23rd. with dog team for Pelly Crossing to bring Alex Shafer [correct spelling is Shaver] to the Mayo hospital. Mr. Shafer suffered a stroke some time ago but news of his illness only reached here towards the end of last week.

December

  • December 7, 1928: A lengthy editorial about aviation and mail service concludes with "Air transportation spells a new day for Yukon, and the wonderful progress already made in a section so isolated speaks well for the enterprise of those making the experiment, the sympathy and confidence of the people being served, and the future of the undertaking and of the Territory."
  • December 7, 1928: In the passing of Alex Shaver at Yukon Crossing on November 23rd, Yukon loses another of its early residents. Mr. and Mrs. Shaver and their three daughters came to the Territory in 1898. Read the entire article here.
  • December 7, 1928: The first Yukon Scouts Troop held its first shooting test in the N. S. A. A. Hall on Saturday, November 24th. It is regretted that none of the boys came up to the standard required to qualify for their badge. Mr. E. J. Hamacher is instructing the boys in their rifle work.

  • December 14, 1928: The third flying machine is now in service in Yukon. In the early afternoon Tuesday the Northern Light, an Eaglerock ship, was observed emerging from the sky in the south, and in a few moments she made a quick and graceful landing on the aviation field.
  • December 14, 1928: The first ore to be delivered at Mayo landing by sleigh this season was brought down from the camp by Kimbel Bros. on December 6th. The Treadwell-Yukon cats are now busy hauling. The tonnage promises to be considerably in excess of that of last year.
  • December 14, 1928: Col. J. H. Conrad, at one time well known in southern Yukon, recently passed away in Seattle. He had been suffering from cancer for several years. He was 73 years of age.

  • December 21, 1928: John M. Patterson, the new pilot for the Yukon Airways and Exploration Company Limited, brought his plane down to a pretty landing on the sand bar above Mayo on December 1th. This was the culmination of the long flight of the Northern Light from Colorado Springs to Mayo, and is a tribute to the ability of both Pilot Patterson and Clyde G. Wann in threading their way over desert and mountain to their home base.
  • December 21, 1928: Paddy Page returned to Carcross on Wednesday. Since leaving here he made a round trip to Australia on the Orangi.
  • December 21, 1928: Ed. Kimbel and Norman McLeod came over from Mayo last Saturday on the Northern Light. Mr. McLeod was on his way to the outside, and Mr. Kimbel came to take his new White truck over the trail. The truck is to be used by Kimbel Bros. in their freighting operations between Mayo and Keno.

  • December 28, 1928: On Thursday evening last Mrs. J. A. Browne gave her annual treat to the children of the Carcross school. The scholars, with their teacher, Miss Adele Sansom, assembled at Mrs. Browne's at 6 p.m. A sumptuous repast was heartily enjoyed, and a present was provided for each member of the jolly group.
  • December 28, 1928: Christmas day was duly observed by Christ Church congregation. There was a large attendance at the early celebration at eight o'clock and at the eleven o'clock service. A large congregation of Indians was present at two in the afternoon for their special Christmas service. Later about forty Indians assembled in the Indian school for a Christmas tree, when all received gifts which were much appreciated.
  • December 28, 1928: Robert Jones and Nels Nelson went out this week to repair a damaged bridge near Takhini.

1929

January

  • January 4, 1929: An epidemic of diphtheria is raging at the Fort Vermillion post of the Hudson's Bay Company. The company factor at that point is among the dead. Antitoxin is being rushed there by plane.
  • January 4, 1929: Probably not since the days of the fast stage service given by the White Pass & Yukon Route was such fast time made from Dawson to Whitehorse as that made by the Greenfield & Pickering Royal Mail Stage on its last trip south before Christmas. The total distance, including all stops, was made in 5 days and 8 hours.
  • January 4, 1929: News of the passing in Seattle on Saturday last of Mrs. Marguerite McIlveen came as a shock to her friends here. Better known to Yukoners as Miss Magggie LaRose, she came here with her three bothers about twenty-five years ago. Two of her brothers, Al. and Gene, were drowned running the Whitehorse Rapids in a canoe. Mr. and Mrs. McIlveen left here for Seattle shortly after their marriage several years ago. Miss LaRose was assistant in the post office here for some seventeen years and was a highly respected and deservedly popular official

  • January 11, 1929: Tex Rickard, the well known sport promoter, died at Miami Beach on Sunday, January 6th, from an infection following an operation for appendicitis. The body arrived in New York where it will lie in state at Madison Square Garden before interment.
  • January 11, 1929: H. W. Betts, Collector of Customs at Dawson, was an interested visitor in Mayo Tuesday evening. He came over from Whitehorse on the Northern Light and completed the flight to Dawson Thursday. Although an oldtimer in Yukon this was his first visit to Mayo and he was very much pleased with the size and appearance of the town. He says that already there is a closer and more friendly feeling between the towns of the territory as a direct result of air transportation.
  • January 11, 1929: Although considerable work was done on the landing field here last fall, much yet remains to be done. The field is still too small for landing and taking off and it is stil very rough. If the field is to be put in condition the townspeople must do it or arrange to have it done. Whitehorse has no municipal or other organization to champion work of this kind so some plan will have to be devised to get the movement under way.

  • January 18, 1929: The Burn's caterpillar trains arrived back in Whitehorse this week. They are being loaded to leave again Sunday. Larry Crozier is making another trip with the boys, and R. E. Grieve is joining them on this trip. Mr. Richards has arranged to give wll the boys a holiday on the trail.
  • January 18, 1929: Lieut. A. Innes-Taylor selected fifteen huskies from the Grouse Mountain Kennels and left Vancouver with them January 9th on the R. M.S. Niagara for New Zealand, there to join Commander Byrd's Antarctic expedition.
  • January 18, 1929: On Wednesday afternoon school was closed for the remainder of the week owing to the number of children absent because of the flu. Mr. Wright was among the victims this week. He and H. G. Macpherson are in the hospital,.

  • January 25, 1929: Aviation in Yukon is making rapid strides. Scarcely a week passes that the feasibility of this means of tranportation is not being demonstrated. Probably the best achievement yet was on January 12th, when Pilot J. M. Patterson took off from Mayo with the Northern Light, having as passengers Louis Beauvette and Mrs. Stainsby. Connecting with the train at Carcross, they were able to have breakfast in Mayo and dinner in Skagway on the same day.
  • January 25, 1929: Another of the landmarks of Dawson was practically removed when fire gutted the Eagle Hall on Friday night last. The building was erected and has been in constant use since 1898. The alarm was turned in at 2 a.m. Saturday morning and in a few minutes three hose were playing on the flames and continued to do so for three hours.
  • January 25, 1929: In flying from Whitehorse to Mayo with the Rilla-Martha on Saturday last, Pilot Everett Wasson encountered a bad storm and made a landing on the Pelly river directly in front of the Shaver roadhouse. Monday the weather cleared and Wasson took off and made his destination without further obstacles. This was the first flying ship to make a landing at Pelly, and Mrs. Shaver was very pleased with the unique visit.

February

  • February 1, 1929: J. Monkhouse was a visitor from Tagish this week. He is a brother-in-law of Charles Good and has been at Tagish for some time. He told The Star correspondent that he is in love with the country and that Mrs. Monkhouse is coming north on the next Princess. Tagish is growing and may soon have a post office and school.
  • February 1, 1929: Capt. T. G. Stephens with the Treadwell Yukon monoplane, and Pilot J. M. Patterson with the Northern Light, each covered the 220 miles from Whitehorse to Mayo Thursday in 1 hour and 30 minutes. This is the best flying time yet made between Whitehorse and Mayo.
  • February 1, 1929: Rev. G. C. Ashbee, Carmacks, has been in Selkirk for several weeks assisting Mr. W. D. Young to raze the last large building of the old Police Barracks and to collect material for the erection of a new church on a new site west of the mission house.

  • February 8, 1929: A short time ago a letter was received from a subscriber in Vancouver asking why no Atlin news appeared in the paper. The explanation is that we have finally succeeded in getting capable and live correspondents at Dawson, Mayo and Carcross, but we have not been able to get anyone to take up this important work at Atlin. A little cooperation will solve the problem.
  • February 8, 1929: The credit of starting the first building in Whitehorse in 1929 goes to Dan Gillis. Before going out last fall Mr. Gillis purchased a lot on which to erect a carpenter work shop. While outside he purchased the necessary machinery and this week he began construction of the building.
  • February 8, 1929: On January 12th the Yukon Scouts held their first hike of the year, the Lion Patrol being treated by the Fox Patrol to a beanfeast as an acknowledgement of their defeat in Patrol Competition. In the evening an impressive investiture was held when Recruit Harry Metcalf became a Tenderfoot Scout. John Phelps is the latest addition to the Troop.

  • February 15, 1929: Another striking evidence of the growing co-operative spirit in Whitehorse is the unanimity with which the people got behind the suggestion that a fund be raised by popular subscription to enlarge and condition the Whitehorse aviation field. It is estimated that from one tom two thousand dollars will be required.
  • February 15, 1929: On Tuesday, January 29th, Miss Beatrice R. Terry and the Venerable William A. Geddes, Bishop-elect of Mackenzie River Diocese, were married in St. Paul's Church, Toronto. Miss Perry has been on the staff of All Saints Hospital at Aklavik, and is a graduate of Wellesley Hospital at Toronto.
  • February 15, 1929: E. Butterfield has gone to Conrad to move the hotel from there to the Venus Extension Mine where it will be used as a bunkhouse. This would indicate that work would soon be under way on this property.

  • February 22, 1929: Included in the estimates of the amount to be voted for the Government of Yukon Territory is an item of $35,000 to provide for the payment of a bounty on wolves and coyotes, provided that not more than $30 shall be paid for each wolf pelt and not more than $15 for each coyote.
  • February 22, 1929: J. Williams has his ice yacht running on Lake Bennett at Carcross. This is much earlier than previous years owing to the light snow fall.
  • February 22, 1929: Coming over from Mayo Wednesday Pilot Patterson ran into a heavy fog and storm between Carmacks and Whitehorse and lost his bearings. At dusk he made a landing on the Takhini river, probably thirty miles from Whitehorse, and camped for the night. Once in the air in the morning he had no difficulty locating himself and in a very short time the Northern Light landed in Whitehorse. Tom Fournier and Miss M. Duval were passengers.

March

  • March 1, 1929: Something unique in the history of the Territory took place last Saturday when Commissioner George I. MacLean, Comptroller G. A. Jeckell and J. E. Pickering, the guests of Supt. Livingston Wernecke of the Treadwell Yukon Company, flew from Dawson to Wernecke Camp, a distance of 160 miles, with Capt. T. G. Stephens in the palatial Fairchild monoplane and very much enjoved a minstrel show at the Social Centre of the Camp put on entirely by the Mayo Minstrel Club.
  • March 1, 1929: In Ottawa on February 28th, the addition of the lash to the penalties for trafficking in drugs was approved by a special committee of the House.
  • March 1, 1929: The life-long dream of many Alaskans - an international highway from Alaska, through Canada - will be realized if the efforts of the Alaska International Highway Association, organized in Fairbanks, meet with success.

  • March 8, 1929: Charles Stewart, Minister of the Interior, announces that ample land, including the present aviation field, is set aside for aviation purposes.
  • March 8, 1929: The old Minto Hotel building has been bought by Captain Martin, and is being torn down. It has been unsightly for many years.
  • March 8, 1929: The Lone Star Mine Company Ltd. has some promising quartz property at Dawson, and 50,000 shares were quickly sold for 25 cents each. Operations will be resumed as soon as the weather allows. Messrs. J. N. Spence, Joseph Gadona, T. A. Firth, and E. H. Searle are directors.

  • March 15, 1929: Philip Gault, 20, son of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Gault of Skagway, died of pneumonia at Colfax, Washington on March 11th. His body was returned to Skagway for burial.
  • March 15, 1929: On March 6th, Pilot J. M. Patterson in the Eaglerock biplane, Northern Light, left Whitehorse with a passenger for Mayo and a crank case for a caterpillar tractor of the Walker Fork Mining Company at Fortymile below Dawson. In spite of severe snow storms, the flight was completely successful.
  • March 15, 1929: Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Andison arrived Wednesday from the outside and left Thursday on the Burns tractor train for Mayo, where Mr. Andison will succeed G. N. Shaw as manager of the Mayo branch of Burns & Co.

  • March 22, 1929: Word has been received from Ottawa that Yukon Territory has been granted one Scout on the quota for the International Jamboree to be held in England this coming August. Tom Watson, being the farthest advanced Scout in the 1st Yukon Troop, has been nominated as the representative for this event.
  • March 22, 1929: Alex Fisher arrived in town this week from Kluane. It is just about a year since Mr. Fisher was last in town.
  • March 22, 1929: In New York on March 21st, officials refused a permit for a parade by unemployed musicians in protest of the talking and musical movies.

  • March 29, 1929: Corp. and Mrs. Claude B. Tidd arrived in Whitehorse Tuesday afternoon, travelling all the way by dog team from the Ross River post of the R. C. M. P., a distance of 310 miles. Both were in fine fettle after their long journey on which they developed a tan which is liable to be the envy of many a fair maiden on the great outside. The Corporal has been granted a two-month leave and they are going to spend it outside. Shortly after reaching the Yukon Valley they got a real thrill when a plane flew over them. They had not been aware that planes were operating in Yukon.
  • March 29, 1929: Transportation is changing rapidly in the Yukon. When the crew working to deepen the channel at Fiver Fingers Rapids needed parts to repair a piece of machinery, a wide variety of transport, from ocean steamer to dog team to aircraft, got them there from Vancouver in only 6 days. Read the entire article here.
  • March 29, 1929: Whitehorse can now boast of having one cow within the town limits. That is something unique in the history of Whitehorse. For the past few years Fred Langholz has kept a cow but its home is on the other side of the river so that it really cannot claim Whitehorse residence.

April

  • April 5, 1929: A most disastrous fire occurred at Atlin between one and two o'clock on the morning of April 1st. The fire started in the rear of the Government Liquor Store, presumably from defective pipes, and spread to the Kirkland Hotel and two small dwellings adjoining, and to Clarence M. Sands' store.
  • April 5, 1929: After visiting by plane in winter weather all the larger centres in Yukon, and also Atlin, B.C., in the interests of the Union Oil Company Limited, J. M. Jones left Saturday morning for Vancouver.
  • April 5, 1929: Stimson's Canadian Development Company Ltd. is advertising to raise money to build the Marine Building in Vancouver, and the editor was encouraging people to donate money or labour to improve the Whitehorse airport. Both appeals were successful - the Marine Building, the tallest building in Vancouver until 1939, opened on October 7, 1930.

  • April 12, 1929: Dr. R. J. Wride, anxious to have a part in our community building activities, has donated $35 to the Aviation Field Fund, which now totals $795. Naturally the welfare of the Whitehorse General Hospital is the first concern of the Doctor. Aviation will be a help to the hospital, particularly in emergency cases.
  • April 12, 1929: Mayo is pleased to report three new arrivals: a daughter was born to Sgt.-Major and Mrs. Kerr on April 3rd: a daughter to Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Hare on April 9th: and a daughter to Mr. and Mrs. Profit on April 9th.
  • April 12, 1929: R. Zaccerelli, F. Osborn, J. Townsend, and J. Baptiste arrived last week from Dawson with two caterpillars to take a shipment of machinery for the Treadgold interests over the trail to Dawson.

  • April 19, 1929: Clifford Sifton, for years an outstanding figure in Canadian political and business life, died at Roosevelt hospital in New York on April 17th. He went there from his winter home in Florida to consult a heart specialist.
  • April 19, 1929: Alfred Dickson has bought a new Chevrolet Light Truck and is now busy freighting over the ice from Carcross to his ranch at Tagish. Mr. Dickson predicts that there will soon be a through auto road from Carcross to Atlin.
  • April 19, 1929: The first non-stop flight from Seattle to Juneau was made on April 17th by Pilot Eckmann, of Seattle, with his Lockeed Vega seaplane, in 7 hours and 48 minutes.

  • April 26, 1929: Thirty White Pass employees arrived in town on April 23rd, including the entire crew of the Aksala.
  • April 26, 1929: The Atlin Board of Trade is making a splendid effort to bring the town into progressive stride. An aviation field and better golf links are two of the first items on the programme of expansion and each will be a valuable acquision. The Board has already taken action in connection with the proposed international highway from Fairbanks to Seattle by moving for the completion of the road between Carcross and Atlin.
  • April 26, 1929: Rev. G. C. Ashbee says that Carmacks people are quite interested in the question of a landing field at that point. Mr. Ashbee is very much pleased with the enterprise shown in connection with the Whitehorse aviation field, and he will go back to Carmacks prepared to boost for a landing field there.

May

  • May 3, 1929: The first public demonstration of transmission of the human voice between an aircraft and the ground was conducted in New Jersey on May 1st.
  • May 3, 1929: Atlin pioneer Julius M. Ruffner died recently at Monmouth, Illinois.
  • May 3, 1929: Fred Vey is across Atlin Lake overhauling the Tarahne engines. Bob Todd is overhauling the heating plant of the Atlin Inn. The town folk will soon have that long overdue bath.

  • May 10, 1929: The ice went out on the Yukon river at Dawson at 2.33 p.m. on May 7th. The ice committee reports the winners of the first money to be D. O. Kennedy, Grace Stewart and Thomas Leach, of Anchorage, whose guesses were 2.32 p.m. The pool was approximately $10,000.
  • May 10, 1929: There are one hundred and ten rubber parts in the Model A FORD and a great many of these function solely to protect the car and its oceupauts against the action and the noise of road shocks and power vibrations. W. A. Puckett is the Ford dealer in Whitehorse.
  • May 10, 1929: Almost 100 members of the White Pass boat crews who arrived from the outside on Saturday were listed on page two.

  • May 17, 1929: Yellow gas fumes emanating from the X-Ray room in the basement of the Cleveland Clinic and following a deafening explosion, ended the lives of ninety-five patients, doctors, nurses, hospital aides and rescuers in the greatest tragedy in the history of this city on May 15.
  • May 17, 1929: M. J. Gillespie, Inspector for the Excelsior Life Insurance Company, who arrived this week from Vacouver, says that aviation is giving Yukon some splendid publicity on the outside. Some people claim that there is more plane activity in Whitehorse than in Vancouver.
  • May 17, 1929: Elizabeth C. White, of Juneau, Alaska, storekeeper, intends to apply for permission to purchase 40 acres of land on the Klehini River at the International boundary and about 100 feet east of a deserted Police Post.

  • May 24, 1929: Within the past few years thousands of dollars have been spent in the town on homes and business places. A commendable effort has been made to keep the streets and lanes clean. This year the town will be cleaner and more attractive than ever. But the sidewalks spoil the picture. They are away below what should reasonably be expected. Something should be done at once to remedy the situation.
  • May 24, 1929: The Aviation Field Fund is mounting quietly but steadily. A recent donation by W. H. Simpson of $25 brings it to $920. The people are beginning to realize the benefit it will be to the town.
  • May 24, 1929: Mrs. Ellen Comer, pioneer resident of Caribou and Yukon, died in Vancouver recently at the age of 66.

  • May 31, 1929: The first definite move at to establish the International Highway between Seattle and Fairbanks via Hazelton, Atlin, Carcross, Whitehorse, Kluane and Dawson has been made at a public meeting in Dawson with the formation of the International Association of Yukon.
  • May 31, 1929: James Hogg came down alone in a small boat from Marsh Lake on Wednesday afternoon, successfully negotiating both Miles Canyon and Whitehorse Rapids. He is the first one in years to run the canyon.
  • May 31, 1929: The steamer Tutshi left Carcross on her first trip of the season on Monday evening.
[There are no copies online between May 31, 1929 and January 7, 1938]

November

  • November 8, 1929: Yukon Airways' Ryan B-5 Brougham "Queen of the Yukon," CF-AHD, crashed at Mayo on November 2nd, destroying the aircraft and killing the company's chief pilot, John Patterson.

  • November 29, 1929: Yukon Airways' Alexander Eaglerock "Northern Light," G-CAUZ, was destroyed in a crash on Coal Mine Lake, 2 miles from Carmacks, today. Percy Nelson was the pilot and company president Clyde Wann was the only passenger.
    
    
    
    Continue to January 1930